0206-24 NY Times Crossword 6 Feb 24, Tuesday

Constructed by: Victor Barocas
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Move Dover

Themed answers look like common phrases, but have been reparsed by MOVING a letter D OVER from the end of one word to the start of the other:

  • 62A Change a map of southern England? … or, when parsed differently, what you need to do to the answers to the starred clues : MOVE DOVER (from “moved over”) … or MOVE D OVER
  • 17A *Large container for cinnamon or coriander? : SPICE DRUM (from “spiced rum”)
  • 21A *Gist of a Dear John letter? : LOVE DONE (from “loved one”)
  • 39A *Play matchmaker? : FORGE DALLIANCES (from “forged alliances”)
  • 54A *Tinkling racket on a windy day? : CHIME DIN (from “chimed in”)
  • Bill’s time: 7m 01s

    Bill’s errors: 0

    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    1 Book after II Chronicles : EZRA

    In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Ezra was originally combined with the Book of Nehemiah, with the two being separated in the early days of the Christian Era.

    5 Stone on a set : EMMA

    Actress Emma Stone is from Scottsdale, Arizona. Shereally came to prominence with her performance in the 2010 high school movie called “Easy A”, and won the Best Actress Oscar for her performance in the 2016 movie “La La Land”. Now one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood, Stone values her privacy and works hard to maintain a low profile. Good for her, I say …

    16 Actress Shire of “Rocky” : TALIA

    You might remember Rocky Balboa saying, “Yo, Adrian!” in the original “Rocky” movie. Adrian was Rocky’s wife, played by Talia Shire, sister of director Francis Ford Coppola.

    17 *Large container for cinnamon or coriander? : SPICE DRUM (from “spiced rum”)

    “True” cinnamon sticks are taken from the inner bark of the Cinnamomum verum tree. However, a lot of cinnamon sticks are also sold that come from a related species of tree, and these are more correctly referred to as “cassia”.

    What we know here in North America as cilantro is called coriander in my home nation of Ireland and in other parts of the world. “Cilantro” is the Spanish name for the herb.

    21 *Gist of a Dear John letter? : LOVE DONE (from “loved one”)

    The expression “Dear John letter” originated in WWII among American troops who were serving abroad. The servicemen highly valued letters from girlfriends and wives back home, and almost invariably those missives started out with “Dearest”, or “My Darling” or some other expression of affection. A curt, “Dear John” set the tone for a letter which was likely to contain news of a new love interest in the life of the girlfriend or wife. The contemporary equivalent missive from a male to a female is a “Dear Jane letter”.

    23 Able is he and he is Elba : IDRIS

    Idris Elba is a British actor and DJ. He was born in London to a Sierra Leonean father and a Ghanaian mother. Elba’s breakthrough role came in 2002, when he was cast as Stringer Bell in the HBO series “The Wire”.

    26 Number for John Tyler (or Alexander Hamilton) : TEN

    John Tyler was the tenth President of the US, and the first to take the office on the death of the incumbent. Tyler’s predecessor was President William Henry Harrison, who was in office only 32 days before he died of natural causes. For a while there was a little confusion about the wording in the constitution that covered such an eventuality. There was an argument made that Tyler would continue as Vice-President but would assume the responsibilities of the office of President, in effect as “Acting President”. However, Tyler proceeded as though he was taking over as President and took the oath of office in his hotel room in Washington. Soon afterwards, Congress declared that Tyler was indeed President, although many continued to dispute the fact. Many of President Tyler’s opponents referred to him as “His Accidency”. His term in office ended in 1845. When the Civil War began in 1861, Tyler sided with the Confederacy and was even elected to the Confederate House of Representatives for the 3rd District of Virginia. President Tyler passed away only a few days after taking his seat in the House. His death was the only one in presidential history that was not recognized in the nation’s capital, as he sided with the Confederate States.

    The obverse of the US ten-dollar bill features the image of Alexander Hamilton, the first US Secretary of the Treasury. As such, ten-dollar bills are sometimes called “Hamiltons”. By the way, the $10 bill is the only US currency in circulation in which the portrait faces to the left. The reverse of the ten-dollar bill features the US Treasury Building.

    42 Lose steam : FLAG

    Our verb “to flag” meaning “to tire” was originally used in the sense of something flapping about lazily in the wind. From this it came to mean “to go limp, droop”, and then “to tire”.

    43 Cookie in a Dairy Queen Blizzard : OREO

    A Blizzard is an offering on a menu at Dairy Queen outlets. The original Blizzard was introduced in the 1960s, and was a thick milkshake. The Blizzard was reintroduced in 1985, with a recipe of soft-serve ice cream mixed with a choice of ingredients that include common sundae toppings, brownies and candy. Apparently, the DQ employee serving today’s Blizzard must hold it upside down to demonstrate to the customer that it won’t spill. If that demonstration doesn’t take place, there’s a coupon available for a free Blizzard at the next visit. Well, that’s what I just read …

    49 Deal that protects company secrets, for short : NDA

    Non-disclosure agreement (NDA)

    52 Boneless steakhouse order : FILET

    A fillet is a boneless cut of meat or fish. The term “fillet” comes from the Old French “filet” meaning “small thread, filament”. Apparently, we applied the term to food because the piece of fish or meat was tied up with string after it was boned. Here in the US, we tend to use the French spelling “filet”.

    61 Positive Instagram responses : LIKES

    Instagram (often abbreviated to “Insta”, or “IG”) is a photo-sharing application, one that is extremely popular. Instagram started in San Francisco in 2010. Facebook purchased Instagram two years later, paying $1 billion. The billion-dollar Instagram company had just 13 employees at the time of the sale …

    62 Change a map of southern England? … or, when parsed differently, what you need to do to the answers to the starred clues : MOVE DOVER (from “moved over”) … or MOVE D OVER

    Dover is a town and port in the county of Kent on the south coast of England. Dover lies just 25 miles from the coast of France, and is a terminus on the much-used Dover-Calais ferry service. The town is also famous for its magnificent chalk cliffs that are known as the White Cliffs of Dover.

    65 Grp. that Qatar left in 2019 : OPEC

    Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC)

    Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry.

    66 Rapper Wyclef : JEAN

    Wyclef Jean is an American rap artist who was born in Haiti and emigrated to the US with his family when he was 9 years old. In 2010, Wyclef made a serious attempt to run in the Haitian presidential election. His candidacy was rejected as he had not lived in the country for five years prior to the date of that election.

    Down

    1 Woman’s name that’s also the first four letters of a Central American country name : ELSA

    El Salvador is a country in Central America, the smallest country in the region. The capital of El Salvador is the city of San Salvador. “El Salvador” is derived from the name given to the land by the Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century: “Provincia De Nuestro Señor Jesucristo, El Salvador Del Mundo”, which translates as “Province of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Savior of the World”.

    3 Kellogg’s cereal with a purple box : RAISIN BRAN

    The name of the cereal “Raisin Bran” is not trademark protected. The Skinner Manufacturing Company introduced Raisin Bran in 1926, and did have trademark protection until 1944. At that time, an appeals court ruled that “Raisin-BRAN” should not be considered a trademark as it is merely a description of the cereal’s ingredients.

    6 Lead-in to maid or man : MER-

    The mythological creatures named mermaids are usually depicted with the head and upper body of a human female, and with the tail of a fish. The term “mermaid” comes from the Old English “mere” meaning “sea, lake” and “maid” meaning “young woman”. The original mermaids were probably tail-less, with that “fishy” addition likely coming with comparison to classical sirens. The male equivalent of a mermaid is “merman”.

    8 Brink’s truck feature : ARMOR

    The Brink’s security company was founded in 1859 in Chicago by Perry Brink. Brink’s started out as an armored transportation service.

    9 1980s TV role for Brosnan : STEELE

    The eighties detective show “Remington Steele” stars Stephanie Zimbalist as a private detective Laura Holt, and Pierce Brosnan as the handsome bad boy Remington Steele, who’s really a good boy. The show successfully melds the detective genre with elements of romantic comedy.

    Pierce Brosnan is an Irish actor from Drogheda, a town north of Dublin. Brosnan’s big break in the US came when he was given the title role in the eighties television show “Remington Steele”. Famously, he also played James Bond on the big screen. Brosnan’s first appearance as Bond was in 1995’s “GoldenEye”. He was asked to take the role much earlier, in 1987, but Brosnan couldn’t get out of his contract for “Remington Steele”. Brosnan was the fifth actor to play Bond, after Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore and Timothy Dalton.

    10 Game with Lollipop Woods and Gumdrop Mountains : CANDY LAND

    The board game Candy Land first went on the market in 1949, and in 2005 was named the most popular “toy” of the whole 1940s decade.

    18 Online financial company : E-TRADE

    E-Trade is mainly an online discount brokerage. It was founded in 1982 in Palo Alto, California, and I used to drive by its headquarters almost every day. The company is now run out of New York City. E-Trade used to produce those famous Super Bowl ads with the talking babies staring into a webcam.

    22 “Il Trovatore” composer : VERDI

    Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Il trovatore” is known in English as “The Troubadour”. It is one of the few operas with more than one version written by the same composer. Verdi wrote a French translation, with some revisions to the score, which goes by the name “Le trouvère”.

    24 Like some panels and flares : SOLAR

    Solar panels are arrays of solar cells that make use of what’s known as the photovoltaic effect. We are more likely to have learned about the photoelectric effect in school, in which electrons were ejected from the surface of some materials when it was exposed to light or other forms of radiation. The photovoltaic effect is related but different. Instead of being electrons ejected from the surface, in the photovoltaic effect electrons move around in the material creating a difference in voltage.

    A solar flare is a sudden energy release from the surface of the Sun that can be perceived as a flash of brightness and an eruption of magnetic energy. That magnetic energy reaches the Earth about two days after the event, and can disrupt long-range radio communications on our planet. The location of solar flares has been strongly linked to sunspot groups, groups of dark spots on the Sun’s surface.

    27 “___ Holmes” (streaming film about Sherlock’s sister) : ENOLA

    “The Enola Holmes Mysteries” is a series of detective novels for young adults by American author Nancy Springer. The title character is the 14-year-old sister of 34-year-old Sherlock Holmes, the detective created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Springer’s novels were adapted into a 2020 film “Enola Holmes” that Netflix picked up at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. I saw this one, and the sequel, and enjoyed both …

    29 Earthworm hunters : MOLES

    One of the more commonly known facts about my native Ireland is that there are no snakes in the country (outside of politics, that is). A lesser known fact is that there are no moles either. There are plenty of snakes and moles in Britain, just a few miles away. Over a pint, we tend to give the credit to Saint Patrick, but the last ice age is more likely the responsible party …

    33 Automaker with a Cybertruck : TESLA

    Tesla’s Cybertruck is an electric-powered pickup truck that the company unveiled in 2019. It’s a pretty futuristic design, one inspired by the flying cars in “Blade Runner” and the automobile/submarine Lotus Esprit in “The Spy Who Loved Me”.

    37 Standoffish : ALOOF

    I suppose one might guess from the “feel” of the word “aloof” that it has nautical roots. Originally “aloof” meant “to windward” and was the opposite of “alee”. A helmsman might be instructed to stay aloof, to steer the boat into the weather to keep a distance from a lee-shore. It is from this sense of maintaining a distance that aloof came to mean “distant” in terms of personality. Interesting, huh …?

    46 “___ Fideles” : ADESTE

    The lovely Christmas hymn “Adeste Fideles” (entitled “O Come, All Ye Faithful” in English) was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time. A kind blog reader pointed out to me that the English translation is in fact a little “off”. The term “adeste” best translates from Latin as “be present, attend”, rather than “come”. The verb “come” appears later in the lyrics in “venite adoremus”, meaning “come, let us worship”.

    51 “Simple” nursery rhyme character : SIMON

    The first verse of the English nursery rhyme is:

    Simple Simon met a pieman,
    Going to the fair;
    Says Simple Simon to the pieman,
    Let me taste your ware.

    56 Retail giant whose first store opened in Älmhult, Sweden : IKEA

    The IKEA furniture chain was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943, when he was just 17-years-old. IKEA is an acronym standing for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don’t forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

    60 Foe of Mr. Bond : DR NO

    “Dr. No” may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you’ve read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you’ll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. Julius No and Fu Manchu. By the way, the author Ian Fleming tells us that Julius No attended medical school in Milwaukee.

    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1 Book after II Chronicles : EZRA
    5 Stone on a set : EMMA
    9 Heat almost to the point of boiling : SCALD
    14 Bad person to trust : LIAR
    15 Close at hand : NEAR
    16 Actress Shire of “Rocky” : TALIA
    17 *Large container for cinnamon or coriander? : SPICE DRUM (from “spiced rum”)
    19 Sign up for, as a contest : ENTER
    20 Good qualities : ASSETS
    21 *Gist of a Dear John letter? : LOVE DONE (from “loved one”)
    23 Able is he and he is Elba : IDRIS
    25 Depend (on) : RELY
    26 Number for John Tyler (or Alexander Hamilton) : TEN
    28 Tiny matter? : ATOM
    30 Place back on the market, say : RELIST
    34 Not yet up : IN BED
    36 Laundry unit : LOAD
    38 Pot starter : ANTE
    39 *Play matchmaker? : FORGE DALLIANCES (from “forged alliances”)
    42 Lose steam : FLAG
    43 Cookie in a Dairy Queen Blizzard : OREO
    44 Perfect : IDEAL
    45 Seasonal workers in red suits : SANTAS
    47 Recovers some yards? : SODS
    49 Deal that protects company secrets, for short : NDA
    50 Midmonth date : IDES
    52 Boneless steakhouse order : FILET
    54 *Tinkling racket on a windy day? : CHIME DIN (from “chimed in”)
    58 Jog the memory of : REMIND
    61 Positive Instagram responses : LIKES
    62 Change a map of southern England? … or, when parsed differently, what you need to do to the answers to the starred clues : MOVE DOVER (from “moved over”) … or MOVE D OVER
    64 Unconcealed : OVERT
    65 Grp. that Qatar left in 2019 : OPEC
    66 Rapper Wyclef : JEAN
    67 Pick on, in a way : TEASE
    68 On deck : NEXT
    69 Analogy words : IS TO

    Down

    1 Woman’s name that’s also the first four letters of a Central American country name : ELSA
    2 Closes, as a fly : ZIPS
    3 Kellogg’s cereal with a purple box : RAISIN BRAN
    4 Followed a curved path : ARCED
    5 Breaks off a relationship : ENDS IT
    6 Lead-in to maid or man : MER-
    7 Viciously attack : MAUL
    8 Brink’s truck feature : ARMOR
    9 1980s TV role for Brosnan : STEELE
    10 Game with Lollipop Woods and Gumdrop Mountains : CANDY LAND
    11 Kind of sax : ALTO
    12 Lender’s security : LIEN
    13 Have the courage : DARE
    18 Online financial company : E-TRADE
    22 “Il Trovatore” composer : VERDI
    24 Like some panels and flares : SOLAR
    26 Dust-ups : TIFFS
    27 “___ Holmes” (streaming film about Sherlock’s sister) : ENOLA
    29 Earthworm hunters : MOLES
    31 Deal sweeteners : INCENTIVES
    32 Stand in good ___ : STEAD
    33 Automaker with a Cybertruck : TESLA
    35 Kitchen counters? : EGG TIMERS
    37 Standoffish : ALOOF
    40 Gave a shot, say : DOSED
    41 Designed with passageways : AISLED
    46 “___ Fideles” : ADESTE
    48 To the point : DIRECT
    51 “Simple” nursery rhyme character : SIMON
    53 Nontext component of a text : EMOJI
    54 Form lumps : CLOT
    55 Bee complex : HIVE
    56 Retail giant whose first store opened in Älmhult, Sweden : IKEA
    57 “Uh-uh” : NOPE
    59 Lacking clutter : NEAT
    60 Foe of Mr. Bond : DR NO
    63 Cause trouble for : VEX

    6 thoughts on “0206-24 NY Times Crossword 6 Feb 24, Tuesday”

    1. 20:32 with “maim” instead of “maul” which sorta, kinda gave me “moved on(e)” for 21A….oh well….

    2. 13:42, 2 errors: DOSE(S); CHIME(S)IN. Should have looked at the clue more closely. I read ‘Give a shot, say’.

    3. 8:21, no errors. Clever, indeed … 🙂.

      I recently bought a Mac Book Air to replace my aging iMac and I’ve been spending a lot of time moving files onto it. In the process, I came across an old email in which I said that the NYT crossword of Saturday, January 4, 2014, took me an hour and a half to do and that I spent another half hour with Google to understand some of the clues. Curious, I downloaded a copy of the puzzle and did it again. I still thought it was hard, but it took just over 40 minutes and I didn’t need Google to help me understand anything. Of course, it’s possible that my crossword lizard brain retained helpful memories of the thing, but I still choose to believe that I’m a better solver now than I was ten years ago. (Maybe, at 81, one clings to whatever hopeful signs one can … 😜.)

    4. 13:48. Started with “we’rE DONE” instead of LOVE DONE, and it took me a while to recover. I guess “we’re done” was a “weir done” (Almost works).

      Victor Barocas is one of those setters that always gives me trouble. Although his doesn’t quite qualify, I’ve noticed that those with sesquipedalian (just learned that word and was dying to use it somewhere) surnames always make challenging puzzles.

      Did not know coriander and cilantro were the same thing.

      Best –

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *