0110-24 NY Times Crossword 10 Jan 24, Wednesday

Constructed by: Chloe Revery & Alissa Revness
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Sharing is Caring

Themed answers are common phrases in which “SH” is replaced with “C” at the start of the last word:

  • 60A Preschool teacher’s mantra … or a hint to the answers to the starred clues : SHARING IS CARING
  • 17A *Job for a coxswain with rowdy rowers? : TAMING OF THE CREW (from “Taming of the Shrew”)
  • 23A *Review for a so-so bakery? : NO GREAT CAKES (from “no great shakes”)
  • 38A *Person who assigns the order of opening presents? : GIFT COP (from “gift shop”)
  • 49A *Completes a superhero transformation? : GET INTO CAPE (from “gets into shape”)

Bill’s time: 10m 01s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Podcasters’ needs : MICS

A podcast is basically an audio or video media file that is made available for download. The name comes from the acronym “POD” meaning “playable on demand”, and “cast” from “broadcasting”. So, basically a podcast is a broadcast that one can play on demand, simply by downloading and opening the podcast file.

5 Meaty pasta sauce : RAGU

Bolognese is a meat-based sauce originating from Bologna in Italy, hence the name. The recipe is usually referred to as “ragù alla bolognese” in Italian, or simply “ragù”. Note that the Ragú brand of sauces introduced in North America in 1937 takes its name from the same source (pun … sauce!). However, the brand name uses the wrong accent (“Ragú” instead of “Ragù”), which drives a pedant like me crazy ..

14 Apple with multiple cores : IMAC

When Apple chose the letter “I” prefix for the iMac in 1998, that letter “I” stood for “Internet”. Steve Jobs and his marketing team followed up with the message that I also stood for “individual, instruct, inform and inspire”.

15 Eurasian river : URAL

Eurasia is the combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia. It accounts for 36% of the total landmass on the planet, and is home to 71% of the Earth’s population.

17 *Job for a coxswain with rowdy rowers? : TAMING OF THE CREW (from “Taming of the Shrew”)

The coxswain of a boat is one in charge of steering and navigation. The word “coxswain” is shortened to “cox”, particularly when used for the person steering and calling out the stroke in a competition rowing boat.

William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew” is about a courting couple. The male in the couple is Petruchio, a gentleman of Verona, and the female is Katharina/Kate, the so-called “shrew”. As the play progresses, the “shrew” is “tamed” and becomes an “obedient” bride … a controversial storyline in the contemporary world, to say the least. Regardless, modern adaptations have been made, including 1948’s Broadway musical “Kiss Me, Kate” and the 1999 romantic comedy “10 Things I Hate About You”.

20 What’s tolerated by every body? : TYPE-O

In general, a person with type O-negative blood is a universal donor, meaning that his or her blood can be used for transfusion into persons with any other blood type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive (although there are other considerations). Also in general, a person with type AB-positive blood is a universal recipient, meaning that he or she can receive a transfusion of blood of any type: A, B, AB or O, negative or positive.

26 2007 Michael Moore documentary about health care : SICKO

Like all of Michael Moore’s films, his 2007 documentary “Sicko” tends to polarize his audience. The film deals with the health care system in the United States, comparing it with the systems in place in other countries. Having lived in two of the countries covered in the movie, France and the UK, I can attest that the basic facts presented about those foreign health care systems are accurate. Now Moore’s style of presentation of those facts … that might give rise to some debate …

37 Dorothy Parker quality : WIT

Dorothy Parker was a poet and satirist, and a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. After the famed meetings at the Algonquin Hotel ceased, Parker headed to Hollywood where she became a successful screenwriter, earning two Oscar nominations. However she ended up on the Hollywood blacklist for being involved in left-wing politics. When Parker passed away in 1967, her body was cremated. Her ashes remained unclaimed for over twenty years before the NAACP took charge of them and placed them in a specially-designed memorial garden outside their headquarters in Baltimore. The plaque reads:

Here lie the ashes of Dorothy Parker (1893–1967) humorist, writer, critic. Defender of human and civil rights. For her epitaph she suggested, ‘Excuse my dust’. This memorial garden is dedicated to her noble spirit which celebrated the oneness of humankind and to the bonds of everlasting friendship between black and Jewish people.

Parker’s ashes were reburied in a family plot in the Bronx, New York in 2020.

43 Norse protector of humankind : THOR

In Norse mythology, Thor was the son of Odin. Thor wielded a mighty hammer and was the god of thunder, lightning and storms. Our contemporary word “Thursday” comes from “Thor’s Day”.

44 Complain querulously : CARP

The word “carp” used to mean simply “talk” back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian “karpa” meaning “to brag”. A century later, the Latin word “carpere” meaning “to slander” influenced the use of “to carp” so that it came to mean “to find fault with”.

45 Kyrgyzstan mountain range : ALAI

The Alay (also “Alai”) Mountains are located in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. The highest peak in the range is Pik Tandykul, which lies on the international border between the two countries.

Kyrgyzstan is a landlocked country in Central Asia that is a former Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR). The country name’s root “Kyrgyz” translates as “We are forty”. This is a reference to the forty united clans in the region that united under a legendary hero named Manas. The Kyrgyzstan flag also features a sun with forty rays, a further reference to the clans.

56 Island nation whose currency is the tala : SAMOA

The currency used in Samoa is the “tala”, which is a transliteration of “dollar”. The tala is divided into 100 “sene”, a transliteration of “cent”.

64 Brazilian berry : ACAI

Açaí (pronounced “ass-aye-ee”) is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

65 She, on the Seine : ELLE

The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. It empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

67 Word repeated in a 1956 Doris Day single : SERA

The 1956 song “Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)” was first performed by Doris Day in the Hitchcock film “The Man Who Knew Too Much”. Day later used the same tune as the theme song for the sitcom “The Doris Day Show” that aired in the late sixties and early seventies.

As Doris Day told us, “que será, será” is Spanish for “whatever will be, will be”. Actually, the phrase is “pseudo-Spanish”, and isn’t grammatically correct.

Down

4 “Magic that works,” per Vonnegut : SCIENCE

Kurt Vonnegut was a writer from Indianapolis whose most famous work is probably the novel “Slaughterhouse-Five” from 1969. Beyond his writing, Vonnegut was noted for his support of the American Civil Liberties Union and American Humanist Association. Kurt had a brother who made a big contribution to society. Bernard Vonnegut was the atmospheric scientist who discovered that silver iodide could be used to seed clouds and artificially create rain.

7 Social blunder : GAFFE

Our word “gaffe”, meaning “social blunder”, comes from the French “gaffe” meaning “clumsy remark”, although it originally was a word describing a boat hook. The exact connection between a boat hook and a blunder seems to be unclear.

8 Marine leader? : ULTRA-

Ultramarine is a deep blue color. The name was originally applied to a pigment made by grinding the semi-precious stone lapis lazuli into a powder. “Ultramarine” comes from the Latin for “beyond the sea”, a reference to the fact that the pigment was imported into Europe from Afghanistan by Italian traders.

10 Ad ___ : HOC

The Latin phrase “ad hoc” means “for this purpose”. An ad hoc committee, for example, is formed for a specific purpose and disbanded after making its final report.

12 One of the Astaires : ADELE

Fred Astaire’s real name was Frederick Austerlitz. Fred was from Omaha, Nebraska and before he made it big in the movies, he was one half of a celebrated music hall act with his sister Adele. The pair were particularly successful in the UK, and Adele ended up marrying into nobility in England, taking the name Lady Charles Cavendish.

13 Caterwauls : YOWLS

To caterwaul is to utter long cries, to “wail” like a “cat”.

24 Its name means “waterless place” in Mongolian : GOBI

The Gobi, the large desert in Asia, lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. It is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s forward progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so-called “Green Wall of China”. The name “Gobi” is Mongolian for “waterless place, semidesert”.

29 Number of graduates in the first class at West Point (1802) : TWO

West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn’t start until 1802. The first female cadets were admitted to West Point in 1976, and as of 2018, about 15% of all new cadets were women.

33 Writer Umberto : ECO

Umberto Eco was an Italian writer who is probably best known for his novel “The Name of the Rose”, published in 1980. In 1986, “The Name of the Rose” was adapted into a movie with the same title starring Sean Connery.

39 Animal whose brain has the most gray matter of any mammal : ORCA

Gray matter and white matter are the two components of the central nervous system. Gray matter is mainly made up of neurons, and white matter is largely made of axons, the projections of the neurons that form nerve fibers.

50 Frome of fiction : ETHAN

“Ethan Frome” is a novel by New York and Massachusetts author Edith Wharton, first published in 1911. Wharton started “Ethan Frome” as a composition in French that she wrote while studying the language in Paris. The novel was adapted into a 1993 film of the same name starring Liam Neeson in the title role, opposite Patricia Arquette.

51 Classical cover-ups : TOGAS

In ancient Rome, the color of a man’s toga could indicate the wearer’s social status. For example, a plain white toga (known as a “toga candida”) was worn by candidates for political office, while a “toga praetexta” with a purple border was worn by magistrates and certain priests. A “toga picta”, which was decorated with elaborate embroidery and gold trim, was reserved for victorious generals and triumphal processions.

53 Labor activist Chavez : CESAR

César Chávez was a Mexican-American farm worker, and co-founder of the union today known as the United Farm Workers. Chávez was born in Yuma, Arizona, but moved to California as a child with his family. He never attended high school, dropping out to become a full-time migrant farm worker. In 1944, at 17 years of age, he joined the US Navy and served for two years. 5-6 years after returning from the military, back working as a farm laborer, Chávez became politically active and rose to national attention as an articulate union leader during some high profile strikes. He is remembered annually here in California on his birthday, March 31, which is a state holiday.

57 “___ 18” (novel by Leon Uris) : MILA

“Mila 18” is a novel by American author Leon Uris that is set during WWII in Warsaw, Poland after the occupation by Germany. The book’s title refers to the bunker that served as headquarters of the Jewish resistance group in the Warsaw Ghetto. The bunker was located at “Ulica Mila 18” (“18 Pleasant Street” in English).

62 O.S.S. successor : CIA

The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was formed during WWII in order to carry out espionage behind enemy lines. A few years after the end of the war the OSS functions were taken up by a new group, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) that was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Podcasters’ needs : MICS
5 Meaty pasta sauce : RAGU
9 “Hey, by the way …” : OH, SAY …
14 Apple with multiple cores : IMAC
15 Eurasian river : URAL
16 Abstain from : NOT DO
17 *Job for a coxswain with rowdy rowers? : TAMING OF THE CREW (from “Taming of the Shrew”)
20 What’s tolerated by every body? : TYPE-O
21 Natural hairstyles : AFROS
22 Poorly : ILL
23 *Review for a so-so bakery? : NO GREAT CAKES (from “no great shakes”)
26 2007 Michael Moore documentary about health care : SICKO
28 “You’ve got ___ nerve!” : SOME
29 Melody : TUNE
30 It’s often in stock : BONE
34 Chose a course : OPTED
37 Dorothy Parker quality : WIT
38 *Person who assigns the order of opening presents? : GIFT COP (from “gift shop”)
40 “Yes,” in Japanese : HAI
41 Check box of last resort : OTHER
43 Norse protector of humankind : THOR
44 Complain querulously : CARP
45 Kyrgyzstan mountain range : ALAI
47 Extremist sects : CULTS
49 *Completes a superhero transformation? : GET INTO CAPE (from “gets into shape”)
54 And others too numerous to mention : ETC
55 Nary a soul : NO ONE
56 Island nation whose currency is the tala : SAMOA
60 Preschool teacher’s mantra … or a hint to the answers to the starred clues : SHARING IS CARING
63 Have a nibble of : TASTE
64 Brazilian berry : ACAI
65 She, on the Seine : ELLE
66 Expression that might accompany a mustache twirl : SNEER
67 Word repeated in a 1956 Doris Day single : SERA
68 Brighter times : DAYS

Down

1 It’s catching : MITT
2 “Not sure yet” : I MAY
3 Something to make or break : CAMP
4 “Magic that works,” per Vonnegut : SCIENCE
5 Runner on the ground? : RUG
6 Like an excited crowd : AROAR
7 Social blunder : GAFFE
8 Marine leader? : ULTRA-
9 Small ice cream order : ONE SCOOP
10 Ad ___ : HOC
11 “Never mind what I just said!” : STRIKE THAT!
12 One of the Astaires : ADELE
13 Caterwauls : YOWLS
18 Cozy corner : NOOK
19 Romantic attraction, slangily, with “the” : … HOTS
24 Its name means “waterless place” in Mongolian : GOBI
25 Hype (up) : AMP
26 Something to follow, in cards : SUIT
27 “If so, then …” : IN THAT CASE …
29 Number of graduates in the first class at West Point (1802) : TWO
31 Poetic frequency : OFT
32 Utmost : NTH
33 Writer Umberto : ECO
35 Buds go in them : EARS
36 Dance floor flourish : DIP
38 Less sharp, as footage : GRAINIER
39 Animal whose brain has the most gray matter of any mammal : ORCA
42 They’re raised in Chi-Town : ELS
44 Found innocent : CLEARED
46 Part of, as a plot : IN ON
48 “___-daisy!” : UPSA
49 Tales of daring : GESTS
50 Frome of fiction : ETHAN
51 Classical cover-ups : TOGAS
52 Chilling : ON ICE
53 Labor activist Chavez : CESAR
57 “___ 18” (novel by Leon Uris) : MILA
58 Exclusively : ONLY
59 Wrinkles in time? : AGES
61 Its ways are numbered: Abbr. : RTE
62 O.S.S. successor : CIA

8 thoughts on “0110-24 NY Times Crossword 10 Jan 24, Wednesday”

  1. 16:15, no errors. Sufficiently confusing so that, before filling the final square, I double-checked everything to make sure on-the-fly corrections had gone in as intended.

    I got 9-Across from an alternate version of an old song, beginning with the lines “Hey, by the way, can you see, by the dawn’s early light, what so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming …”

    (Okay, so maybe I made that last bit up … 😉.)

  2. 14:46. I suppose both Chloe and Alissa got REVved up for this puzzle.

    Took me forever to get TYPE-O because I was reading it wrong (TYPO). What does Bill say about less haste? The fact that my blood type is O neg makes it even worse.

    Did not know that about the origin of the name Kyrgystan.

    Best –

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