0430-23 NY Times Crossword 30 Apr 23, Sunday

Constructed by: Lewis Rothlein & Jeff Chen
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Name Dropping

Themed answers are all in the down-direction, and come in pairs in the same column. The upper element includes a NAME as a hidden word, a NAME that must be DROPPED to make sense of the clue. Those NAMES DROP to the lower element of the pair to complete the last answer in the same column:

  • 18D Reeked : STANK (drop “HERMAN”)
  • 91D Person dealing with casting and lines : FLY FISHERMAN
  • 19D Check out, as a book : BORROW (drop “WANDA”)
  • 92D 2004 Don Cheadle film set in Africa : HOTEL RWANDA
  • 28D Cautious (of) : CHARY (drop “DONNA”)
  • 90D Title woman who has children at her feet, in a 1968 hit : LADY MADONNA
  • 34D Informants, informally : FINKS (drop “ETHAN”)
  • 94D Like England in the late 16th century : ELIZABETHAN
  • 42D Longtime anchor of “NBC Nightly News” : BROKAW (drop “ETHEL”)
  • 110D Accept defeat, in modern slang : TAKE THE L
  • 44D Guarding, as a goal : TENDING (drop “RICK”)
  • 115 Director of “The Shining” and “Dr. Strangelove” : KUBRICK

Bill’s time: –m –s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

7 ID that’s never reused : SSN

The main purpose of a Social Security Number (SSN) is to track individuals for the purposes of taxation, although given its ubiquitous use, it is looking more and more like an identity number to me. The social security number system was introduced in 1936. Prior to 1986, an SSN was required only for persons with substantial income, so many children under 14 had no number assigned. For some years the IRS had a concern that a lot of people were claiming children on their tax returns who did not actually exist. So starting in 1986, the IRS made it a requirement to get an SSN for any dependents over the age of 5. Sure enough, seven million dependents “disappeared” in 1987. Today, a SSN is required for a child of any age in order to receive a tax exemption.

18 2020 film starring a cartoon dog : SCOOB!

“Scoob!” is a 2020 animated comedy movie that is part of the “Scooby-Doo” franchise. The title character is voiced by voice actor Frank Welker, who is best known for voicing Scooby-Doo’s companion Fred Jones in the original animated TV series. In “Scoob!”, Fred Jones is voiced by actor Zac Efron.

21 Tony-winning musical with puppets : AVENUE Q

“Avenue Q” is a musical inspired by “Sesame Street”, with puppets being used for all the characters on the stage. It’s an adult-oriented production, but a parody of the children’s show. Some of the characters are clearly knock-offs of “Sesame Street” favorites e.g. Rod and Nicky (Bert and Ernie) and Trekkie Monster (Cookie Monster).

24 Southern California sch. : SDSU

San Diego State University (SDSU) was founded in 1897 as San Diego Normal School. Back then, the main purpose of the school was to educate women who wanted to be elementary school teachers. It changed its name to San Diego State Teachers College in 1923. The curriculum expanded beyond teacher education in 1935, and became San Diego State College. In 1960, the college joined what is now known as the California State University.

26 Old Testament prophet : AMOS

Amos is one of the twelve minor prophets in the Hebrew Bible. The Old Testament’s Book of Amos is attributed to him.

27 One of cinq in “Tartuffe” : ACTE

In French, there might be “cinq actes” (five acts) in a play.

“Molière” was the stage name of French actor and playwright Jean-Baptiste Poquelin. It is amazing how well the comedies of Molière, written in the 1600s, entertain us on stage today. Among his best-known plays are “The Misanthrope”, “The School for Wives” and “Tartuffe or the Hypocrite”.

29 One of 100 in Pooh’s woods : ACRE

Hundred Acre Wood is where Winnie-the-Pooh lives with his friends. According to a map illustrating the books by A. A. Milne, Hundred Acre Wood is part of a larger forest, with Owl’s house sitting right at the center. Piglet also lives in the Hundred Acre Wood, in a beech tree next to a sign that says “TRESPASSERS W”. Piglet says this is short for Trespassers William, which is his grandfather’s name.

31 H.S. safety org. : SADD

Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) was founded in Massachusetts in 1981. SADD’s aim is to prevent road traffic accidents by urging students to avoid potentially destructive decisions (such as driving under the influence of alcohol).

36 Eldest of a literary trio : ATHOS

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is the trio’s young protégé D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

39 Barrier to entry : STILE

A stile is a structure allowing people to pass over or through a fence, while at the same time preventing livestock from escaping. The derivative term “turnstile” describes a revolving structure in a wall or fence that allows the controlled passage of people.

42 ___ blockers (heart rate meds) : BETA

Beta blockers are drugs used primarily to manage cardiac arrhythmia and hypertension. Basically, beta blockers interfere with the fight-or-flight response.

49 Cutting part of The Onion? : SATIRE

“The Onion” is a satirical news network, with a print newspaper and a heavy online presence. “The Onion” newspaper was founded by two college students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1988. The founders sold the operation a year later for about $20,000. The paper grew steadily until 1996 when it began to publish online and really took off. I think it’s worth a tad more than $20,000 today …

54 Baseball slang for a home run : TATER

Apparently, a baseball has long been referred to as a tater (also “potato”). In the seventies, a long ball started to be called a “long tater”, and from this a home run became a “tater”.

56 Ones getting hit on at parties? : PINATAS

Piñatas originated in Mexico, probably among the Aztecs or Mayans. Today’s piñatas are usually made from cardboard that is brightly decorated with papier-mâché. Traditionally a piñata was made out of a clay pot, adorned with feathers and ribbons and filled with small treasures. During religious ceremonies the clay pots would be suspended and broken open so that the contents would spill out onto the ground at the feet of a god as an offering.

60 Tool that evolved from the sickle : SCYTHE

Sickles and scythes are similar tools that are used for reaping crops. A sickle has a short handle, forcing the user to stoop down. A scythe has a long handle, allowing it to be used while standing erect.

61 Microwave : NUKE

The first microwave oven was invented in 1946 by Percy Spencer, an engineer at Raytheon. While he was standing beside an active radar unit, which used microwaves, he noticed that the candy bar in his pocket had melted. Spencer proceeded to expose various foods to microwaves in tests that would lead to the development of the first commercial microwave oven.

64 Hindu god of pleasure : KAMA

Kama is the Hindu god of love. He is portrayed as a youth bearing a bow and arrows, much like Eros and Cupid. Kama lends his name to the “Kama Sutra”.

67 Climbing Kilimanjaro, e.g. : TREK

Kilimanjaro is a dormant volcano in Tanzania, and is the highest mountain in the whole of Africa.

71 “Squawk Box” network : CNBC

“Squawk Box” is a business news show that airs on CNBC on weekday mornings. The name comes from a device used in brokerage houses, a permanently open intercom that is used to communicate stock transactions.

76 Shipping option : UPS

United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky. UPS often goes by the nickname “Brown”, because of its brown delivery trucks and brown uniforms.

84 Singer Marian, the first African American to perform at the Met : ANDERSON

Marian Anderson was a contralto from Philadelphia who spent her singing career performing in concerts and recitals rather than taking on operatic roles, despite many requests from respected opera companies. Anderson eschewed the invitations on the grounds that she had not been trained to act. As an African American, Anderson was at the forefront in the struggle for artists of color to overcome racial prejudice. In 1939, she was refused permission to sing in Washington’s Constitution Hall that is owned by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). This decision resulted in First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt resigning from the DAR. Mrs. Roosevelt and her husband then backed an open-air concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial that same year, which was a resounding success.

86 Bathroom powders : TALCS

Talc is a mineral, hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

88 Car driven by Thelma and Louise, familiarly : T-BIRD

Ford manufactured the Thunderbird (T-Bird) from 1955 to 2005. Originally a two-seater sporty convertible, the T-Bird was introduced as a competitor to Chevrolet’s new sports car, the Corvette. The “Thunderbird” name is a reference to a legendary creature from the culture of several Native-American peoples. There’s also a story that the name is a direct reference to the Thunderbird Country Club in Rancho Mirage, California of which the then chairman of Ford’s board was a member.

“Thelma & Louise” is a thought-provoking movie, and one that is very entertaining. It was directed by Ridley Scott in 1991, and stars two fabulous leads in Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon. You’ll also spot Brad Pitt onscreen in his first significant movie role.

91 Lager-head? : FROTH

Lager is so called because of the tradition of cold-storing the beer during fermentation. “Lager” is the German word for “storage”.

106 Plays a Halloween prank on, in brief : TPS

TP’ing (toilet papering) is a prank involving the covering of some object or location with rolls and rolls of toilet paper. If you live in Texas or Minnesota, that little “prank” is legal, but if you live here in California it is classed as mischief or vandalism.

107 Actress Lillian with a 75-year film career : GISH

Lillian Gish is most famous for her performances on the silent screen, although she acted in films in a career that lasted from 1912 to 1987, over 75 years. Gish’s best known role was Elsie in D. W. Griffith’s “Birth of a Nation”, released in 1915.

108 Pain reliever with an oxymoronic name : ICY HOT

Icy Hot is a topical heat rub that is used to relieve muscular discomfort and pain from arthritis and rheumatism. The active ingredient doesn’t provide any heat or cold, but it does stimulate nerve receptors in the skin causing the user to experience a cool sensation followed by warmth.

117 Beezus’s sister, in children’s literature : RAMONA

Ramona Quimby is a character in a series of “Henry Huggins” children’s novels penned by Beverly Cleary. As she became a little older, Ramona merited her own set of stories.

119 Refined : URBANE

We use “urbane” today to describe something courteous or refined. Back in the 1500s, the term was used in the same way that we now use “urban”. Those townsfolk thought they were more sophisticated than the country folk, and so the usage evolved.

Down

1 Something that may elicit stares, in brief : PDA

Public display of affection (PDA)

3 Pac-12 Conference athlete : UTE

The Utah Utes are the athletic teams of the University of Utah.

8 What a gavel bang may mean : SOLD

The small hammer that one raps on a table or desk to call a meeting to order, or perhaps to signify a sale at an auction, is called a gavel. The term “gavel” is actually American English, and is a word that emerged in the early 19th century.

10 Give a lecture, with “out” : REAM …

I must admit that I find the slang term “to ream out”, with its meaning “to scold harshly”, to be quite distasteful. The usage of the word as a reprimand dates back to about 1950.

13 Org. in “Argo” : CIA

“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I highly recommend “Argo”, although I found the scenes of religious fervor to be very frightening …

27 Subway line toward New York’s Kennedy Airport : A-TRAIN

The A Train in the New York City Subway system runs from 207th Street, through Manhattan and over to Far Rockaway in Queens. The service lends its name to a jazz standard “Take the ‘A’ Train”, the signature tune of Duke Ellington and a song much sung by Ella Fitzgerald. One version of the lyrics are:

You must take the A Train
To go to Sugar Hill way up in Harlem
If you miss the A Train
You’ll find you’ve missed the quickest way to Harlem
Hurry, get on, now, it’s coming
Listen to those rails a-thrumming (All Aboard!)
Get on the A Train
Soon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem.

28 Cautious (of) : CHARY

To be “chary” is to be hesitant, unwilling to proceed. The term come from the Old English “cearig” meaning “sorrowful, full of care”. So “chary” sort of means “care-y”, i.e. careful.

30 New York’s ___ Field : CITI

Citi Field is a relatively new baseball stadium used by the New York Mets that sits right next door to the site of Shea stadium, where the Mets had played for decades. The new facility’s name comes from corporate sponsor Citigroup.

35 Botanists’ specimens : FLORAE

The fauna (plural “faunae”) is the animal life of a particular region, and the flora (plural “florae”) is that region’s plant life. The term “fauna” comes from the Roman goddess of earth and fertility who was called Fauna. Flora was the Roman goddess of plants, flowers and fertility.

42 Longtime anchor of “NBC Nightly News” : BROKAW

Tom Brokaw is a much-respected television journalist who is mostly seen on NBC. Brokaw is also the author of the excellent 1998 history of WWII and its aftermath called “The Greatest Generation”.

47 Understand, as coined in 1961’s “Stranger in a Strange Land” : GROK

To grok is to understand. “To grok” is a slang term that’s really only used in “techie” circles. “Grok” is the creation of science fiction author Robert Heinlein, who coined it in his 1961 novel “Stranger in a Strange Land”.

48 Tegan and ___ (indie pop duo) : SARA

Tegan and Sara are an indie pop duo comprising Tegan Rain Quin and Sara Keirstan Quin, identical twin sisters from Canada.

49 High ___ : SEAS

The phrase “international waters” is generally understood to mean the “high seas”, parts of oceans and seas that fall outside of national jurisdiction. There are also semi-enclosed bodies of water that have been declared international waterways. One example is the Danube River, which is deemed to be an international waterway so that it gives secure access to the Black Sea for the landlocked nations Austria, Hungary, Moldova, Serbia and Slovakia.

50 Popular singer who has recorded in Elvish : ENYA

Enya co-wrote and performed a song titled “Aníron” for “The Lord of the Rings” series of films. The song’s lyrics are written in the Elvish language of Sindarin, a fictional language that was created by author J.R.R. Tolkien.

65 Texter’s segue : BTW

By the way (BTW)

70 Penalty boxes, in hockey lingo : SIN BINS

The penalty box (less formally “sin bin”) is an area used in several sports for a player to serve out a given time penalty. Sin bins are used perhaps most notably in ice hockey, rugby and roller derby.

76 Gets a lift (but not a Lyft) : UBERS

When transportation company Uber went public in 2019, it was a well-subscribed offering. However, Uber’s shares dropped in value soon after trading opened, and finished the day 11% down. As a result, Uber shares suffered the biggest IPO first-day dollar loss in US history.

77 Sport whose players wear boots : POLO

The sport of polo originated in Iran, possibly before the 5th century BC. Polo was used back then primarily as a training exercise for cavalry units.

85 Prohibition and others : ERAS

The 18th Amendment to the US Constitution was a great victory for the temperance movement (the “dry” movement), and in 1919 ushered in the Prohibition era. Highly unpopular (with the “wet” movement), Prohibition was repealed in 1933 by the 21st Amendment.

89 Commotion : FRACAS

“Fracas”, meaning “noisy quarrel”, is a French word that we absorbed into English. In turn, the French usage evolved from the Italian “fracasso” meaning “uproar, crash”.

90 Title woman who has children at her feet, in a 1968 hit : LADY MADONNA

The 1968 Beatles hit “Lady Madonna” was the last song the band recorded before starting their own Apple Records label. The song’s lyrics mention every day of the week except Saturday. Paul McCartney admitted in an interview that the omission was a mistake, and one that he and John Lennon only noticed after the song was recorded.

92 2004 Don Cheadle film set in Africa : HOTEL RWANDA

“Hotel Rwanda” is a very disturbing 2004 film that is based on a real account of events in 1994 in the Rwandan Genocide. “Hotel Rwanda” has been compared to “Schindler’s List” in that it tells of one man fighting to save as many people as he can from the genocide taking place in his country. Don Cheadle has the starring role.

Don Cheadle is a Hollywood actor who is perhaps best known for his lead role in the 2004 drama “Hotel Rwanda” that deals with the harrowing subject of genocide. Since then, Cheadle has been very active in campaigns to end genocide in Darfur, Sudan.

94 Like England in the late 16th century : ELIZABETHAN

The Elizabethan era, the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, is considered by many to be the golden age of English history. It was the age of William Shakespeare and the age of the English Renaissance. Elizabeth I was the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, and the last sovereign of the House of Tudor.

95 Trig function : COSINE

Trigonometry (trig) is a branch of mathematics dealing with triangles, and calculations based on the relationship between a triangle’s angles and the lengths of its sides.

100 ___ facto : IPSO

“Ipso facto” is Latin, a phrase meaning “by the fact itself”. It describes something that is a direct consequence of a particular act, as opposed to something that is the result of some subsequent event. For example, my father was born in Dublin and was an Irish citizen, ipso facto. My son was born in California and is an Irish citizen by virtue of being the son of an Irish citizen (i.e. “not” ipso facto).

104 Call overseas : AHOY!

“Ahoy!” is a nautical term used to signal a vessel. When the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, he suggested that “ahoy” be used as a standard greeting when answering a call. However, Thomas Edison came up with “hello”, and we’ve been using that ever since.

107 It means “waterless place” in Mongolian : GOBI

The Gobi, the large desert in Asia, lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. It is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s forward progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so-called “Green Wall of China”. The name “Gobi” is Mongolian for “waterless place, semidesert”.

109 Musical artist who designed Reykjavik’s Imagine Peace Tower : ONO

“Wish Tree” is a series of living art installations by Yoko Ono. The series consists of native trees planted under her direction, Ono invites viewers to tie written wishes to the trees. Ono has been installing “Wish Tree” exhibits in locations around the world since the 1990s. She does not read the wishes, but collects them for burial under the Imagine Peace Tower, a memorial to John Lennon located on an island near Reykjavik, Iceland. There are over a million such wishes under the memorial today.

110 Accept defeat, in modern slang : TAKE THE L

Just take the L, take the loss.

114 Runner Sebastian with four Olympic medals : COE

Sebastian Coe is a retired middle-distance runner from the UK who won four Olympic medals including golds in the 1500m in 1980 and 1984. After retiring from athletics, Coe went into politics and served as a Member of Parliament from 1992 to 1997. In the year 2000, he was made a Life Peer, and so Coe now sits in the House of Lords. Lord Coe headed up London’s successful bid to host the 2012 Summer Olympic Games.

115 Director of “The Shining” and “Dr. Strangelove” : KUBRICK

Stanley Kubrick was a film director from New York who worked mainly in the UK. Kubrick directed “Spartacus” in Hollywood in 1960, and then relocated to the UK to shoot “Lolita” in 1962. His next film was “Doctor Strangelove”, which also had to be shot in the UK. At that point, Kubrick decided to make England his home.

116 Hockey great Bobby : ORR

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking. While still 31 years old, in 1979, Orr became the youngest person inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Prior to that, in 1967, Orr became the youngest person named the NHL’s Rookie of the Year.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Cuts back : PRUNES
7 ID that’s never reused : SSN
10 Colorful seafood : RED COD
16 Removals of impurities, informally : DETOXES
18 2020 film starring a cartoon dog : SCOOB!
20 Put on a pedestal : HEROIZE
21 Tony-winning musical with puppets : AVENUE Q
22 “Anybody home?!” : HELLO!
23 Burst of sonic ecstasy : EARGASM
24 Southern California sch. : SDSU
25 Bestow : ENDOW
26 Old Testament prophet : AMOS
27 One of cinq in “Tartuffe” : ACTE
29 One of 100 in Pooh’s woods : ACRE
31 H.S. safety org. : SADD
33 Repeated musical phrase : RIFF
36 Eldest of a literary trio : ATHOS
37 Pair of glasses? : RIMS
38 Little monster : SNOT
39 Barrier to entry : STILE
41 Big fat mouth : TRAP
42 ___ blockers (heart rate meds) : BETA
43 Can you dig it? Yes, you can! : DIRT
45 Angels can be found in it : SNOW
46 Long blade, of a sort : OAR
47 Curved edges formed by intersecting vaults, in architecture : GROINS
49 Cutting part of The Onion? : SATIRE
51 Before, in poetry : ERE
52 5, 6 or 7, in golf : MIDIRON
54 Baseball slang for a home run : TATER
56 Ones getting hit on at parties? : PINATAS
58 “I’m dead serious” : NO JOKE
59 Cheering loudly : AROAR
60 Tool that evolved from the sickle : SCYTHE
61 Microwave : NUKE
62 Attaches with a click : SNAPS ON
64 Hindu god of pleasure : KAMA
65 Does away with : BANS
67 Climbing Kilimanjaro, e.g. : TREK
69 Learned : WISE
71 “Squawk Box” network : CNBC
74 “True ___” : THAT
75 Mother ___ : HEN
76 Shipping option : UPS
79 Word with rolling or bowling : … PIN
80 Related (to) : AKIN
81 Having a commanding lead : WAY AHEAD
83 Verbal equivalent of a thumbs-down : BOO!
84 Singer Marian, the first African American to perform at the Met : ANDERSON
86 Bathroom powders : TALCS
87 One whose boss laughs a lot : ELF
88 Car driven by Thelma and Louise, familiarly : T-BIRD
89 Charged toward : FLEW AT
91 Lager-head? : FROTH
93 “Al-l-lmost done” : IN A SEC
96 Spanish title: Abbr. : SRA
97 Grows : SWELLS
99 Events of interest, with “on” : GOINGS …
101 Feeling down : LOW
103 Bit of vocal fanfare : TA-DA!
105 Home project inits. : DIY
106 Plays a Halloween prank on, in brief : TPS
107 Actress Lillian with a 75-year film career : GISH
108 Pain reliever with an oxymoronic name : ICY HOT
111 Synonym and rhyme of “erases” : EFFACES
115 Insulating sleeve for a beverage : KOOZIE
117 Beezus’s sister, in children’s literature : RAMONA
118 String-and-spool toy : DIABOLO
119 Refined : URBANE
120 Approve : SAY OK
121 Dastardly expression : SNEER
122 Subject of many a political scandal : BRIBE

Down

1 Something that may elicit stares, in brief : PDA
2 Amp (up) : REV
3 Pac-12 Conference athlete : UTE
4 Desirable flight option : NONSTOP
5 Radiates : EXUDES
6 Goes out with : SEES
7 Improv bits : SCENES
8 What a gavel bang may mean : SOLD
9 “Oh well, it didn’t matter anyway” : NO LOSS
10 Give a lecture, with “out” : REAM …
11 Concerns for coders and copy editors : ERRORS
12 Has a “ruff” night? : DOG-SITS
13 Org. in “Argo” : CIA
14 Baking meas. : OZS
15 “___ Bones” (classic spiritual) : DEM
17 The get-go : SQUARE ONE
18 Reeked : STANK
19 Check out, as a book : BORROW
20 “Whoa!”-inducing experiences : HEAD TRIPS
27 Subway line toward New York’s Kennedy Airport : A-TRAIN
28 Cautious (of) : CHARY
30 New York’s ___ Field : CITI
32 Two-thirds of 105-Across : DO-IT
34 Informants, informally : FINKS
35 Botanists’ specimens : FLORAE
36 Very tiny bit : ATOM
40 Homophone of vowels not found in this answer : EWES
42 Longtime anchor of “NBC Nightly News” : BROKAW
44 Guarding, as a goal : TENDING
47 Understand, as coined in 1961’s “Stranger in a Strange Land” : GROK
48 Tegan and ___ (indie pop duo) : SARA
49 High ___ : SEAS
50 Popular singer who has recorded in Elvish : ENYA
53 What “Nothing for me” might mean : I JUST ATE
55 Upside? : TOP
57 Plastic conveniences : ATM CARDS
62 Calls (for) : SENDS
63 Playfully bite : NIP AT
65 Texter’s segue : BTW
66 When you get it, you may say it : AHA!
68 Oohed and aahed, e.g. : REACTED
70 Penalty boxes, in hockey lingo : SIN BINS
72 Lead-in to tech : BIO-
73 Atlanta’s ___ Center : CNN
76 Gets a lift (but not a Lyft) : UBERS
77 Sport whose players wear boots : POLO
78 The first letter in “gigantic,” but not the third : SOFT G
82 Partner of hems : HAWS
85 Prohibition and others : ERAS
89 Commotion : FRACAS
90 Title woman who has children at her feet, in a 1968 hit : LADY MADONNA
91 Person dealing with casting and lines : FLY FISHERMAN
92 2004 Don Cheadle film set in Africa : HOTEL RWANDA
94 Like England in the late 16th century : ELIZABETHAN
95 Trig function : COSINE
96 Commotion : STIR
98 Came up with an invention? : LIED
100 ___ facto : IPSO
102 Theme park cry : WHEE!
104 Call overseas : AHOY!
107 It means “waterless place” in Mongolian : GOBI
109 Musical artist who designed Reykjavik’s Imagine Peace Tower : ONO
110 Accept defeat, in modern slang : TAKE THE L
112 Groupie : FAN
113 Only prez to receive a patent : ABE
114 Runner Sebastian with four Olympic medals : COE
115 Director of “The Shining” and “Dr. Strangelove” : KUBRICK
116 Hockey great Bobby : ORR

16 thoughts on “0430-23 NY Times Crossword 30 Apr 23, Sunday”

  1. 32:25, no errors. I remember doing this one, two weeks ago, and I seem to recall that Bill was abroad at the time, so the blog went missing for a day or two. Curiously, a few days from now, I will be in London at the start of a trip to various places in the British Isles. At 80 (and also, in light of world events in recent years), I’m looking forward to the trip, but with more angst than I would have had a few years ago.

    One nit: the name that needs to be moved from 18-Down to 91-Down is HERMAN, rather than SHERMAN.

      1. @Nick …

        If you drop SHERMAN to follow FLY FIS, you end up with FLY FISSHERMAN. If, instead you drop HERMAN to follow FLY FIS, you get FLY FISHERMAN. (The shaded squares in the grid are correct; there was simply a glitch in Bill’s comments.)

  2. I didn’t know until I got here who the setter(s) were and now I know why it is such a piece of crap👎👎

  3. Beyond ridiculous. The first time I’ve ever had to look up the explanation of a theme; but, even after reading it, I had to look at the answers to make sense of it. I’m sure most solvers just threw this one away so, the authors’ attempt to display their twisted thought processes only served to ruin everyone’s Sunday morning enjoyment. Way to go, boys.

  4. I loved it! And the theme was very helpful in solving it. Thanks Jeff, Lewis and Will for a fun Sunday puzzle.

  5. I was having troubles with this puzzle trying to get the bottom answers. I kept singing Lady Madonna in my head as the answer for 90 but it wouldn’t fit. Then, for no apparent reason, I looked above in the puzzle and saw DONNA in the highlighted squares. Suddenly I understood the gimmick, and, wow, did it help solve those bottom clues! I understand everyone’s angst at this puzzle; I wish you could have had that enlightenment and felt the joy that I did.

  6. No errors and totally in awe of the construction. Sundays have been a bit “meh” lately so this was a welcome challenge.

  7. Things I’ve never heard of:
    Heroize (idolize is a word), AvenueQ, Red cod, Tartuffe, Tegan and Sara, Tater, Koozie, Diabolo, A movie called “Scoob”, Beezus and Ramona, Marian Anderson, Amos the prophet, chary, Squawk Box, Lilian Gish, Dem Bones.
    But still finished with only two empty squares Sara, Tater, Groins cross.

  8. I completed most of the puzzle and it was very late in the game before I even paid attention to the theme (the Seattle Times version does not include the theme title), until the remaining squares at the bottom, as well as 19 down etal., had to be reckoned with. It first clicked with Brokaw then Lady Madonna. I was also stuck on the top left, until an aha moment with prunes, an unexpected synonym for cuts back. The get-go was bothering me til the cross answers I added, thanks to cracking the theme, revealed the word one at the end then square one.
    I have done a few of Jeff Chen’s puzzles and the name inspires both fear and respect. At first I thought this was a Sunday puzzle that would be my undoing but I worked my way up from the bottom (while nursing the nagging worry of 90 down etal) and gradually invaded all territory with a steady ground fighting til the revelation of the theme evoked the killer instinct and resulted in an air attack at the end that smoked out the last holdouts. I was out to take no prisoners but overlooked one of the theme answers which I should have known (I’ve seen both those movies + was a fan of A Clockwork Orange), leaving one survivor at square 115 down in the SE sector of the battlefield. A final door to door campaign to hunt down any survivors, tired and bloodied as I was, may have led to total victory but it was not to be.

  9. Had a tough time in the beginning then things started falling together. Looks like from the blog above it was enjoyable for most everyone. Usually don’t see that kind of consensus.

    I have to admit I never got the second part of the theme until I actually read it here. I remember when I got to LADY MA , I kept singing the song too. “Lady Madonna, children at your feet…”.. not even recognizing DONNA was right above !!!! Same with the others. DOH!

    I’m all right with the world now.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *