0212-23 NY Times Crossword 12 Feb 23, Sunday

Constructed by: Christina Iverson & Samuel A. Donaldson
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Cheap Thrills

Themed answers are all synonyms of “ECONOMIZING”. Also, the themed answers reference particular elements in the grid:

  • 24A Economizing, as represented by the circled squares? : CUTTING CORNERS (with a SAW & AXE)
  • 40A Economizing, as represented twice in 12-Down? : PINCHING PENNIES (pinching two “CENT”s)
  • 94A Economizing, as represented in 58-Down? : STRETCHING A BUCK (stretching a “SINGLE”)
  • 111A Economizing, as represented by the shaded squares? : MAKING ENDS MEET (making “BUM, ASS, CAN, BUTT” meet)

Bill’s time: 37m 58s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Become hysterical, with “out” : WIG …

The idea behind the expression “to wig out”, meaning “to go crazy”, is that there is so much going on in your brain that it might “lift your hair/wig”.

8 Restaurant competitor of Pinkberry and Sweet Frog : TCBY

TCBY is a chain of stores selling frozen yogurt that was founded in 1981 in Little Rock, Arkansas. The acronym TCBY originally stood for “This Can’t Be Yogurt”, but this had to be changed due to a lawsuit being pressed by a competitor called “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt”. These days TCBY stands for “The Country’s Best Yogurt”.

17 Where dancers have a ball? : DISCO

Discotheques first appeared during WWII in Occupied France. American-style music (like jazz and jitterbug dances) was banned by the Nazis, so French natives met in underground clubs that they called discotheques where records were often played on just a single turntable. After the war, these clubs came out into the open. One famous Paris discotheque was called “Whiskey a Gogo”. In that Paris disco, non-stop music was played using two turntables next to a dance-floor, and this concept spread around the world.

18 McFlurry mix-in : OREO

A McFlurry is an ice cream dessert served in McDonald’s restaurants. A McFlurry is made from soft-serve ice cream, to which are added crushed candy bars or cookies. Cleverly, a McFlurry is mixed on a machine with the mixing blade then doubling as a spoon with which one eats it.

19 Furniture giant : IKEA

The IKEA furniture stores use the colors blue and yellow for brand recognition. Blue and yellow are the national colors of Sweden, where IKEA was founded and is headquartered.

20 Bad flight forecast : SLEET

Apparently, “sleet” is a term used to describe two different weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets that are smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls.

29 WhatsApp transmissions, briefly : IMS

WhatsApp is a popular messaging service used on smartphones that sends messages and other files from one mobile phone number to another. Launched in 2011, WhatsApp is incredibly popular, and indeed the most popular messaging service used today. Facebook acquired WhatsApp in 2014, paying over $19 billion.

33 Sean of “Stranger Things” : ASTIN

Sean Astin is best known for playing the title role in the 1993 film “Rudy” and the character Samwise Gamgee in “The Lord of the Rings” movies. You might also have seen him playing Lynn McGill in the 5th season of “24”. Astin is the son of actress Patty Duke, and the adopted son of actor John Astin (of “The Addams Family” fame).

34 Part of an M.C.’s intro, often : BIO

The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism used for a Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

36 Prohibition target : DEMON RUM

The 18th Amendment to the US Constitution was a great victory for the temperance movement (the “dry” movement), and in 1919 ushered in the Prohibition era. Highly unpopular (with the “wet” movement), Prohibition was repealed in 1933 by the 21st Amendment.

40 Economizing, as represented twice in 12-Down? : PINCHING PENNIES (pinching two “CENT”s)

The official name of our smallest denomination coin is “cent”, and our use of the word “penny” is just a colloquialism derived from the British coin of the same name. In the UK, the plural of penny is “pence”, whereas we have “pennies” in our pockets.

45 “The Crown” role : DIANA

“The Crown” is a historical drama produced for Netflix that covers the life of British Queen Elizabeth II from her marriage to Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. For the first two seasons, Elizabeth is played by Claire Foy and Philip by Matt Smith. For the next two seasons, Olivia Colman and Tobias Menzies take over as Elizabeth and Philip. The show finishes up with Imelda Staunton and Jonathan Pryce in the roles.

47 Offering from Dr. Mom, in brief : TLC

Tender loving care (TLC)

48 Senior partners? : PROM DATES

A prom is a formal dance held upon graduation from high school (we call them “formals” over in Ireland). The term “prom” is short for “promenade”, the name given to a type of dance or ball.

50 ___ Hill, neighborhood of San Francisco : NOB

Nob Hill is a very elevated and central location in the city of San Francisco. Because of its views of the surrounding city and environs, Nob Hill became a desirable place to live for the wealthy in the 1800s. The area is still one of San Francisco’s most affluent neighborhoods and is home to upscale hotels as well as the magnificent Grace Cathedral. The name “Nob Hill” comes from the slang term for someone who is well-to-do, a “nob”.

51 Bussing on a bus, for short : PDA

Public display of affection (PDA)

To buss is to kiss.

54 Memorable mission : ALAMO

The San Antonio mission known as the Alamo may have been named for a grove of nearby cottonwood trees. “Álamo” is the Spanish name for the cottonwood.

64 Scrapbooker’s project : ALBUM

The Latin word “album” translates as “white”. Back in the 17th century, public notices and lists of names were written on a board painted white, or in a souvenir book with white pages known as an “albo” (from “album”). Over time, the term “album” came to be used in English for a blank book created to collect signatures or other mementos. By the end of the 19th century, albums were used to collect photographs. The term “album” was applied to long-playing gramophone records in the early 1950s, because the record sleeves resembled large photographic albums.

69 Shield of ancient Greece: Var. : EGIS

Someone is said to be under the aegis (also “egis”) of someone else if that other person provides protection, or perhaps sponsorship. The word “aegis” comes from the Greek word for a goat (“aigis”). The idea is that the goatskin shield or breastplate, worn by both Zeus and Athena, gave some measure of protection.

73 Manhattan is one: Abbr. : ISL

The island we know as Manhattan was inhabited by the Lenape Indians when the first Europeans explorers arrived in the area. According to the logbook of one of the officers on explorer Henry Hudson’s yacht, the island was called “Manna-hata” in the local language, from which the modern name derives.

83 Fencer’s score : TOUCH

The French word for sword is “épée”. In competitive fencing the épée is connected to a system that records an electrical signal when legal contact is made on an opponent’s body.

87 Confidentiality contract, for short : NDA

Non-disclosure agreement (NDA)

91 Cellist’s need : ROSIN

Rosin is a solid form of resin derived from plant sources. Rosin is formed into cakes that players of stringed instruments use to rub along the hairs of their bows to help improve sound quality. The rosin increases the degree of friction between the strings and the bow. That same friction-increasing property comes into play when baseball pitchers use rosin to get a better grip on the ball, or when dancers apply rosin to the soles of their shoes.

94 Economizing, as represented in 58-Down? : STRETCHING A BUCK (stretching a “SINGLE”)
[58D Not in a relationship : SINGLE]

“Buck” is a slang word meaning “dollar”. The term has been around at least since 1856, and is thought to derive from the tradition of using buckskin as a unit of trade with Native Americans during the frontier days.

99 Unwelcome, so to speak : NON GRATA

A persona non grata (plural “personae non gratae”) is someone who is not welcome. The phrase is Latin for “an unacceptable person”. The opposite phrase is “persona grata”, meaning “acceptable person”.

103 Like some modern maps : GENOMIC

The genome is all the hereditary information needed to reproduce an organism, in other words, all of its chromosomes. When scientists unravel the human genome, it takes up an awful lot of computer storage space, and yet all of this information is in almost every cell in our bodies. Each and every cell “knows” how to make a whole human being.

105 Golfer Palmer, to fans : ARNIE

Arnold Palmer was one of the greats of the world of golf. He was very popular with many fans of the game, and his followers were usually referred to as “Arnie’s Army”. Off the course, Palmer was an avid pilot until his latter years. He resided in Latrobe, Pennsylvania for much of the year and the local airport is named in his honor: Arnold Palmer Regional Airport.

106 A/C meas. : BTU

In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured using the British Thermal Unit (BTU). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

109 “The Planets” composer : HOLST

Despite the Scandinavian-sounding name, Gustav Holst was born in Britain and was the most English of classical composers. His most famous work is the orchestral suite known as ‘The Planets”. The suite has seven movements, one for each of the planets known at the time (1914-1916) except Earth. Pluto was discovered during Holst’s lifetime, but decades after he had completed his masterpiece. Anyway, Pluto was relegated from the league of planets …

116 Ditto, in legal footnotes : IDEM

“Idem” is usually abbreviated as “id.” and is the Latin word for “the same”. In research papers, “idem” is used in a list of references, in place of citations “already mentioned above”.

118 Word that means “ocean” in a religious title : DALAI

The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

119 Large crowd : HORDE

A horde is a large crowd. “Horde” ultimately derives from the Turkish “ordu” meaning “camp, army”.

122 Classical poem : EPODE

An epode is a lyric poem made up of couplets in which the first line is long, and the second line much shorter. The form was invented by the Greek poet Archilochus, and was most famously used by the Roman poet Horace.

123 Beast with recurved horns : IBEX

“Ibex” is a common name for various species of mountain goat. “Ibex” is a Latin name that was used for wild goats found in the Alps and Apennines in Europe.

127 Smokey spot, for short : PSA

Public service announcement (PSA)

Smokey Bear is the mascot of the US Forest Service. Smokey first appeared in 1944, in an advertising campaign directed towards preventing forest fires.

Down

2 “How ___ Your Mother” : I MET

“How I Met Your Mother” is a sitcom that CBS has been airing since 2005. The main character is Ted Mosby, played by Josh Radnor. Mosby is also the narrator for the show looking back from the year 2030 (the live action is set in the present). As narrator, the older Mosby character is voiced by Bob Saget.

4 Some garlic prep : MINCING

Our word “garlic” evolved via Old English from “gar” (spear) and “leac” (leek). The use of “spear” is apparently a reference to the shape of a clove.

6 Maker of the Nitro 5 gaming laptop : ACER

Acer is a Taiwanese company that I visited a couple of times when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, although I have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

7 “The year’s at the spring / And day’s at the ___”: Robert Browning : MORN

Robert Browning met fellow poet Elizabeth Barrett in 1845. Elizabeth was a sickly woman, confined to her parents’ house in Wimpole Street in London, largely due to the conservative and protective nature of her father. Robert and Elizabeth eventually eloped in 1846, and lived in self-inflicted exile in Italy. Away from the country of his birth, Browning was moved to write his now famous “Home Thoughts, From Abroad”, the first line of which is “Oh, to be in England …”

8 Yankees manager before Girardi : TORRE

As a manager, Joe Torre was part of four World Series wins, all of them with the New York Yankees baseball team. Torre is an Italian American who was born in Brooklyn, New York. During the run up (pun intended!) to the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Torre carried the Olympic flame part of the way through Florence in Italy, handing it over to the next runner at the famous Ponte Vecchio. I’d guess that was quite a thrill for him …

10 C-note : BEN

Benjamin Franklin’s portrait is featured on one side of the hundred-dollar bill (also called a “C-spot, C-note, benjamin”), and Philadelphia’s Independence Hall on the other side. There is a famous error in the image of Independence Hall. If you look closely at the clock face at the top of the building you can see that the “four” is written in Roman numerals as “IV”. However, on the actual clock on Independence Hall, the “four” is denoted by “IIII”, which has been the convention for clock faces for centuries.

13 It helps make a stew a goo : OKRA

The plant known as okra is mainly grown for its edible green pods. The pods are said to resemble “ladies’ fingers”, which is an alternative name for the plant. Okra is known as “ngombo” in Bantu, a name that might give us the word “gumbo”, the name for the name of the southern Louisiana stew that includes okra as a key ingredient.

15 Garnish for una margarita : SAL

No one seems to know for sure who first created the margarita cocktail. The most plausible and oft-quoted is that it was invented in 1941 in Ensenada, Mexico. The barman mixed the drink for an important visitor, the daughter of the German ambassador. The daughter’s name was Margarita Henkel, and she lent her name to the new drink. The basic recipe for a margarita is a mixture of tequila, orange-flavored liqueur (like Cointreau) and lime juice.

20 Poli ___ : SCI

Political science (poli sci)

25 Reply to the Little Red Hen : NOT I

“The Little Red Hen” is an old folk tale, probably from Russia. In the story, the little red hen finds a grain of wheat and asks for help to plant it. “Not I” is the response she gets, repeatedly. She does the work herself, eventually baking bread from the harvested grain. She asks for help in eating the bread, and gets lots of volunteers. But, the hen decides to save the bread for herself and her chicks, seeing as no one would help her plant the wheat in the first place.

32 Cancún cash : PESOS

Cancún is a city and island on the east coast of Mexico, on the other side of the Yucatan Channel from Cuba. The city is growing rapidly due to its booming tourist business. Cancún is the center of what’s often called “The Mexican Caribbean” or the “Mayan Riviera”.

33 Hamburger’s beef? : ACH!

The German exclamation “ach!” is usually translated into English as “oh!”

Hamburg is the second-largest city in Germany (after Berlin), and the third largest port in Europe (after Rotterdam and Antwerp).

35 Like some ancient pyramids : INCAN

Inca pyramids were typically located at the center of a community. They were symbolic of power and often had an altar that was used for rituals.

38 Quelques-___ (some, in French) : UNES

Quelques-unes is the feminine form of “some” in French. The masculine version would be “quelques-uns”.

39 Quantity multiplied by acceleration in Newton’s second law : MASS

Newton’s second law of motion tells us that a body accelerates when a force is applied to it, and the greater the mass of the object, the greater the force required to cause that acceleration. Mathematically, the law can be written as Force = mass x acceleration (F=ma).

40 Pioneer in global aviation : PAN AM

Pan American World Airways (usually just “Pan Am”) started out as a mail and passenger service between Key West, Florida and Havana, Cuba in 1927. From very early in the company’s life it was the de facto representative air carrier of the United States. For many years, Pan Am’s fleet was built around the Boeing 314 Clipper, a long-range flying boat that was one of the largest aircraft around at the time. Pan Am adopted the Clipper as part of its image, even using “clipper” as the call sign for its flights.

43 Educ. supporter : PTA

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

44 Once-popular devices discontinued in 2022 : IPODS

The iPod is Apple’s discontinued signature line of portable media players. The iPod first hit the market in 2001 with a hard drive-based device, now known as the iPod Classic. Later models all used flash memory, allowing a smaller form factor. The smallest of the flash-based models is the iPod Shuffle, which was introduced in 2005.

49 Cousin of a weasel : MARTEN

Martens are weasel-like carnivores with yellowish to dark-brown fur. That fur is relatively thick, and is valued by fur trappers.

55 Farmyard cry : MAA!

“Maa” is the call of a goat.

59 “The Last O.G.” network : TBS

“The Last O.G.” is a sitcom starring Tracy Morgan. Morgan plays the title character, an “original gangster or OG”, who is released from prison after serving 15 years. The ex-con returns to his Brooklyn neighborhood to find it very different, 15 years on. And, his ex-girlfriend is raising his twin children with her husband. I haven’t seen this one, but the premise sounds intriguing …

61 Vile Nile reptile : ASP

The venomous snake called an asp was a symbol of royalty in ancient Egypt.

66 Foreign leader whom Nixon met in 1972 : MAO

President Richard Nixon made a famous visit to China in 1972 that marked a thawing in the relationship between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC). It was the first time that a US president had visited the PRC, and followed several secret diplomatic missions to Beijing by National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger. During the week-long visit, President Nixon had talks with Chairman Mao Zedong, and First Lady Pat Nixon was very visible as she toured schools, hospitals and factories.

70 Kind of knife of infomercial fame : GINSU

Ginsu knives are more famous for their hard-sell television ads than they are for their efficacy in the kitchen. The Ginsu phenomenon took off in the seventies when two brothers found a set of knives called “Eversharp” that were being manufactured in Ohio. The brothers changed the brand name to something more exotic, and Japanese in particular (Ginsu), and then produced ads that made references to Japanese martial arts. I think they made a fortune …

71 Like Urdu or Hindi : INDIC

Urdu is one of the two official languages of Pakistan (the other being English), and is one of the 22 scheduled languages in India. Urdu partly developed from Persian and is written from right to left.

Hindi is one of the two official languages of India, along with English. Hindi is the fourth most-spoken first language in the world (after Mandarin, Spanish and English).

76 Montana city SW of Helena : BUTTE

The city of Butte, Montana was founded as a mining town in the late 1800s. Although mining brought great growth to the area, it also brought environmental problems. Today, Butte is home to the country’s largest Superfund cleanup site.

78 The main antagonist? : PIRATE SHIP

When one thinks of the word “main”, in the context of the sea, the Spanish Main usually comes to mind. Indeed, the use of the more general term “main” to mean “sea”, originates from the more specific “Spanish Main”. “Spanish Main” originally referred to land and not water, as it was the name given to the mainland coast around the Caribbean Sea in the days of Spanish domination of the region.

80 ___ facto : IPSO

“Ipso facto” is Latin, a phrase meaning “by the fact itself”. It describes something that is a direct consequence of a particular act, as opposed to something that is the result of some subsequent event. For example, my father was born in Dublin and was an Irish citizen, ipso facto. My son was born in California and is an Irish citizen by virtue of being the son of an Irish citizen (i.e. “not” ipso facto).

82 Relish : GUSTO

“Gusto” is an Italian word meaning “taste”. We use it in English in the phrase “with gusto” meaning “with great enjoyment”.

84 Plant whose name derives from Quechua : COCA

The coca plant is native to South America and is similar in appearance to a blackthorn bush. Coca leaves have been chewed by humans for centuries, perhaps even as far back as 3,000 years ago. Chewing the leaves apparently produces a pleasurable numb sensation in the mouth and a pleasant taste. The most famous alkaloid in the leaf is cocaine, but this wasn’t extracted in its pure form until the mid-1800s. The extracted cocaine was used in medicines and tonics and other beverages.

Quechua was the Native-American language adopted by the Incan Empire and favored over other dialects. Today, Quechua is one of the official languages in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador, alongside Spanish.

92 Pros with deliveries, in brief : OBS

Obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN)

95 Painter Jan van ___ : EYCK

The artist Jan van Eyck lived most of his life in Bruges, which has to be the most beautiful city in Belgium. One of his most famous works is “The Arnolfini Portrait”, which hangs in the National Gallery in London.

97 Civil rights icon ___ Helen Burroughs : NANNIE

Nannie Helen Burroughs was an African-American civil rights activist and teacher who was active in the first half of the 20th century. Burroughs is remembered for a life spent fighting for civil rights, and in particular for a speech she delivered at the National Baptist Convention in 1900 known as “How the Sisters Are Hindered from Helping”.

104 Shakespeare’s “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” has five of them : IAMBS

An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The lines in William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 18” use five sequential iambs, e.g. “Shall I / compare / thee to / a sum- / -mer’s day?” With that sequence of five iambs, the poem’s structure is described as iambic pentameter.

106 Liberal arts college in Kentucky : BEREA

Berea College is located in Berea, Kentucky, just south of Lexington. It is a remarkable university that is focused on providing a low-cost education to students from low-income families. There are no tuition fees and instead students must work at least ten hours a week on campus and in service jobs. Berea was also the first college in the Southern US to become coeducational and the first to become racially integrated.

107 Locally focused lecture franchise : TEDX

The acronym “TED” stands for “Technology, Entertainment and Design”. TED is a set of conferences held around the world by a non-profit group called the Sapling Foundation. The conference subjects are varied, and the meetings are often led by big names such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Bill Gates and Jane Goodall. The Sapling Foundation then makes recordings of the conferences available for free online with the intent of disseminating the ideas globally. These conferences are known as “TED Talks”. There are also TEDx events, which are locally-run talks presented under license from TED.

108 Pac-12 player : UTE

The Utah Utes are the athletic teams of the University of Utah.

109 Santa’s favorite Hostess dessert? : HO HO

Ho Hos snack cakes were first produced in San Francisco in 1967. The “Happy Ho Ho” mascot was created for the brand in the 1970s, and was a cartoon character in a Robin Hood outfit. Ho Hos weren’t the best thing to come out of the sixties I’d say …

110 Wilson of film : OWEN

Actor Owen Wilson was nominated for an Oscar, but not for his acting. He was nominated for co-writing the screenplay for “The Royal Tenenbaums” along with Wes Anderson.

117 Grammy winner ___ Lipa : DUA

Dua Lipa is a singer-songwriter and fashion model from England. She was born in London to Albanian parents, and considers her native language to be Albanian. She also speaks English with a British accent.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Become hysterical, with “out” : WIG …
4 Elided title : MA’AM
8 Restaurant competitor of Pinkberry and Sweet Frog : TCBY
12 Catchy tunes, informally : BOPS
16 Sigh of lament : AH ME
17 Where dancers have a ball? : DISCO
18 McFlurry mix-in : OREO
19 Furniture giant : IKEA
20 Bad flight forecast : SLEET
21 Reason : INFER
22 Hierarchy level : RUNG
23 Certain U.S. time zone : CENTRAL
24 Economizing, as represented by the circled squares? : CUTTING CORNERS (with a SAW & AXE)
27 “The bad news is …” : I FEAR …
29 WhatsApp transmissions, briefly : IMS
30 Navy nay : NO, SIR
31 Seizes eagerly, as an opportunity : LEAPS ON
33 Sean of “Stranger Things” : ASTIN
34 Part of an M.C.’s intro, often : BIO
36 Prohibition target : DEMON RUM
40 Economizing, as represented twice in 12-Down? : PINCHING PENNIES (pinching two “CENT”s)
45 “The Crown” role : DIANA
46 Colorful kind of shirt : ALOHA
47 Offering from Dr. Mom, in brief : TLC
48 Senior partners? : PROM DATES
50 ___ Hill, neighborhood of San Francisco : NOB
51 Bussing on a bus, for short : PDA
54 Memorable mission : ALAMO
56 “You’ve made your point,” slangily : SAY LESS
57 Lead-in to an opinion : AS I SEE IT …
60 Zip : NADA
62 From not so long ago : RECENT
63 Parts of a gig : MEGS
64 Scrapbooker’s project : ALBUM
67 Honesty, resilience or a sense of humor, perhaps : ASSET
69 Shield of ancient Greece: Var. : EGIS
73 Manhattan is one: Abbr. : ISL
75 Attempt : STAB
77 Work that hasn’t yet entered publication : PREPRINT
79 Little squealer : MINI PIG
83 Fencer’s score : TOUCH
86 Hebrew version of the English pronoun “I” : ANI
87 Confidentiality contract, for short : NDA
88 Welcome event : OPEN HOUSE
90 ___ drag (hockey maneuver) : TOE
91 Cellist’s need : ROSIN
93 In concert : AS ONE
94 Economizing, as represented in 58-Down? : STRETCHING A BUCK (stretching a “SINGLE”)
99 Unwelcome, so to speak : NON GRATA
101 Vote in favor : YEA
102 Trading places : MARTS
103 Like some modern maps : GENOMIC
105 Golfer Palmer, to fans : ARNIE
106 A/C meas. : BTU
109 “The Planets” composer : HOLST
111 Economizing, as represented by the shaded squares? : MAKING ENDS MEET (making “BUM, ASS, CAN, BUTT” meet)
115 Bad-sounding creatures? : FOWL
116 Ditto, in legal footnotes : IDEM
118 Word that means “ocean” in a religious title : DALAI
119 Large crowd : HORDE
120 It’s cried on a slide : WHEE!
121 Check : CURB
122 Classical poem : EPODE
123 Beast with recurved horns : IBEX
124 Triumphant shout at a crossword tournament : DONE!
125 Freshness : SASS
126 Like some morning lawns : DEWY
127 Smokey spot, for short : PSA

Down

1 Sharpens : WHETS
2 “How ___ Your Mother” : I MET
3 Work out : GET IN SHAPE
4 Some garlic prep : MINCING
5 Regarding : AS FOR
6 Maker of the Nitro 5 gaming laptop : ACER
7 “The year’s at the spring / And day’s at the ___”: Robert Browning : MORN
8 Yankees manager before Girardi : TORRE
9 Zealous activist : CRUSADER
10 C-note : BEN
11 Tranquil discipline : YOGISM
12 Former name of a Kansas arena that commemorated a 1976 U.S. anniversary : BICENTENNIAL CENTER
13 It helps make a stew a goo : OKRA
14 Poached fruit : PEAR
15 Garnish for una margarita : SAL
16 Source of many a name on a campus building, informally : ALUM
17 Starts eating : DIGS IN
20 Poli ___ : SCI
25 Reply to the Little Red Hen : NOT I
26 Name hidden in “before long” : ELON
28 It makes a red velvet cake red : FOOD DYE
32 Cancún cash : PESOS
33 Hamburger’s beef? : ACH!
34 Word with pepper or tower : BELL …
35 Like some ancient pyramids : INCAN
37 Acceleration, e.g. : RATE
38 Quelques-___ (some, in French) : UNES
39 Quantity multiplied by acceleration in Newton’s second law : MASS
40 Pioneer in global aviation : PAN AM
41 Words of defeat : I LOSE
42 “Don’t sweat it,” informally : NO BIG
43 Educ. supporter : PTA
44 Once-popular devices discontinued in 2022 : IPODS
49 Cousin of a weasel : MARTEN
52 “What’s the ___?” (“‘Sup with that?”) : DEALIO
53 Suffer : AIL
55 Farmyard cry : MAA!
58 Not in a relationship : SINGLE
59 “The Last O.G.” network : TBS
61 Vile Nile reptile : ASP
65 Out-and-out : UTTER
66 Foreign leader whom Nixon met in 1972 : MAO
68 That’s history! : ERA
70 Kind of knife of infomercial fame : GINSU
71 Like Urdu or Hindi : INDIC
72 Was very ripe : STANK
74 Round figures : SPHERES
76 Montana city SW of Helena : BUTTE
78 The main antagonist? : PIRATE SHIP
79 [Ugh, this is horrible!] : [MOAN!]
80 ___ facto : IPSO
81 Like some highlighter colors : NEON
82 Relish : GUSTO
84 Plant whose name derives from Quechua : COCA
85 Devious snicker : HEH!
89 Barely gets the words out : STAMMERS
92 Pros with deliveries, in brief : OBS
95 Painter Jan van ___ : EYCK
96 “Let’s do this!” : I’M READY!
97 Civil rights icon ___ Helen Burroughs : NANNIE
98 Power structure? : GRID
100 Capers : ANTICS
104 Shakespeare’s “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” has five of them : IAMBS
105 Beaming, as with joy : AGLOW
106 Liberal arts college in Kentucky : BEREA
107 Locally focused lecture franchise : TEDX
108 Pac-12 player : UTE
109 Santa’s favorite Hostess dessert? : HO HO
110 Wilson of film : OWEN
112 Carded at a bar, informally : ID’ED
113 Common spot for a sunburn : NAPE
114 Gaggles : MOBS
115 Chain email abbr. : FWD
117 Grammy winner ___ Lipa : DUA

13 thoughts on “0212-23 NY Times Crossword 12 Feb 23, Sunday”

  1. 46:14, no errors. Lost time putting IBID in 116A before IDEM. Then had to figure out that 12D required two rebuses for the finished puzzle to be accepted.

  2. 33:26 with a few errors in the lower middle section. Had “nose” as a place easy to get a sunburn rather than NAPE which led to an EPOsE (unfamiliar with EPODE) and the famous DoLAI Lama which I just didn’t notice.

    Clever and convoluted theme but I liked it.

    Tough cluing all around. EGIS made me wonder if there was a rebus there too as I frequently see AEGIS in puzzles but never EGIS. Hamburger’s beef being ACH threw me until I came here. INDIC did too.

    Best –

  3. Like Duncan R, I never caught on to the “cents,” which not hinted at anywhere in the clues that I could see. A bit to gimmicky for my taste.

    1. @Sylvie …

      The hint is at 40-Across (“Economizing, as represented twice in 12-Down?” for “PINCHING PENNIES”).

      That said, it took me a long time to finally understand the hint and see to where (and how) to fit two pennies into the answer for 12-Down. (According to my records, I finished in 48:15. It’s possible that some of that was “walkaway” time, but I remember being frustrated for quite a while.)

    2. … to finally understand the hint and to see where (and how) to fit …

      I wish we still had a short time in which to edit our posts and correct obvious errors (sigh …😳).

  4. Aced it😃
    Fun puzzle which took me plenty of time and energy to piece together. Lots of different rebus wrinkles to iron out.
    I took third place in last night’s poker tournament.👍🏼
    Time to celebrate with a Margarita Henkel con sal!

  5. DNF. the whole NE corner got me. Until I came here and realized I had the hint from 40A but I totally forgot.

    I knew the answer for 12D had to have some kind of BICENTENNIAL thing but what could it be??? Hmmm. (As I’m hitting a hammer on my head with the word BICENTENNIAL on it) hmmmmmmm.

  6. 9 squares wrong. I stopped the clock at 4257:59. I came back to it over a period of 3 days. I got the rebus for biCENTennial but forgot the second one for CENTer. I got the SSIINGle thing. Weird.
    I found this puzzle harder than your usual Sunday NYT puzzle, and quirkier.

  7. How do you enter the “cent” online for 12D rebus? I can only enter one letter and the solution won’t accept the puzzle as complete.

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