0703-22 NY Times Crossword 3 Jul 22, Sunday

Constructed by: Tom McCoy
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Expansion Pack

There is a note with today’s puzzle:

Seven clues in this puzzle relate to their answers in a manner for you to discover. Standard clues for these answers appear below in mixed order. • Accounting total • Communicating (with) • Leg cramp • Peyton, to Eli Manning • Showing gratitude • Unlikely election winner • Where golfers practice short strokes

Themed answers are EXPANDED from phrases that start with a homophone of a letter. Those answer are clued in the note above:

  • Accounting total:
    23A Direct path : BOTTOM LINE (beeline/B-line expanded)
  • Peyton, to Eli Manning
    29A “Sheesh!” : OLDER BROTHER (oh, brother/O-brother expanded)
  • Where golfers practice short strokes
    41A Color of the Owl and Pussy-cat’s boat : PUTTING GREEN (pea green/P-green expanded)
  • Communicating (with)
    63A Something avoided during awkward situations : IN CONTACT (eye contact/I-contact expanded)
  • Leg cramp
    84A Fish with a prehensile tail : CHARLEY HORSE (seahorse/C-horse expanded)
  • Showing gratitude
    97A “Oh, that’s so nice of you to say!” : GIVING THANKS (Gee, thanks!/G-thanks expanded)
  • Unlikely election winner
    105A Mad Hatter’s social event : THIRD PARTY (tea party/T-party expanded)

Bill’s time: 18m 52s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Host of the 1952 Winter Olympics : OSLO

The 1952 Winter Olympic Games took place in Oslo, Norway. One of the firsts at the 1952 games was the first use of a purpose-built athletes’ village. The 1952 Games also marked the return of Japan and Germany to the Olympic family after being excluded from the 1948 games following WWII.

10 Beatles song with an exclamation mark in its title : HELP!

Although credited to Lennon-McCartney, the title song to the 1965 Beatles movie “Help!” was composed by John Lennon, with some assistance from Paul McCartney. Lennon later described the song as one of his most honest and genuine songs. He said, “I was fat and depressed and I was crying out for ‘Help’”.

19 Demeter’s mother, in myth : RHEA

In Greek mythology, Demeter was the goddess of the harvest. Her Roman equivalent was Ceres.

20 Singer/songwriter Jones : NORAH

The beguiling Norah Jones is the daughter of famed sitar virtuoso Ravi Shankar, and is one of my favorite singers. If you haven’t heard Jones singing her song “Come Away with Me”, you just haven’t lived …

21 Abbr. on a “works cited” list : ET AL

“Et alii” (et al.) is the equivalent of “et cetera” (etc.), with “et cetera” being used in place of a list of objects, and “et alii” used for a list of names.

22 Kemper of “The Office” : ELLIE

Actress Ellie Kemper’s big break came with the role of Erin Hannon, a receptionist on the sitcom “The Office”. More recently, Kemper played the title role in the Netflix comedy series “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”.

23 Direct path : BOTTOM LINE (beeline/B-line expanded)

To make a beeline for somewhere or something, one takes a direct route. The term derives from the excellent homing instinct of bees.

25 Lot of land, say : ACRE

At one time, an acre was defined as the amount of land a yoke of oxen could plow in a day. Then, an acre was more precisely defined as a strip of land “one furrow long” (i.e. one furlong) and one chain wide. The length of one furlong was equal to 10 chains, or 40 rods. An area of one furlong times 10 rods was one rood.

26 Director Frank : CAPRA

I can’t tell you how many of Frank Capra’s movies are on my list of all-time favorites. He directed such classics as “It Happened One Night”, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town”, “Lost Horizon”, “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”, “Meet John Doe”, “Arsenic and Old Lace” and the holiday favorite “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Capra was the first person to win three directorial Oscars: for “It Happened One Night”, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town” and “You Can’t Take It With You”. Capra also did his bit during WWII, enlisting just a few days after Pearl Harbor was attacked. Given his great talent, and the fact that he enlisted at the relatively advanced age of 44, the US Army put him to work directing 11 documentary war films in the “Why We Fight” series, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

27 Sea plea : SOS

The combination of three dots – three dashes – three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots – pause – three dashes – pause – three dots). That said, in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so “SOS” is really only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases “Save Our Souls” and “Save Our Ship” are back-formations that were introduced after the SOS signal was adopted.

32 Like some cheese … or some movies : GRATED … or G-RATED

The Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) film-rating system (PG-13, R, etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

36 Rathskeller decoration : STEIN

A city hall in Germany is called a Rathaus. In days gone by there was often a restaurant located in the basement or cellar of a Rathaus, and this restaurant was given the name Rathskeller.

38 Anthropologist’s adjective : ETHNIC

Anthropology is the scientific study of human beings, both in the present and in the past. The term “anthropology” combines the Greek “anthropos” (meaning “human”) and “logos” (meaning “study”).

40 Small bits of dough : ONES

Conspiracy theorists love to point out “suspicious” symbols on the one-dollar bill. The pyramid on the bill is unfinished, with 13 steps. The number 13 has been associated with the occult, but it is also the number of original colonies that declared independence from Britain forming the United States. Not so suspicious after all …

41 Color of the Owl and Pussy-cat’s boat : PUTTING GREEN (pea green/P-green expanded)

“The Owl and the Pussycat” is a poem by Edward Lear first published in 1871. It tells of an owl and a pussycat who set out to sea in a pea-green boat with honey and plenty of money wrapped in a five pound note.

48 ___ Mysteries (children’s series starting with “The Absent Author”) : A TO Z

“A to Z Mysteries” is a series of children’s books penned by Ron Roy. The stories feature a trio of 9-year-old child detectives named Dink, Josh and Ruth.

52 Wimple wearer : NUN

A wimple is a garment worn mainly in medieval Europe by women. The wimple covers the back of the head, neck and chin. It was tradition back then for genteel women to cover their hair. In modern times, habits worn by nuns include wimples.

56 Panache : FLAIR

Someone exhibiting panache is showing dash and verve, and perhaps has a swagger. “Panache” is a French word used for a plume of feathers, especially one in a hat.

59 Symbol of Middle America : PEORIA

Peoria is the oldest European settlement in the state of Illinois, having been settled by the French in 1680. The city is famous for being cited as “the average American city”. The phrase, “Will it play in Peoria?” is used to mean, “Will it appeal to the mainstream?” It is believed the expression originated as a corruption of, “We shall play in Peoria”, a line used by some actors in the 1890 novel “Five Hundred Dollars” by Horatio Alger, Jr.

67 Isolated hill : BUTTE

“What’s the difference between a butte and a mesa?” Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, and taller than it is wide.

73 Fictional Mr. or real Dr. : SPOCK

Leonard Nimoy played the logical Mr. Spock in the original “Star Trek” television series. Spock has to be the most popular character on the show, and he kept popping up in “Star Trek” spin offs. Nimoy first worked alongside William Shatner (Captain Kirk) in an episode of “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” (I loved that show as a kid!), with Nimoy playing a bad guy and Shatner playing an U.N.C.L.E. recruit.

Dr. Benjamin Spock owes his fame to his 1946 best-selling book “Baby and Child Care”. For over fifty years, “Baby and Child Care” sold more books than any other, except for the Bible.

81 Cocktail made with ginger beer : MULE

A Moscow mule is a cocktail made from vodka, ginger beer and lime. I like the occasional Moscow mule, mainly because ginger beer was my soda of choice as a kid. Vodka … not so much …

84 Fish with a prehensile tail : CHARLEY HORSE (seahorse/C-horse expanded)

“Charley horse” is a very American term for painful muscle spasms in the legs. The term possibly arose in the late 19th century, and may be named for baseball pitcher Charlie “Old Hoss” Radbourn who apparently suffered a lot from leg cramps.

Seahorses belong to the genus Hippocampus. The genus name comes from the Greek “hippo” meaning “horse” and “kampos” meaning “sea monster”. It’s the male seahorse who carries the fertilized eggs, and not the females. The region of the brain known as the hippocampus, is so called because it resembles a seahorse in shape.

A part of the body that is described as prehensile is adapted for grasping. Examples would be an elephant’s trunk and a monkey’s tail.

87 Symbols of wave functions : PSIS

A wave function in quantum mechanics is usually denoted with the Greek letter psi. It is a mathematical function that describes the quantum state of a particle and how it behaves.

88 One of the Furies of Greek myth : ALECTO

The Furies of Greek and Roman mythology were the female personification of vengeance. They were also known as the Dirae, “the terrible”. There were at least three Furies:

  • Alecto: the “unceasing”
  • Megaera: the “grudging”
  • Tisiphone: the “avenging murder”

94 Excoriate : SCATHE

To excoriate is to abrade or chafe. “Excoriate” also means “to strongly denounce something or someone”.

99 Disney+ competitor : HULU

Hulu is a video-on-demand service. Although competing directly with Netflix and Amazon Prime, Hulu’s primary focus is the streaming of television shows rather than movies.

103 Revise : AMEND

The verb “to amend” means “to change for the better, put right, alter by adding”. The related verb “to emend” is used more rarely, and mainly in reference to the editing of professional writing. Both terms are derived from the Latin “emendare” meaning “to remove fault”.

105 Mad Hatter’s social event : THIRD PARTY (tea party/T-party expanded)

In Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”, the Mad Hatter makes his first appearance in a chapter called “A Mad Tea-Party”. This event is usually described as “The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party”, even though the Mad Hatter was just a guest. The host was the March Hare. In fact, the phrase “Mad Hatter” doesn’t appear anywhere in Lewis Carroll’s novel, although the character, the Hatter (and sometimes “Hatta”), is described as “mad”.

108 9 a.m. service : TERCE

In the Roman Catholic tradition, there is an official set of daily prayers known as the Liturgy of the Hours. The traditional list of prayers is:

  • Matins (during the night, or at midnight)
  • Lauds or Dawn Prayer (Dawn, or 3 a.m.)
  • Prime or Early Morning Prayer (First Hour, or 6 a.m.)
  • Terce or Mid-Morning Prayer (Third Hour, or 9 a.m.)
  • Sext or Midday Prayer (Sixth Hour, or 12 noon)
  • None or Mid-Afternoon Prayer (Ninth Hour, or 3 p.m.)
  • Vespers or Evening Prayer (“at the lighting of the lamps”, or 6 p.m.)
  • Compline or Night Prayer (before retiring, generally at 9 p.m.)

110 Falcon’s home : AERIE

There are about 40 species of the birds of prey classed as falcons, with examples being several species of kestrel. Falcons differ from hawks and eagles in that they kill their prey with their beaks, as opposed to their talons. Famously, falcons swoop down on their prey at great speed. Peregrine falcons have been clocked at well over 200 miles per hour, making them the fastest-moving creatures on the planet.

112 Fragrant compound : ESTER

Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic. Fats and oils found in nature are fatty acid esters of glycerol known as glycerides.

115 Online crafts market : ETSY

Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

Down

3 “Enough dillydallying!” : LET’S GET ON WITH IT!

To dillydally is to loiter, delay. The verb “to dally” also means “to linger, dawdle”, and so “dillydally” is simply a duplication of “dally”, one that dates back to the mid-1700s.

4 Kind of milk : OAT

Oat milk is one of the alternatives to cow’s milk, and is lactose free. I’m a big fan …

6 Nick of “48 Hrs.” : NOLTE

Actor Nick Nolte got his big break playing opposite Jacqueline Bisset and Robert Shaw in “The Deep”, a film released in 1976.

“48 HRS.” is a hilarious 1982 movie starring Eddie Murphy and Nick Nolte. Even though the lead characters play a convict and a cop who team up, “48 HRS.” is often cited as the first of the modern “buddy cop” movies, a precursor to the likes of “Beverly Hills Cop” and “Lethal Weapon”.

7 The yolk’s on them : FRIED EGGS

The yolk is the yellow part of a chicken’s egg. The term “yolk” comes from the Old English “geolu” meaning “yellow”.

8 ___ Malcolm, Jeff Goldblum’s role in “Jurassic Park” : IAN

“Jurassic Park” is a 1990 novel by Michael Crichton that was adapted into a hugely successful movie by Steven Spielberg in 1993. One of the main premises of the novel is that dinosaur DNA could be harvested from mosquitoes trapped in amber (fossilized tree resin), the DNA coming from the dinosaur blood consumed by the mosquitoes. The dinosaur DNA is then sequenced and used to create clones of the original beasts. Apparently, that’s a clever idea, but not very practical …

12 Big Bird? : LARRY

Larry Bird played basketball for the Boston Celtics from 1978 to 1992. Bird has a lot of very loyal fans, and some might even be described as fanatical. In 2005 an Oklahoma City man was convicted of a crime involving a shooting. On being sentenced to 30 years imprisonment, the guilty man requested that the sentence be changed to 33 years so that it matched the number on Larry Bird’s jersey. The judge obliged. Or so the story goes …

13 Ordinary citizen : PLEB

In ancient Rome, the patricians were the members of the families in the ruling classes. Those Romans who were not patricians by birth were known as plebs.

16 A as in Agamemnon : ALPHA

“Alpha” is the first letter of the Greek alphabet, and gave rise to our Latin letter “A”. In turn, alpha is derived from the Phoenician letter “aleph”.

Agamemnon was a figure in Greek mythology. He was the brother of Menelaus, who in turn was married to Helen. When Helen ran off with Paris to Troy, Agamemnon led the united Greek forces in the resulting Trojan War.

18 Lachrymose : TEARY

“Lachrymose” means “teary”, from the Latin “lacrima”, the word for “tear”.

24 Resident of a Mideast sultanate : OMANI

Qaboos bin Said al Said was Sultan of Oman, until his death in 2020, after coming to power in a coup in 1970 by deposing his own father. Qaboos had no children, and no agreed heir. After his death, the country’s Defense Council opened a letter left by Qaboos that named his successor, his cousin Haitham bin Tariq.

31 Melon parts : RINDS

Melons are plants with edible, fleshy fruits that are usually sweet. The fruit of a melon is actually a berry.

33 Brand that comes in short sleeves : RITZ

I’ve always liked Ritz crackers. They’ve been around since 1934 when they were introduced by Nabisco. The name Ritz was chosen because the marketing folks felt that the association with Ritz-Carlton would evoke images of wealth and the highlife.

37 Nobelist Desmond : TUTU

Desmond Tutu was a South African, a former Anglican bishop who was an outspoken opponent of apartheid. Tutu won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009, among other distinguished awards.

39 Syntactician’s drawing : TREE

Syntax is the way linguistic elements are assembled to form phrases and clauses. The term “syntax” comes from Greek via Latin, and ultimately from “syn” meaning “together” and “tassein” meaning “arrange”.

43 Flits here and there : GALLIVANTS

“Gallivant” is such a lovely word, and is probably a derivative of “gallant”. To gallivant is to gad about, to flirt, wander in search of pleasure or amusement. My mother was always accusing me of gallivanting when I was a youth …

44 Shenanigan : ANTIC

I suppose one might be forgiven for thinking that “shenanigan” is an Irish term, as it certainly sounds Irish. Usually written in the plural, shenanigans are acts of mischief, pranks. Apparently the word is of uncertain derivation, but was coined in San Francisco and Sacramento, California in the mid-1800s.

47 Animal aptly found in “feather one’s nest” : HERON

Herons are birds with long legs that inhabit freshwater and coastal locales. Some herons are routinely referred to as egrets, and others as bitterns. Herons look a lot like storks and cranes, but differ in their appearance in flight. Herons fly with their necks retracted in an S-shape, whereas storks and cranes have their necks extended.

54 Principle : TENET

A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “holds”.

62 Food often served with gari (pickled ginger) : SUSHI

“Gari” is the Japanese name for thinly-sliced ginger that is often served with sushi.

65 Frustrating device in an arcade : CLAW

Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

74 Dressage for a horseback rider? : POLO SHIRT

René Lacoste was a French tennis player who went into the clothing business, and came up with a more comfortable shirt that players could use. This became known as a “tennis shirt”. When it was adopted for use in the sport of polo, the shirts also became known as “polo shirts”. The “golf shirt” is basically the same thing. The Lacoste line of clothing features a crocodile logo, because René was nicknamed “The Crocodile”.

81 Wool-gatherer? : MOTH

The larvae of several types of moth are noted for eating fabrics made from natural fibers such as wool or cotton. Many people store woolens in cedar chests believing that the scent of the wood prevents a moth infestation. In fact, the only known effective repellent is the naphthalene found in mothballs, which might be a health concern for humans. One way to kill moth larvae in fabric is to freeze the garment for several days at a temperature below -8 degrees celsius.

84 Cacophony : CLANGOR

Our word “clangor”, meaning “loud ringing or clanging”, comes from the Latin word “clangor” that describes “the sound of trumpets or birds”.

“Cacophony” is such a lovely word, a word used to describe a harsh or jarring sound. The term arises from the Greek “kakos” (bad) and “phone” (voice).

87 Pioneer of the Minneapolis sound : PRINCE

Singer Prince was born in Minneapolis, and he lived there most of his life. Born Prince Rogers Nelson, his given name honored his father, a jazz musician who used the stage name Prince Rogers. Starting in 1993, he changed his stage name (adopting an unpronounceable symbol) and was often referred to as “The Artist Formerly Known as Prince” (TAFKAP). He died in 2016 due to an accidental fentanyl overdose at his home and recording studio located just southwest of Minneapolis. The home and studio, known as Paisley Park, is now a museum that is open to the public.

88 Poet Gorman who wrote “The Hill We Climb” : AMANDA

Amanda Gorman is a poet and activist who, in 2017, was the first person named as the National Youth Poet Laureate. Famously, Gorman recited her poem “The Hill We Climb” at the inauguration of President Biden in 2021.

When day comes, we step out of the shade aflame and unafraid. The new dawn blooms as we free it. For there is always light. If only we’re brave enough to see it. If only we’re brave enough to be it.

90 Banded rock : AGATE

Agate is a micro-crystalline form of quartz (and so is related to sand/silica). Some agate samples have deposited layers that give a striped appearance, and these are called “banded agate”.

92 Stave off : AVERT

The word “stave” was originally the plural of “staff”, a word describing a wooden rod. To “stave off” originated with the concept of holding off with a staff. In the world of barrel-making, a stave is a narrow strip of wood that forms part of a barrel’s side.

93 Quaint contraction : SHAN’T

“Shall not” is contracted to “shan’t”.

101 Big name in elevators : OTIS

Elevators (simple hoists) have been around for a long time. What Elisha Otis did was come up with the “safety elevator”, a design that he showcased at the 1853 World’s Fair in New York. At the Fair, Otis would stand on an elevated platform in front of onlookers and order his assistant to cut the single rope holding up the platform. His safety system kicked in when the platform had only fallen a few inches, amazing the crowd. After this demonstration, the orders came rolling in.

102 Manhattan address abbr. : NY, NY

The island we know as Manhattan was inhabited by the Lenape Indians when the first Europeans explorers arrived in the area. According to the logbook of one of the officers on explorer Henry Hudson’s yacht, the island was called “Manna-hata” in the local language, from which the modern name derives.

107 “Sweet Dreams (___ Made of This)” (Eurythmics hit) : ARE

Eurythmics is the name used by British pop duo Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart. The pair had previously performed together in a band called the Tourists. Eurythmics had their big break in 1983 with the release of the single “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)”, a lovely song.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Host of the 1952 Winter Olympics : OSLO
5 Not suited (for) : UNFIT
10 Beatles song with an exclamation mark in its title : HELP!
14 Wild thing : BEAST
19 Demeter’s mother, in myth : RHEA
20 Singer/songwriter Jones : NORAH
21 Abbr. on a “works cited” list : ET AL
22 Kemper of “The Office” : ELLIE
23 Direct path : BOTTOM LINE (beeline/B-line expanded)
25 Lot of land, say : ACRE
26 Director Frank : CAPRA
27 Sea plea : SOS
28 Dole (out) : METE
29 “Sheesh!” : OLDER BROTHER (oh, brother/O-brother expanded)
32 Like some cheese … or some movies : GRATED … or G-RATED
34 Toothsome : TASTY
35 “Anything you suggest is fine” : I’M EASY
36 Rathskeller decoration : STEIN
38 Anthropologist’s adjective : ETHNIC
40 Small bits of dough : ONES
41 Color of the Owl and Pussy-cat’s boat : PUTTING GREEN (pea green/P-green expanded)
44 Connecting words in logic : ANDS
45 Baby’s cry : WAH!
48 ___ Mysteries (children’s series starting with “The Absent Author”) : A TO Z
49 Champing at the bit : EAGER
50 Biologist E. O. Wilson’s focus : ANTS
51 “Alas!” : AH ME!
52 Wimple wearer : NUN
53 With 54-Across, commonly believed misconception : FALSE …
54 See 53-Across : … TRUTH
56 Panache : FLAIR
57 Go for a spin : WHIRL
59 Symbol of Middle America : PEORIA
60 Emotionally disinvest oneself : LET GO
61 ___ long-horned beetle : ASIAN
63 Something avoided during awkward situations : IN CONTACT (eye contact/I-contact expanded)
66 Firing offense? : ARSON
67 Isolated hill : BUTTE
68 They’re shared between partners, one hopes : VALUES
69 Extremely mean : NASTY
71 Theater employee : USHER
72 Into pieces : APART
73 Fictional Mr. or real Dr. : SPOCK
75 Popular flooring wood : OAK
78 “Ready for ___ …?” : THIS
79 Once more : ANEW
80 Fair part : BOOTH
81 Cocktail made with ginger beer : MULE
82 Command to a dog : SIT!
83 Gets busy : ACTS
84 Fish with a prehensile tail : CHARLEY HORSE (seahorse/C-horse expanded)
87 Symbols of wave functions : PSIS
88 One of the Furies of Greek myth : ALECTO
89 “Them’s fightin’ words!” : IT’S ON!
90 Quickly : AT A RUN
93 Suggest, with “of” : SMACK …
94 Excoriate : SCATHE
97 “Oh, that’s so nice of you to say!” : GIVING THANKS! (Gee, thanks!/G-thanks expanded)
99 Disney+ competitor : HULU
100 Fool : CON
103 Revise : AMEND
104 Chill : HANG
105 Mad Hatter’s social event : THIRD PARTY (tea party/T-party expanded)
108 9 a.m. service : TERCE
109 Command-Z, on a Mac : UNDO
110 Falcon’s home : AERIE
111 Harness part : REIN
112 Fragrant compound : ESTER
113 Space heater? : STAR
114 Back, in a way : BET ON
115 Online crafts market : ETSY

Down

1 Suns, e.g. : ORBS
2 “Scram!” : SHOO!
3 “Enough dillydallying!” : LET’S GET ON WITH IT!
4 Kind of milk : OAT
5 Like some expectations : UNMET
6 Nick of “48 Hrs.” : NOLTE
7 The yolk’s on them : FRIED EGGS
8 ___ Malcolm, Jeff Goldblum’s role in “Jurassic Park” : IAN
9 Alternative to this and that : THE OTHER
10 Enters : HEADS IN
11 “And so on and so forth” : ETC ETC
12 Big Bird? : LARRY
13 Ordinary citizen : PLEB
14 Looks good on : BECOMES
15 Overjoys : ELATES
16 A as in Agamemnon : ALPHA
17 Fathers : SIRES
18 Lachrymose : TEARY
24 Resident of a Mideast sultanate : OMANI
30 Thin thoroughfare : LANE
31 Melon parts : RINDS
33 Brand that comes in short sleeves : RITZ
36 Go across : SPAN
37 Nobelist Desmond : TUTU
39 Syntactician’s drawing : TREE
40 Transitioning phrase : ON THAT NOTE
42 Approach : NEAR
43 Flits here and there : GALLIVANTS
44 Shenanigan : ANTIC
45 Question to someone who looks impossibly young : WHAT’S YOUR SECRET?
46 Broseph : AMIGO
47 Animal aptly found in “feather one’s nest” : HERON
50 Vibe : AURA
51 Give a heads-up : ALERT
53 The ___ things in life : FINER
54 Principle : TENET
55 Doesn’t keep : ROTS
56 Chemist’s container : FLASK
58 Is really down on : HATES
59 Really come down : POUR
61 Neighbors : ABUTS
62 Food often served with gari (pickled ginger) : SUSHI
64 Backs of necks : NAPES
65 Frustrating device in an arcade : CLAW
70 Hurting : ACHY
73 Kind : SORT
74 Dressage for a horseback rider? : POLO SHIRT
76 Plus : ALSO
77 Perceptive, as an eye : KEEN
79 Getting top marks on : ACING
80 Betray : BACKSTAB
81 Wool-gatherer? : MOTH
83 Into pieces : ASUNDER
84 Cacophony : CLANGOR
85 Mild expletive : HECK!
86 Ask for money, informally : HIT UP
87 Pioneer of the Minneapolis sound : PRINCE
88 Poet Gorman who wrote “The Hill We Climb” : AMANDA
90 Banded rock : AGATE
91 Keeps a watch on? : TIMES
92 Stave off : AVERT
93 Quaint contraction : SHAN’T
95 Unusual object : CURIO
96 Last name of the Boxcar Children, in children’s literature : ALDEN
98 Consequently : THUS
101 Big name in elevators : OTIS
102 Manhattan address abbr. : NY, NY
106 Part of a giggle : -HEE
107 “Sweet Dreams (___ Made of This)” (Eurythmics hit) : ARE

13 thoughts on “0703-22 NY Times Crossword 3 Jul 22, Sunday”

  1. 18:51, nosing Bill by a second…

    I’m torn between whether this was a clever theme or a too-clever-by-half theme. I solved the whole puzzle without really figuring it out, and it wasn’t until I thought about it that I had the “aha” moment.

  2. 41:17. Everything Tom R says except the nosing out Bill part…

    Really struggled with this one. Part of the issue with the theme was logistic. I had to keep scrolling back up to the hint and alternative clues trying to figure it out. After a while, I got tired of going back and forth, ignored the “hint”, and just solved it. That actually sped me up.

    Loved the clue for GRATED/G-RATED

    Best –

  3. 56:57. I’ll second Tom R’s assessment of ‘too clever by half’. When I logged onto the app, I saw the heading “Expansion Pack”, but did not click on the info icon to see the setters notes. “If a tree falls in the forest…”.
    99A: We subscribe to HULU, and Disney+ is included in the subscription.

  4. I’m with Tom R… but by a little more than half.

    Solved none of the 7 clues, but worked hard on all the down connectors. I didn’t know it when I put it down unsolved last night, but was only one Down clue off. A jolt of caffeine this morning made the difference.

    Looking forward to the next challenge.

  5. 43:42 This would have been an order of magnitude easier if I would just read the clue/theme hint on the Sunday puzzles. Buuuuuuut…..I don’t. So I ended up inadvertently taking Jef’s approach and just bulldozing through it.

  6. 1:27:50 no errors.
    Maybe it’s just me but these puzzles seem to be getting more and more off the wall👎👎
    Stay safe😀

      1. Having done a bunch of puzzles in my life, this is one of my least favorite ever (least favorites? = I got a D in grammar). Allow me to excoriate. Clues without panache. Too many G-rated cheesy answers. Answers suggest, with “of” me in the face. O(lder) brother!

  7. Going with expansions of the real first letter would be arguably clever; going with homophones of the first letter for two of them (in contact / eye contact because “i”=eye) and (charlie horse / sea horse because “c” =sea) strikes me as a step too far, so I rate this one “rancid” (because “r”=arrgh).

    1. You’re welcome to your opinion, but … as Bill points out, each of the theme entries is created from a common phrase that is pronounced as if it consisted of a letter of the alphabet, followed by a common word; in each case, the letter is replaced by a word beginning with that letter. Seems totally consistent to me … 🤨.

      And each entry might be seen as a “Golden string” (from “G-string”, don’t you see).

      Okay, so I know that it’s a poor attempt at humor, but it’s the best that I could come up with … 😜.

  8. 29:51, 1 error. Indeed too clever by half. This is the constructor too I think, as every one with that name I’ve encountered so far have required decoder rings or elite-class ESP (either one I do not possess) to interpret.

  9. Messed up on 85D and 88A. Ha HACK instead of HECK. Didn’t know ALECTO.

    Thought the author was going to have some fun with 73A. I started to enter MCCOY but it didn’t work. You know like DR MCCOY and the real MCCOY.

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