0405-21 NY Times Crossword 5 Apr 21, Monday

Constructed by: Zhouqin Burnikel
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Take That!

Themed answers each end with something that you can TAKE:

  • 63A “So there!” … or what you can do to the ends of the answers to the starred clues? : TAKE THAT!
  • 16A *Certain psychedelic experience : ACID TRIP (giving “TAKE A TRIP”)
  • 34A *Hairstyle popularized by Lucille Ball : POODLE CUT (giving “TAKE A CUT”)
  • 44A *Cheap neighborhood bar : LOCAL DIVE (giving “TAKE A DIVE”)
  • 9D *Bunt single, e.g. : INFIELD HIT (giving “TAKE A HIT”)
  • 29D *Home of many a courthouse : COUNTY SEAT (giving “TAKE A SEAT”)

Bill’s time: 5m 37s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

4 Bourbon barrel material : OAK

Bourbon is a whiskey made here in North America, with the primary ingredient being corn. Production of the whiskey has for centuries been associated with Bourbon County in Kentucky, which gave its name to the drink.

13 ___ colada : PINA

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term that translates into “strained pineapple”. The piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

15 List for a meeting : AGENDA

“Agenda” is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

16 *Certain psychedelic experience : ACID TRIP (giving “TAKE A TRIP”)

LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist named Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

18 Nintendo game featuring balance exercises : WII FIT

Wii Fit is popular, in fact very popular. It’s the third best-selling console “game” in history, with over 20 million sold. Wii Fit uses the Wii Balance Board, on which the user stands.

23 Performs like Iggy Azalea : RAPS

“Iggy Azalea” is the stage name of Australian rapper Amethyst Kelly. I haven’t heard of her outside of crosswords …

25 Social stratum : CASTE

Although caste systems exist in several societies around the world, we tend to associate the concept with the social stratification that is still found in many parts of India. The term “caste” comes from the Portuguese word “casta” meaning “race, breed”. The Portuguese used the term to describe the hereditary social groups that they found in India when they arrived in the subcontinent in 1498.

30 Nevada city on the Truckee River : RENO

Reno, Nevada was named in honor of Major General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer killed in the Civil War. The city has a famous “Reno Arch”, a structure that stands over the main street. The arch was erected in 1926 to promote an exposition planned for the following year. After the expo, the city council decided to keep the arch and held a competition to decide what wording should be displayed, and the winner was “The Biggest Little City in the World”.

The Truckee River is the only outlet of the magnificent Lake Tahoe in the High Sierra of California/Nevada. The Truckee River flows northeast through Reno, Nevada and empties into Pyramid Lake.

31 PC monitor type, in brief : LCD

Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are the screens that are found in most laptops today, and in flat panel computer screens and some televisions. LCD monitors basically replaced Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) screens, the old television technology.

34 *Hairstyle popularized by Lucille Ball : POODLE CUT (giving “TAKE A CUT”)

The “poodle cut” hairstyle was popular in the 1950s. The style was a short cut, with the hair permed in very tight curls. One woman who famously sported the poodle cut was First Lady Mamie Eisenhower.

Lucille Ball was at the height of her success while she was married to Desi Arnaz. The couple met in 1940 and not long afterwards eloped. Lucy had several miscarriages before she gave birth to her first child in 1951, just one month before her fortieth birthday. A year and a half later, while “I Love Lucy” was garnering large audiences, she became pregnant with her second child, a pregnancy that was written into the television show’s script. In fact, the day that Lucy gave birth on the show, was the same day that she gave birth in real life.

36 Hip-hop producer who founded Aftermath Entertainment : DR DRE

“Dr. Dre” is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such as Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

38 For two, in music : A DUE

“A due” is a musical term meaning “together”, and literally translates from Italian as “by two”.

39 Jeans material : DENIM

Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase “de Nimes” (meaning “from Nimes”) gives us the word “denim”. Also, the French phrase “bleu de Genes” (meaning “blue of Genoa”) gives us our word “jeans”.

41 At the drop of ___ (instantly) : A HAT

It is suggested that the idiomatic phrase “at the drop of a hat” comes from the Old West, where a signal to start a fight was just that, a drop of a hat.

44 *Cheap neighborhood bar : LOCAL DIVE (giving “TAKE A DIVE”)

We’ve been using the word “dive” in American English for a run-down bar since the latter half of the 19th century. The term comes from the fact that disreputable taverns were usually located in basements, so one had to literally and figuratively dive into them.

46 Bygone Mach 1 breaker, for short : SST

Supersonic transports (SSTs) like the Concorde broke Mach 1, the speed of sound. As a plane flies through the air, it creates pressure waves in front (and behind) rather like the bow and stern waves of a boat. These pressure waves travel at the speed of sound, so as an aircraft itself accelerates towards the speed of sound it catches up with the pressure waves until they cannot “get out of the way”. When the aircraft reaches the speed of sound, the compressed waves merge into one single shock wave, creating a sonic boom.

The Mach number of a moving object (like say an airplane) is its speed relative to the speed of sound. A plane travelling at Mach 2, for example, is moving at twice the speed of sound. The term “Mach” takes its name from the Austrian physicist Ernst Mach who published a groundbreaking paper in 1877 that even predicted the “sonic boom”.

52 Fairy tale bear with a hard bed : PAPA

The story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” was first recorded in 1837 in England, although the narrative was around before it was actually written down. The original fairy tale was rather gruesome, but successive versions became more family-oriented. The character that eventually became Goldilocks was originally an elderly woman, and the three “nameless” bears became Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.

67 Number of Q tiles in Scrabble : ONE

The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

69 Caustic solution : LYE

What we call “lye” is usually sodium hydroxide (NaOH), although historically the term “lye” was used for potassium hydroxide. Lye has many uses, including to cure several foodstuffs. Lye can make olives less bitter, for example. The chemical is also found in canned mandarin oranges, pretzels and Japanese ramen noodles. More concentrated grades of lye are used to clear drains and clean ovens. Scary …

70 Ingredient in a Denver omelet : HAM

A Western omelet (sometimes “omelette”) is also known as a Southwest omelet or a Denver omelet. The usual ingredients include diced ham, onions and green bell peppers.

Down

1 College faculty head : DEAN

Our use of “dean” to describe an administrative officer in an educational institution dates back to the 1570s. The term comes via the Old French “deien” from the Latin “decanus”, which was the name for the head of a group of ten monks in a monastery, and earlier still, the name for the commander of ten soldiers. So ultimately, “dean” comes from the Greek “deka” meaning “ten”.

2 Whale that preys on octopuses : ORCA

The taxonomic name for the killer whale is “Orcinus orca”. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

The name “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural. Language does evolve, even though it drives me crazy …

5 Cockpit reading : AIRSPEED

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the original “cockpit” was a “pit” used for fighting “cocks”. The term was then applied nautically, as the name for the compartment below decks used as living quarters by midshipmen. The cockpit of a boat today, usually on a smaller vessel, is a sunken area towards the stern in which sits the helmsman and others (who can fit!). The usage extended to aircraft in the 1910s and to cars in the 1930s.

7 FX in much sci-fi and fantasy : CGI

Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

14 Gibbon or gorilla : APE

The tailless primates known as apes (also “hominoids”) are divided into two main branches: gibbons (lesser apes) and hominids (great apes). The hominids are the great apes, and belong to the family of primates called Hominidae. Extant genera that make up the family Hominidae are:

  • chimpanzees
  • gorillas
  • humans
  • orangutans

17 Expressed contempt for : DERIDED

To deride is to treat with contemptuous mirth. The term comes into English via Old French from the Latin “deridere” meaning “to ridicule”. In turn, “deridere” comes from the prefix “de-” (down) and “”ridere” (to laugh). So, to ridicule or deride is “to laugh down at”.

21 Like vinegar : ACETIC

Acetic acid has the formula CH3COOH, and is the main component of vinegar.

24 Falcons, on scoreboards : ATL

The Atlanta Falcons joined the NFL in 1965. The team name was suggested by a schoolteacher called Miss Julia Elliott. Elliot suggested that “the Falcon is proud and dignified, with great courage and fight. It never drops its prey. It is deadly and has a great sporting tradition.”

35 Pop singer Dion : CELINE

French-Canadian singer Céline Dion first came to international attention when she won the 1988 Eurovision Song Contest, in which she represented Switzerland in the competition that was hosted in Dublin, Ireland. She is now the best-selling Canadian artist of all time.

40 Nonsense : MALARKEY

It’s not really known how the word “malarkey” came to mean “lies and exaggeration”. What is known is that “Malarkey” is also used as a family name.

43 Home of the George W. Bush Institute, in brief : SMU

Southern Methodist University (SMU) is located in University Park, Texas (part of Dallas) and was founded in 1911. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Mustangs. Also, SMU is home to the George W. Bush Presidential Library.

48 Capitol Hill staffers : AIDES

The designer of Washington D.C., Pierre L’Enfant, chose the crest of a hill as the site for the future Congress House. He called the location “Jenkins Hill” and “Jenkins Heights”. Earlier records show the name as “New Troy”. Today we call it “Capitol Hill”.

51 Busiest airport in the Midwest : O’HARE

O’Hare International was the world’s busiest airport from 1963 to 1998. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII.

52 Oyster’s creation : PEARL

Pearls form in oysters because of a reaction that is similar to an immune system response in higher animals. The pearl is formed as the oysters lay down successive layers of calcium carbonate around some microscopic foreign body that has penetrated the shell.

54 ___ Beauty (Sephora competitor) : ULTA

Ulta Beauty is an American chain of beauty stores that was founded in 1990 and headquartered in Bolingbrook, Illinois. I am not part of the company’s target demographic …

Sephora is a French chain of cosmetic stores, founded in 1969. The name “Sephora” is derived from the Greek for “beauty” (“sephos”). We’ve been able to visit Sephora outlets in JCPenney stores since 2006.

56 Org. that monitors consumer scams : FTC

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) was established in 1914 with the mission of protecting consumers.

62 Gen ___ (millennial’s follower) : ZER

Definitions vary, but it seems that the term “Generation Z” is reserved for the children of “Generation X”, and for the generation that follows the “Millennials” (Generation Y).

64 Ovine mother : EWE

The Latin word for “sheep” is “ovis”, giving us the adjective “ovine” meaning “like a sheep”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Animal that barks : DOG
4 Bourbon barrel material : OAK
7 Tribal leader : CHIEF
12 Blunder : ERR
13 ___ colada : PINA
15 List for a meeting : AGENDA
16 *Certain psychedelic experience : ACID TRIP (giving “TAKE A TRIP”)
18 Nintendo game featuring balance exercises : WII FIT
19 ___ of the game : NAME
20 Early auto engine’s power source : STEAM
22 Construction area, e.g. : SITE
23 Performs like Iggy Azalea : RAPS
25 Social stratum : CASTE
27 Provoke : INCITE
30 Nevada city on the Truckee River : RENO
31 PC monitor type, in brief : LCD
34 *Hairstyle popularized by Lucille Ball : POODLE CUT (giving “TAKE A CUT”)
36 Hip-hop producer who founded Aftermath Entertainment : DR DRE
38 For two, in music : A DUE
39 Jeans material : DENIM
41 At the drop of ___ (instantly) : A HAT
42 Drops in the mail : SENDS
44 *Cheap neighborhood bar : LOCAL DIVE (giving “TAKE A DIVE”)
46 Bygone Mach 1 breaker, for short : SST
47 Major water line : MAIN
49 Hang around idly : LOITER
50 “Wanna join us?” : YOU IN?
52 Fairy tale bear with a hard bed : PAPA
53 Delivery room instruction : PUSH
55 Put on hold : DEFER
57 Religious sisters : NUNS
61 Real lowlife : SLEAZE
63 “So there!” … or what you can do to the ends of the answers to the starred clues? : TAKE THAT!
65 Looks without blinking : STARES
66 Ship personnel : CREW
67 Number of Q tiles in Scrabble : ONE
68 Item that may be baked or mashed, informally : TATER
69 Caustic solution : LYE
70 Ingredient in a Denver omelet : HAM

Down

1 College faculty head : DEAN
2 Whale that preys on octopuses : ORCA
3 Worrisome, as news : GRIM
4 Make a pick : OPT
5 Cockpit reading : AIRSPEED
6 Makes a scarf, say : KNITS
7 FX in much sci-fi and fantasy : CGI
8 Bank holdup : HEIST
9 *Bunt single, e.g. : INFIELD HIT (giving “TAKE A HIT”)
10 Heading in a word processing menu : EDIT
11 Destiny : FATE
14 Gibbon or gorilla : APE
15 “Geez, that sucks!” : AW, MAN!
17 Expressed contempt for : DERIDED
21 Like vinegar : ACETIC
24 Falcons, on scoreboards : ATL
26 Roll for a greenskeeper : SOD
27 “No bid from me” : I PASS
28 Connection points : NODES
29 *Home of many a courthouse : COUNTY SEAT (giving “TAKE A SEAT”)
30 Talk too long : RUN ON
32 Yearn for : CRAVE
33 Scare off : DETER
35 Pop singer Dion : CELINE
37 Visibly elated : RADIANT
40 Nonsense : MALARKEY
43 Home of the George W. Bush Institute, in brief : SMU
45 Hack (off) : LOP
48 Capitol Hill staffers : AIDES
51 Busiest airport in the Midwest : O’HARE
52 Oyster’s creation : PEARL
53 “Hey, over here!” : PSST!
54 ___ Beauty (Sephora competitor) : ULTA
56 Org. that monitors consumer scams : FTC
58 “Here comes trouble …” : UH-OH …
59 Mama’s mama : NANA
60 Part of a cherry you don’t eat : STEM
62 Gen ___ (millennial’s follower) : ZER
64 Ovine mother : EWE

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