0404-21 NY Times Crossword 4 Apr 21, Sunday

Constructed by: Angela Olson Halsted & Doug Peterson
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Game Changers

Themed answers are common phrases with an EXTRA letter inserted to give a baseball-ish phrase. Those EXTRA letters spell out the word INNINGS as we descend the grid:

  • 120A Ballgame extenders … and what can literally be found in the answers to the asterisked clues : EXTRA INNINGS
  • 23A *Perfect curveball? : IDEAL BREAKER (I in “deal breaker”)
  • 33A *Batting coach’s instruction to a lackadaisical hitter? : BUNT SERIOUSLY (N in “but, seriously”)
  • 40A *Apprentice groundskeepers? : LAWN STUDENTS (N in “law students”)
  • 65A *Overenthusiastic description of a routine base hit? : SO FAIR, SO GOOD (I in “so far, so good”)
  • 72A *Umpire’s aid in judging foul balls? : LINE DETECTOR (N in “lie detector”)
  • 99A *Long hours of fielding practice? : LABOR OF GLOVE (G in “labor of love”)
  • 104A *Imperceptible fastball movement? : INVISIBLE SINK (S in “invisible ink”)

Bill’s time: 18m 34s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Chow down on : SNARF

To snarf down is to gobble up, to eat voraciously. “Snarf” is a slang term that is probably related to “scarf”, which has the same meaning.

20 Character often found in children’s books : WALDO

The series of children’s illustrated books called “Where’s Waldo?” were originally titled “Where’s Wally?” in Britain, where the books originated. The book contains page after page of illustrations with crowds of people surrounding famous landmarks from around the world. The challenge is to find Waldo/Wally, who is hidden in the crowd.

22 Repeated cry in 1931’s “Frankenstein” : IT’S ALIVE!

The classic 1931 film “Frankenstein” is based on the Mary Shelley novel of the same name, and stars Colin Clive as Henry Frankenstein and Boris Karloff as the Monster. Bela Lugosi was offered the role of Henry Frankenstein first, and then was recast as the Monster. Lugosi tried working with the Monster role but eventually bowed out. Many say that the decision to leave was one of the worst of Lugosi’s career.

25 Ivy League city : NEW HAVEN

The city of New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1638 by Puritan immigrants from England. New Haven is home to Yale University. The city also initiated the first public tree planting program in the country. The large elms included in the program led to New Haven being called “the Elm City”.

28 White coat? : ENAMEL

Tooth enamel covers the crowns of our teeth. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. It is composed of 96% crystalline calcium phosphate.

50 New York’s Mount ___ Hospital : SINAI

Mount Sinai Hospital in New York is a large teaching hospital, one of the oldest in the country. It was opened in 1852 and originally called the Jews’ Hospital in the City of New York, with the remit of serving the city’s rapidly growing Jewish immigrant community.

51 Dark wine grape : MERLOT

Merlot is one of the main grapes used to make Bordeaux wines, along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot.

52 Part of a heartbeat : SYSTOLE

In the heart, the term “systole” describes the rhythmic contraction of the ventricles to pump the blood around the body.

68 Stand-in for Middle America : PEORIA

Peoria is the oldest European settlement in the state of Illinois, having been settled by the French in 1680. The city is famous for being cited as “the average American city”. The phrase, “Will it play in Peoria?” is used to mean, “Will it appeal to the mainstream?” It is believed the expression originated as a corruption of, “We shall play in Peoria”, a line used by some actors in the 1890 novel “Five Hundred Dollars” by Horatio Alger, Jr.

71 Pair of socks? : ONE-TWO

That would be boxing, and a one-two punch, or should it be punches?

72 *Umpire’s aid in judging foul balls? : LINE DETECTOR (N in “lie detector”)

We are most familiar with the word “polygraph” as the generic name for a lie detector instrument. This usage began in 1921, although the term had been around since the end of the 18th century. Back then, a polygraph was a mechanical device used to make multiple copies as something was written or drawn. Famously, Thomas Jefferson used a polygraph to preserve copies of letters that he wrote to correspondents.

79 Sgt. and cpl., e.g. : NCOS

A non-commissioned officer (NCO) might be a sergeant (sgt.) or a corporal (cpl.).

83 Airer of “Nancy Drew” : THE CW

The WB Television Network was launched in 1995 as a joint venture between Warner Bros. Entertainment and Tribune Broadcasting. The WB (for “Warner Bros.”) was shut down in 2006 and replaced by the CW (for “CBS” and “Warner Bros.”).

The “Nancy Drew” mystery stories were produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate. The founder of the Syndicate hired a team of writers to produce the “Nancy Drew” novels, but listed the author of each book as the fictional Carolyn Keene.

88 State where M.L.K. marched: Abbr. : ALA

The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day. The route of the march is memorialized as a US National Historic Trail called the Selma to Montgomery Voting Rights Trail.

92 King James on a court : LEBRON

Basketball player LeBron James (nicknamed “King James”) seems to be in demand for the covers of magazines. James became the first African American man to adorn the front cover of “Vogue” in March 2008. That made him only the third male to make the “Vogue” cover, following Richard Gere and George Clooney.

94 Do as Henry VI did : GO MAD

King Henry VI of England succeeded to the throne when he was just nine months old, making him the youngest monarch ever to sit on the English throne.

96 Letters on some foundations : SPF

In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

97 Jumpy sorts, in brief : ROOS

The word “kangaroo” comes from the Australian Aborigine term for the animal. There’s an oft-quoted story that the explorer James Cook (later Captain Cook) asked a local native what was the name of this remarkable-looking animal, and the native responded with “Kangaroo”. The story is that the native was actually saying “I don’t understand you”, but as cute as that tale is, it’s just an urban myth.

113 Jimmy ___ (luxury shoe brand) : CHOO

Jimmy Choo is a designer of handmade women’s shoes who was born in Malaysia but grew up and was educated in London. Choo sold the 50% stake that he had in his shoe manufacturing company in 2001, for 10 million pounds.

114 Scientist buried in Westminster Abbey : DARWIN

Englishman Charles Darwin studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland but neglected his studies largely due to his interest in nature and natural history. In the early 1830s, a friend put forward Darwin’s name as a candidate for the post of “collector” on the voyage of HMS Beagle. The Beagle was intending to spend two years at sea primarily charting the coast of South America. The voyage ended up taking five years, during which time Darwin sent back copious letters describing his findings. Back in Britain these letters were published as pamphlets by a friend and so when Darwin eventually returned home in 1836, he had already gained some celebrity in scientific circles. It was while on the Beagle that Darwin developed his initial ideas on the concept of natural selection. It wasn’t until over twenty years later that he formulated his theories into a scientific paper and in 1859 published his famous book “On the Origin of the Species”. This original publication never even mentioned the word “evolution” which was controversial even back then. It was in 1871 that Darwin addressed head-on the concept that man was an animal species, in his book “The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex”.

The actual name for the Gothic church we know as Westminster Abbey is the Collegiate Church of St. Peter at Westminster. The Abbey is a favored location for coronations and royal weddings and burials.

115 Pop artist who sings “Satisfied” on “The Hamilton Mixtape” : SIA

“Sia” is the stage name of Australian singer Sia Furler from Adelaide. Sia is a cousin of Australian Christian Rock musician Peter Furler.

116 New ___ (cap brand) : ERA

The New Era Cap Company is a headwear manufacturer based in Buffalo, New York. It is New Era that supplies all the official baseball caps used by the Major League teams.

124 Beekeeper : APIARIST

An apiary is an area where bees are kept, apiculture is beekeeping, and an apiphobe has a fear of bees. The Latin word for “bee” is “apis”.

126 Run-D.M.C. and the Jonas Brothers, for example : TRIOS

Run-DMC was a hip hop group from Queens, New York. The trio took its name from two of the group’s members: Joseph “Run” Simmons and Darryl “DMC” McDaniels.

A young neighbor of mine went to see the Jonas Brothers in concert not so long ago. She came home swooning …

129 ___ Domingo : SANTO

Santo Domingo de Guzmán (often just “Santo Domingo”) is the capital city of the Dominican Republic. Christopher Columbus was the first European to visit what is now the Dominican Republic, in 1492. Four years later Christopher’s younger brother, Bartholomew Columbus arrived, and founded Santo Domingo, making the city the oldest, continuously-inhabited European settlement in the Americas.

Down

1 Bird that can spend up to 10 months in the air without landing : SWIFT

Swifts are birds that are related to hummingbirds. Swifts are aptly named, with larger swift species clocked at airspeeds of over 100 miles/hour.

2 Absolute bottom : NADIR

The nadir is the direction pointing immediately below a particular location (through to the other side of the Earth for example). The opposite direction, that pointing immediately above, is called the zenith. We use the terms “nadir” and “zenith” figuratively to mean the low and high points in a person’s fortunes.

3 Digital assistant : ALEXA

Alexa is a personal assistant application that is most associated with Amazon Echo smart speakers. Apparently, one reason the name “Alexa” was chosen is because it might remind one of the Library of Alexandria, the “keeper of all knowledge”.

4 Food packaging abbr., once : RDA

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

8 Pampering place : SPA

The word “spa” migrated into English from Belgium, as “Spa” is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name “Spa” comes from the Walloon word “espa” meaning “spring, fountain”.

11 Gumbo pods : OKRAS

Gumbo is a type of stew or soup that originated in Louisiana. The primary ingredient can be meat or fish, but to be true gumbo it must include the “holy trinity” of vegetables, namely celery, bell peppers and onion. Okra used to be a requirement but this is no longer the case. Okra gave the dish its name as the vernacular word for the African vegetable is “okingumbo”, from the Bantu language spoken by many of the slaves brought to America.

12 Goddess with a sacred owl : MINERVA

Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom, and the equivalent of the Greek goddess Athena. Minerva is often depicted with an owl, signifying her association with wisdom.

13 Designers’ studios : ATELIERS

An atelier is an artist’s studio, with “atelier” being the French word for “studio” or “workshop”.

14 Its capital is Sydney: Abbr. : NSW

New South Wales (NSW) is the most populous state in Australia and is home to Sydney, the most populous city in the country. New South Wales was founded in 1788. When the British took over New Zealand in 1840, New Zealand was actually governed for a while as part of New South Wales.

18 Part of EGBDF : EVERY

In the world of music, EGBDF are the notes on the lines of the treble clef. The notes are often remembered with a mnemonic such as “Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge”.

29 ___ culpa : MEA

Many Roman Catholics are very familiar with the Latin phrase “mea culpa” meaning “my fault”, as it is used in the Latin Mass. The additional term “mea maxima culpa” translates as “my most grievous fault”.

32 It plays a role in arm-twisting : ULNA

The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinky-side”.

33 “Venerable” saint : BEDE

The Venerable Bede was a monk in the north of England in the eighth century AD. Saint Bede is mainly known as an author and scholar, publisher of “The Ecclesiastical History of the English People”. In his writings, Bede struggled with the two common ways of referring to dates at that time. Bede turned to the anno domini dating method that had been devised by Dionysius Exiguus in 525. Bede’s writings of circa 730 were extremely influential and helped popularize the “anno domini” method.

35 Air France hub : ORLY

Orly is a town on the outskirts of Paris, to the south of the city. It is home to the Paris-Orly Airport, the second busiest international airport for the city after the more recently built Charles de Gaulle Airport. That said, Orly is home to more domestic flights than Charles de Gaulle.

Air France is my favorite airline (okay … after Aer Lingus, the Irish airline). I used to fly Air France a lot (I lived in France for a while), but haven’t done so since the company merged with KLM in 2004. Back in 2008, Air France-KLM was the world’s largest airline in terms of revenue.

36 It brought Hope to the world : USO SHOW

The United Service Organization (USO) was founded in 1941 at the request of President Franklin D. Roosevelt “to handle the on-leave recreation of the men in the armed forces”. A USO tour is undertaken by a troupe of entertainers, many of whom are big-name celebrities. A USO tour usually includes troop locations in combat zones.

I remember my first non-business visit to Los Angeles. I was a typical tourist and bought a map showing the homes of the stars and drove around Beverly Hills absorbing all the glitz. At one point I drove past a Rolls Royce that was stopped in oncoming traffic, waiting to make a left turn. The window was down, and the driver was puffing away on a big cigar. It was none other than Bob Hope. Seeing him there right beside me; that was a big thrill …

38 When doubled, a Nabokov protagonist : HUMBERT

Vladimir Nabokov’s novel “Lolita” has a famously controversial storyline, dealing with a middle-aged man’s obsession and sexual relationship with a 12-year-old girl named Dolores Haze. 38-year-old professor Humbert Humbert privately refers to Dolores as “Lolita”. Although “Lolita” is considered a classic today, after Nabokov finished it in 1953 the edgy subject matter made it impossible for him to find a publisher in the US (where Nabokov lived). In 1955, he resorted to publishing it in English at a printing house in Paris. Publication was followed by bans and seizures all over Europe. A US printing house finally took on the project in 1958, by which time the title had such a reputation that it sold exceptionally quickly. “Lolita” became the first book since “Gone with the Wind” to sell over 100,000 copies in its first three weeks in stores.

40 Pre-bar challenge, briefly : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

41 “Je t’___” : AIME

“I love you” translates into “te amo” in Spanish, “Ich liebe dich” in German, and “je t’aime” in French.

42 Org. with Fire and Sparks : WNBA

The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) was founded in 1996. The WNBA had to compete with the American Basketball League (ABL), a professional women’s basketball league that started playing games the same year the WNBA was founded. The ABL folded in its third season.

43 It was first won by the N.Y. Mets in 1969 : NLCS

The National League Championship Series (NLCS) is a round of postseason games played by teams from Major League Baseball’s National League to determine which team will go to the World Series.

44 Snow blower brand : TORO

Toro is a manufacturer of lawn mowers and snow removal equipment that is based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was founded in 1914 to build tractor engines.

45 Word on some Oreo packages : STUF

Double Stuf Oreos were introduced in 1975, and have twice the normal amount of white cream filling as the original cookie. Nabisco really went big in 2013, introducing the Mega Stuf Oreo that has even more white cream filling.

48 Tina Turner, voicewise : ALTO

“Tina Turner” is the stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll”. Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

58 Chinese steamed bun : BAO

A baozi (also “bou, bao”) is a steamed, filled bun in Chinese cuisine.

59 Ratio of an angle’s opposite side to the hypotenuse : SINE

The hypotenuse is the longest side of a right-angled triangle, i.e. the side opposite the right angle.

62 Blueprint details : SPECS

Blueprints are reproductions of technical or architectural drawings that are contact prints made on light-sensitive sheets. Blueprints were introduced in the 1800s and the technology available dictated that the drawings were reproduced with white lines on a blue background, hence the name “blue-print”.

66 Eye cream ingredient : RETINOL

Vitamin A is actually a group of chemicals, including retinol, retinal and beta-carotene.

67 Symbol on Captain America’s shield : STAR

Captain America is a fictional superhero in comics published by Marvel Comics. He is the alter ego of a weak man called Steve Rogers who was given an experimental serum by the US Government during WWII.

69 Villainous English king in “Braveheart” : EDWARD I

Edward I of England was on the throne from 1272 to 1307 and was also known as Edward Longshanks. The “Longshanks” name came from Edward’s exceptional height.

“Braveheart” is an excellent 1995 historical drama that was directed by and stars Mel Gibson. “Braveheart” tells the story of William Wallace, the warrior who led the Scottish against King Edward I of England. Much of the movie was filmed on location in Ireland, and I visited Trim Castle not so long ago where that filming took place …

72 Former Ford models : LTDS

There has been a lot of speculation about what the abbreviation “LTD” stands for in the car model known as “Ford LTD”. Many say it is an initialism standing for “Luxury Trim Decor”, and others say that it is short for “limited”. Although the car was produced in Australia with the initialism meaning “Lincoln Type Design”, it seems that “LTD” was originally chosen as just three meaningless letters that sound well together.

73 Seller of Belgian waffles and French toast (fittingly, considering the “I” in its name) : IHOP

The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn’t do too well in marketing tests.

74 Super Soaker Soakzooka brand : NERF

Nerf is a soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

76 Ancient halls : ODEA

In ancient Greece an odeon (also “odeum”) was like a small theater, with “odeon” literally meaning “building for musical competition”. Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

77 Eldest Stark son on “Game of Thrones” : ROBB

Robb Stark is a prominent character in the George R. R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” novels, and in the TV adaption of the books “Game of Thrones”. He is portrayed by Scotticsh actor Richard Madden in the show.

80 G.I.’s garb, at times : CAMO

Our word “camouflage” (often abbreviated to “camo”) evolved directly from a Parisian slang term “camoufler” meaning “to disguise”. The term was first used in WWI, although the British navy at that time preferred the expression “dazzle-painting” as it applied to the pattern painted on the hulls of ships.

81 Speed skater Johann ___ Koss, winner of four Olympic golds : OLAV

Johann Olav Koss is a former speed skater from Norway, widely considered as one of the best speed skaters in history.

82 One-named Nigerian Grammy winner : SADE

Singer Sade’s real name is Helen Folasade Adu. Although born in Nigeria, Sade grew up and lives in the UK. She was the lead vocalist for the English group Sade, and adopted the name of the band. The band’s biggest hits were “Smooth Operator” (1984) and “The Sweetest Taboo” (1985).

90 Baseball’s Gehrig and Piniella : LOUS

Baseball legend Lou Gehrig was known as a powerhouse. He was a big hitter and just kept on playing. Gehrig broke the record for the most consecutive number of games played, and he still holds the record for the most career grand slams. His durability earned him the nickname “The Iron Horse”. Sadly, he died in 1941 at 37-years-old suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an illness we now call “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”. The New York Yankees retired the number four on 4th of July 1939 in his honor, making Lou Gehrig the first baseball player to have his number retired.

Lou Piniella is a former professional baseball player and manager. Piniella has the nickname “Sweet Lou”, which he earned for his “sweet” swing when hitting the ball as a player. The moniker is also applied somewhat tongue-in-cheek given his somewhat loud, intense and physical demeanor.

93 Russian city on the Ural River : ORSK

The city of Orsk is located about 60 miles southeast of the southern tip of the Ural Mountains in Russia. The city lies on the Ural River, which forms the boundary between Europe and Asia. As a result, Orsk can be considered situated in two continents. Orsk also lies where the Or River joins the Ural, and so the Or gives the city its name.

95 Butterlike spread : OLEO

Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. A French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something he called oleomargarine in 1869, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name “margarine”. The name “oleomargarine” also gives us our generic term “oleo”.

98 French West Indies resort island, familiarly : ST BARTS

The correct name for the island we often call “St. Barts” is “Saint Barthélemy”. St. Barts is in the Caribbean and is one of the French West Indies.

102 Camera inits. : SLR

Single-lens reflex camera (SLR)

110 Land between Togo and Nigeria : BENIN

The Republic of Benin is a country in West Africa. Benin used to be a French colony, and was known as Dahomey. Dahomey gained independence in 1975, and took the name Benin after the Bight of Benin, the body of water on which the country lies.

111 Insider’s vocabulary : ARGOT

“Argot” is a French term. It is the name given in the 17th century to “the jargon of the Paris underworld”. Nowadays argot is a set of idioms used by any particular group, the “lingo” of that group.

112 Catch with a throw : LASSO

Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

115 Wistful sound : SIGH

“Wistful” is a lovely word, I think, one that can mean “pensively sad, melancholy”.

119 Stanza contraction : ‘TIS

“Stanza” is an Italian word meaning “verse of a poem”.

121 Home of the world’s largest carnival : RIO

Rio de Janeiro is the second largest city in Brazil (after São Paulo). “Rio de Janeiro” translates as “January River”. The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Year’s Day in 1502.

The celebration of Carnival comes right before the Lenten period in some Christian traditions. It is thought that Carnival perhaps arose from the need to “eat and drink up” any excess food and drink before the beginning of Lent.

122 Word with red or army : … ANT

Fire ants are stinging ants, and many species are known as red ants. Most stinging ants bite their prey and then spray acid on the wound. The fire ant, however, bites to hold on and then injects an alkaloid venom from its abdomen, creating a burning sensation in humans who have been nipped.

Army ants are a collection of over two hundred different species of ants. Each species is known for aggressively raiding a certain area en masse, foraging for food. Army ants also stay on the move, never building permanent nests.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Chow down on : SNARF
6 “Exactly like this” : JUST SO
12 Word with mild or well : -MANNERED
20 Character often found in children’s books : WALDO
21 Emotionally process, in modern lingo : UNPACK
22 Repeated cry in 1931’s “Frankenstein” : IT’S ALIVE!
23 *Perfect curveball? : IDEAL BREAKER (I in “deal breaker”)
25 Ivy League city : NEW HAVEN
26 Jam : FIX
27 Crucial : KEY
28 White coat? : ENAMEL
30 Course standards : PARS
31 Emergency room concern : TRAUMA
33 *Batting coach’s instruction to a lackadaisical hitter? : BUNT SERIOUSLY (N in “but, seriously”)
37 Habitual drinkers : LUSHES
39 Opposed (to) : AVERSE
40 *Apprentice groundskeepers? : LAWN STUDENTS (N in “law students”)
46 Singer/songwriter Parks with the 2021 album “Collapsed in Sunbeams” : ARLO
47 It might get pulled in both directions : SAW
50 New York’s Mount ___ Hospital : SINAI
51 Dark wine grape : MERLOT
52 Part of a heartbeat : SYSTOLE
54 Diplomatic official: Abbr. : AMB
55 Corn core : COB
57 Cancels : SCRUBS
60 Alacrity : HASTE
61 Afternoon socials : TEAS
63 Where dreams are made : BED
65 *Overenthusiastic description of a routine base hit? : SO FAIR, SO GOOD (I in “so far, so good”)
68 Stand-in for Middle America : PEORIA
71 Pair of socks? : ONE-TWO
72 *Umpire’s aid in judging foul balls? : LINE DETECTOR (N in “lie detector”)
78 GPS approximation : ETA
79 Sgt. and cpl., e.g. : NCOS
83 Airer of “Nancy Drew” : THE CW
84 Old salt : SEA DOG
86 Fury : IRE
88 State where M.L.K. marched: Abbr. : ALA
89 Some fins : DORSALS
92 King James on a court : LEBRON
94 Do as Henry VI did : GO MAD
96 Letters on some foundations : SPF
97 Jumpy sorts, in brief : ROOS
99 *Long hours of fielding practice? : LABOR OF GLOVE (G in “labor of love”)
101 ___ only : ADULTS
103 Tilting : ASLOPE
104 *Imperceptible fastball movement? : INVISIBLE SINK (S in “invisible ink”)
109 All over the place : GLOBAL
113 Jimmy ___ (luxury shoe brand) : CHOO
114 Scientist buried in Westminster Abbey : DARWIN
115 Pop artist who sings “Satisfied” on “The Hamilton Mixtape” : SIA
116 New ___ (cap brand) : ERA
117 Trouble, metaphorically : HOT WATER
120 Ballgame extenders … and what can literally be found in the answers to the asterisked clues : EXTRA INNINGS
124 Beekeeper : APIARIST
125 ___ to go : RARING
126 Run-D.M.C. and the Jonas Brothers, for example : TRIOS
127 Bands’ performance sheets : SET LISTS
128 Unruffled : SMOOTH
129 ___ Domingo : SANTO

Down

1 Bird that can spend up to 10 months in the air without landing : SWIFT
2 Absolute bottom : NADIR
3 Digital assistant : ALEXA
4 Food packaging abbr., once : RDA
5 What’s heard at many a coffeehouse : FOLK MUSIC
6 Group sometimes said to be “out” : JURY
7 French article : UNE
8 Pampering place : SPA
9 In use : TAKEN
10 Candle choice : SCENT
11 Gumbo pods : OKRAS
12 Goddess with a sacred owl : MINERVA
13 Designers’ studios : ATELIERS
14 Its capital is Sydney: Abbr. : NSW
15 “Uh-uh” : NAH
16 Go by : ELAPSE
17 Compete with : RIVAL
18 Part of EGBDF : EVERY
19 Places to play cards, often : DENS
24 The Daily ___ (online news site) : BEAST
29 ___ culpa : MEA
32 It plays a role in arm-twisting : ULNA
33 “Venerable” saint : BEDE
34 Manual readers : USERS
35 Air France hub : ORLY
36 It brought Hope to the world : USO SHOW
38 When doubled, a Nabokov protagonist : HUMBERT
40 Pre-bar challenge, briefly : LSAT
41 “Je t’___” : AIME
42 Org. with Fire and Sparks : WNBA
43 It was first won by the N.Y. Mets in 1969 : NLCS
44 Snow blower brand : TORO
45 Word on some Oreo packages : STUF
47 Nothing special : SO-SO
48 Tina Turner, voicewise : ALTO
49 Goldenrod, e.g. : WEED
53 Append : TAG ON
56 Instrument with a flared end : OBOE
58 Chinese steamed bun : BAO
59 Ratio of an angle’s opposite side to the hypotenuse : SINE
62 Blueprint details : SPECS
64 Runs out of juice : DIES
66 Eye cream ingredient : RETINOL
67 Symbol on Captain America’s shield : STAR
69 Villainous English king in “Braveheart” : EDWARD I
70 Outstanding pitcher : ACE
72 Former Ford models : LTDS
73 Seller of Belgian waffles and French toast (fittingly, considering the “I” in its name) : IHOP
74 Super Soaker Soakzooka brand : NERF
75 Like some orders : TALL
76 Ancient halls : ODEA
77 Eldest Stark son on “Game of Thrones” : ROBB
80 G.I.’s garb, at times : CAMO
81 Speed skater Johann ___ Koss, winner of four Olympic golds : OLAV
82 One-named Nigerian Grammy winner : SADE
85 Pained sound : GROAN
87 In the Renaissance, they were known as “mala insana” (“mad apples”) : EGGPLANTS
90 Baseball’s Gehrig and Piniella : LOUS
91 Most reliable : SOLIDEST
93 Russian city on the Ural River : ORSK
95 Butterlike spread : OLEO
98 French West Indies resort island, familiarly : ST BARTS
100 Keep from flying, maybe : FOG IN
101 Profession : AVOWAL
102 Camera inits. : SLR
104 “With any luck …” : I HOPE …
105 Tag line? : NOT IT!
106 Fancy pourers : EWERS
107 Paper route hour, maybe : SIX AM
108 Headliner’s cue : INTRO
110 Land between Togo and Nigeria : BENIN
111 Insider’s vocabulary : ARGOT
112 Catch with a throw : LASSO
113 Alternative to Chuck : CHAS
115 Wistful sound : SIGH
118 Man’s name that’s 123-Down reversed : ARI
119 Stanza contraction : ‘TIS
121 Home of the world’s largest carnival : RIO
122 Word with red or army : … ANT
123 Man’s name that’s 118-Down reversed : IRA

9 thoughts on “0404-21 NY Times Crossword 4 Apr 21, Sunday”

  1. 15:43. A little slowish at the bottom but a basically smooth solve. I liked the INNINGS progression in the theme. Topical, with opening day this week.

  2. 36:09. Nothing particularly easy or hard about this one. I had very few answers filled in after the first pass. Just had to keep plugging with this one.

    I think I was still affected by my evil next door neighbor while solving. When I bought this house 3 years ago, the owner warned me about this person. I thought he was exaggerating. He wasn’t. A mature person would just take the high road, but that has nothing to do with me. I’m still thinking of childish pranks for revenge. I’m sure I’ll come up with something.

    Best –

  3. 30:49. This seemed like a struggle – e.g. I grew up in New Haven (25A) and I had to get several crosses to fill it in. Should have been a no-brainer. I was scattershot over the whole grid and made lots of errors – SPEED vs. HASTE, NEWTON vs DARWIN, etc.

    Happy Easter!

  4. 57:23 had a hard time figuring out the themed answers…never saw “innings” until coming here…no surprise there!
    🙂

  5. 1:07:20 no errors…the theme actually helped on this one.👍
    When I was a kid I thought the line in America The Beautiful was “my country ‘tis a “V” because of the shape of Texas forming a “V”…not to worry, by the time I was married with children I got it right.
    Stay safe😀

  6. No errors.. but I was stuck on 45D for way too long. I thought the clue was “WORD ON SOME ORCO PACKAGES”. the printed version is so small that it turned out to be OREO… had to wait for crosses to fill and wondered what STUF there was on ORCO packages.. oh, … OREO!!!!!

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