0308-21 NY Times Crossword 8 Mar 21, Monday

Constructed by: Eric Bornstein
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Economics

Today’s grid resembles a graph from ECONOMICS. Horizontally, along the bottom of the grid (X-AXIS) we have QUANTITY. Vertically, along the left of the grid (Y-AXIS) we have PRICE. Circled letters represent the DEMAND and SUPPLY curves, showing the impact of changing PRICE and QUANTITY:

  • 13D Subject of this puzzle : ECONOMICS
  • 32D “Father” of 13-Down : ADAM SMITH
  • 62A X-axis : QUANTITY
  • 1D Y-axis : PRICE

Bill’s time: 6m 45s

Bill’s errors: 2!

  • SMAUG (Smaag)
  • JUKES (jakes)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

16 Percussion item that’s shaken : MARACA

Maracas are percussion instruments that are native to Latin America. They are constructed from dried shells, like those of a coconut, to which handles are attached. The shells are filled with dried seeds or beans, and played by shaking.

20 Biblical twin of Jacob : ESAU

Esau was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described with “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother Jacob, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

24 “___ Beso” (1962 Paul Anka hit) : ESO

“Eso Beso” is Spanish for “That Kiss”, and is the title of a 1962 hit song recorded by Canadian-born singer Paul Anka.

27 Sandwich often served with mayo : BLT

The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second-most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

Mayonnaise originated in the town of Mahon in Menorca, a Mediterranean island belonging to Spain. The Spanish called the sauce “salsa mahonesa” after the town, and this morphed into the French word “mayonnaise” that we use in English today.

29 “I’m shocked!,” in a text : OMG!

“OMG” is text-speak for “Oh My Gosh!” “Oh My Goodness!” or any other G-words you might care to use …

31 Religion based in Haifa, Israel : BAHA’I

The Baha’i Faith is relatively new in the scheme of things, and was founded in Persia in the 1800s. One of the tenets of the religion is that messengers have come from God over time, including Abraham, the Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, and most recently Bahá’u’lláh who founded the Baha’i Faith. Baha’i scripture specifies some particular architectural requirements for houses of worship, including that the building have nine-sided, circular shape. It is also specified that there be no pictures, statues or images displayed within a temple.

Haifa is the third-largest city in Israel and the largest city in the north of the country. Haifa is built on the slopes of Mount Carmel, and is a Mediterranean seaport.

37 NPR host Shapiro : ARI

Ari Shapiro served very ably as White House correspondent for National Public Radio (NPR) for several years. He then became a co-host of network’s drive-time program “All Things Considered” in 2015. When he’s not working, Shapiro likes to sing. He regularly appears as a guest singer with the group Pink Martini, and has appeared on several of the band’s albums.

38 Big name in transmission repair : AAMCO

AAMCO is named after one of the two founders, Anthony A. Martino (AAM). The company was founded in 1963 in Philadelphia, and opened its first franchise in Newark that same year. There are now about 800 franchises, and AAMCO is the largest chain in the world specializing in automotive transmissions.

40 U.S. sports org. with many prominent Korean champions : LPGA

The Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) was founded in 1950 by a group of 13 lady golfers, and today it is the oldest ongoing women’s sports professional organization in the US.

42 The Monkees’ “___ Believer” : I’M A

“I’m a Believer” was a big hit for the Monkees in 1966. The band’s recording of “I’m a Believer” is a cover version. The song was written and originally recorded by Neil Diamond.

The Monkees pop group was assembled in 1966 specifically for a planned television series called “The Monkees”. The show aired from 1966 to 1968, and the band continued to perform in concerts until 1970. 20 years after the band was formed, there was a revival in interest for both the show and the band’s music, so the Monkees got together for several reunion tours. The lead singer of the group was Englishman Davy Jones, who passed away in February 2012.

44 Org. in “Zero Dark Thirty” : CIA

“Zero Dark Thirty” is a film directed by Kathryn Bigelow that tells of the long but ultimately successful hunt for Osama bin Laden. I found one aspect of this film to be particularly uplifting, namely the central role played by a remarkable CIA officer who was a woman operating against the odds in a man’s world.

45 Noted children’s research hospital : ST JUDE

The St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is located in Memphis, Tennessee. The hospital was founded in 1962 by entertainer Danny Thomas, and is named after Thomas’ patron saint.

47 Actor Philip with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : AHN

Actor Philip Ahn is perhaps best known for playing Master Kahn, one of Caine’s teachers on the television show “Kung Fu”. Ahn was the first Asian-American actor to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Hollywood Walk of Fame is a series of sidewalks taking up 15 blocks of Hollywood Boulevard and 3 blocks of Vine Street in Hollywood. The Walk of Fame is an ever-changing monument dedicated to those who have achieved greatness in the entertainment industry, both in front of and behind the camera. The first stars installed in the sidewalk were a group of eight, officially laid in 1960. That group consisted of:

  • Joanne Woodward (actor)
  • Olive Borden (actor)
  • Ronald Colman (actor)
  • Louise Fazenda (actor)
  • Preston Foster (actor)
  • Burt Lancaster (actor)
  • Edward Sedgwick (director)
  • Ernest Torrence (actor)

48 Uncle ___ (patriotic figure) : SAM

The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the code word “Samland” for “America” in intelligence communiques.

51 Dragon in “The Hobbit” : SMAUG

The dragon named Smaug is the principal antagonist in J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit”.

52 Legendary queen and founder of Carthage : DIDO

Dido was the founder of Carthage, and the city’s first queen. Some sources use the name “Elissa” for the same person.

55 Tasket’s partner in a nursery rhyme : TISKET

“A-Tisket, A-Tasket” was a hit for Ella Fitzgerald. The song is quite unusual in that the lyrics are taken from a nursery rhyme. In 1938, Ella Fitzgerald and Al Feldman took the words of the rhyme, extended them and created what is now a jazz standard.

57 Hazards for offshore swimmers : RIPTIDES

Riptides are stretches of turbulent water caused by the meeting of different currents in the ocean.

60 Faucet attachments : AERATORS

A faucet aerator is a device screwed onto the tip of a faucet to deliver a mixture of air and water. The main purpose of faucet aerators, in these days of dwindling water supplies, is to increase the perceived water pressure.

61 Writings of Ph.D. candidates : THESES

“Ph.D.” is an abbreviation for “philosophiae doctor”, Latin for “teacher of philosophy”. Often, candidates for a PhD already hold a bachelor’s and a master’s degree, so a PhD might be considered a “third degree”.

Down

2 Moon-related : LUNAR

“Luna” is the Latin word for “moon”, and is the name given to the Roman moon goddess. The Greek equivalent of Luna was Selene. Luna had a temple on the Aventine Hill in Rome but it was destroyed during the Great Fire that raged during the reign of Nero.

3 Tennis’s Agassi : ANDRE

Retired tennis professional Andre Agassi has been married to fellow player Steffi Graf since 2001. Agassi wrote an autobiography called “Open”, published in 2009. An amazing revelation in the book is that Agassi’s famous head of hair was actually a wig for much of his playing career. Can you imagine how hard it must have been to play tennis at his level with a rug stuck on?

5 Greek M’s : MUS

The Greek letter mu is the forerunner to our Roman letter M.

7 Middle part of the body : TORSO

“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

8 One-named Irish singer : ENYA

Enya’s real name is Eithne Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career, eventually becoming Ireland’s best-selling solo musician. And, she sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

9 Bit of concert equipment : AMP

An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

11 One of over 200 recognized by the American Kennel Club : BREED

The American Kennel Club (AKC) is the organization that handles registration of purebred dogs The AKC also promotes dog shows around the country, including the famous Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

21 Golden state? : UTOPIA

The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in his book “Utopia” published in 1516 to describe an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek “ou” meaning “not” and “topos” meaning “place”. By calling his perfect island “Not Place”, More was apparently making the point that he didn’t think that the ideal could actually exist.

24 “Night” memoirist Wiesel : ELIE

Elie Wiesel was a holocaust survivor, and is best known for his book “Night” that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. He was also the first recipient of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum Award, which was later renamed the Elie Wiesel Award in his honor.

26 Cheer at a bullfight : OLE!

Spanish bullfighting is known locally as “corrida de toros”, literally “race of bulls”.

28 “___ and Bess” : PORGY

“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and his wife Dorothy. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is probably the wonderful aria “Summertime”.

30 Classic Pontiac sports cars : GTOS

The Pontiac GTO was produced by GM from 1964 to 1974, and again by a GM subsidiary in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original GTO’s design is credited to Pontiac chief engineer at the time John DeLorean, who later founded the DeLorean Motor Company.

31 Much-visited Indonesian isle : BALI

Bali is both an island and a province in Indonesia. It is a popular tourist spot, although the number of visitors dropped for a few years as a result of terrorist bombings in 2002 and 2005 that killed mainly tourists. Bali became more popular starting in 2008 due to a significant and favorable change in the exchange rate between the US dollar and the Indonesian rupiah.

32 “Father” of 13-Down : ADAM SMITH
(13D Subject of this puzzle : ECONOMICS)

Adam Smith was a pioneer in the field of “political economy”, an original term used for the study of production and trade and their relationship with law, government and the distribution of wealth. Adam Smith’s great work is called “The Wealth of Nations” that was published in 1776. The book was a big hit within his own lifetime and went a long way to earning him the reputation as the father of modern economics and capitalism. Smith coined the phrase “the invisible hand of the market”, describing his assertion that a marketplace tends to self-regulate.

34 Drew for an atlas : MAPPED

The famous Flemish geographer Gerardus Mercator published his first collection of maps in 1578. Mercator’s collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders. That image gave us our term “atlas” that is used for a book of maps.

35 Singer Bareilles : SARA

Sara Bareilles achieved success with her 2007 “Love Song” with the help of the iTunes online store. In one week in June of that year, iTunes offered the song as “free single of the week” and it quickly became the most downloaded song in the store, and from there climbed to the number spot in the charts.

38 Tennis score after deuce : AD IN

In tennis, if the score reaches deuce (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the advantage. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. The player calling out the score announces “ad in”, or more formally “advantage in”, if he/she has the advantage. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

The exact origins of the scoring system used for a game in tennis seems to be a tad murky. One suggestion is that clock faces were once used to keep score, with a hand pointing to 15, 30, 45 and 60. When the rules were changed to ensure games were won with more than a one-point difference in the score, the concept of “deuce” was introduced. The hand on the clock was then moved back to 40 (for deuce), and 50 was used for “advantage”, with 60 continuing to represent “game”. This resulted in the scores 15, 30, 40 and game.

40 ’60s hallucinogenic : LSD

LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist named Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

43 Playwright O’Neill : EUGENE

Playwright Eugene O’Neill was born in a New York City hotel room in what is now called Times Square, in 1888. That building no longer exists and there is a Starbucks on the site today, but you can go take a look at the commemorative plaque at the Northeast corner of 43rd and Broadway. O’Neill died in 1953, in room 401 of the Sheraton Hotel on Bay State Road in Boston. His last words were, “I knew it. I knew it. Born in a hotel room, and God damn it, died in a hotel room.” Eugene O’Neill won a Pulitzer for his play “Anna Christie”.

46 Fakes out of position, as in football : JUKES

To juke is to duck or dodge. The term “juke” evolved into the early 1970s as a variant of “jook”. “Jook” is a Scottish term with the same meaning that dates back to the 1500s.

47 Farewell : ADIEU

“Adieu” is French for “goodbye, farewell”, from “à Dieu” meaning “to God”. The plural of “adieu” is “adieux”.

51 “A.S.A.P.!” : STAT!

The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turn-around time”.

53 Baghdad’s land : IRAQ

According to the University of Baghdad, the name “Baghdad” dates way back, to the 18th-century BCE (yes, BCE!). The name can be translated into English from the language of ancient Babylon as “old garden” (bagh-) and “beloved” (-dad).

56 Football scores, for short : TDS

Touchdown (TD)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Schoolyard friend : PLAYMATE
9 Strolled : AMBLED
15 Abandon : RUN OUT ON
16 Percussion item that’s shaken : MARACA
17 Manufacturing of factory goods, e.g. : INDUSTRY
18 Victimize : PREY ON
19 Ace of spades or queen of hearts : CARD
20 Biblical twin of Jacob : ESAU
22 Existence : BEING
23 Before, poetically : ERE
24 “___ Beso” (1962 Paul Anka hit) : ESO
25 Shared with, as a story : TOLD TO
27 Sandwich often served with mayo : BLT
28 Connector between levels of a fire station : POLE
29 “I’m shocked!,” in a text : OMG!
31 Religion based in Haifa, Israel : BAHA’I
34 Sulk : MOPE
35 Bothered state : SNIT
36 “What goes up must come down,” e.g. : ADAGE
37 NPR host Shapiro : ARI
38 Big name in transmission repair : AAMCO
39 Young lady : LASS
40 U.S. sports org. with many prominent Korean champions : LPGA
41 Gown : DRESS
42 The Monkees’ “___ Believer” : I’M A
43 Catch sight of : ESPY
44 Org. in “Zero Dark Thirty” : CIA
45 Noted children’s research hospital : ST JUDE
47 Actor Philip with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : AHN
48 Uncle ___ (patriotic figure) : SAM
51 Dragon in “The Hobbit” : SMAUG
52 Legendary queen and founder of Carthage : DIDO
54 Change domiciles : MOVE
55 Tasket’s partner in a nursery rhyme : TISKET
57 Hazards for offshore swimmers : RIPTIDES
59 Go to : ATTEND
60 Faucet attachments : AERATORS
61 Writings of Ph.D. candidates : THESES
62 X-axis : QUANTITY

Down

1 Y-axis : PRICE
2 Moon-related : LUNAR
3 Tennis’s Agassi : ANDRE
4 “___ be surprised” : YOU’D
5 Greek M’s : MUS
6 Swear (to) : ATTEST
7 Middle part of the body : TORSO
8 One-named Irish singer : ENYA
9 Bit of concert equipment : AMP
10 Stone for a statue : MARBLE
11 One of over 200 recognized by the American Kennel Club : BREED
12 “I’m listening” : LAY IT ON ME
13 Subject of this puzzle : ECONOMICS
14 “Nuts!” : DANG!
21 Golden state? : UTOPIA
24 “Night” memoirist Wiesel : ELIE
26 Cheer at a bullfight : OLE!
27 Sacks : BAGS
28 “___ and Bess” : PORGY
30 Classic Pontiac sports cars : GTOS
31 Much-visited Indonesian isle : BALI
32 “Father” of 13-Down : ADAM SMITH
33 Tries some food : HAS A TASTE
34 Drew for an atlas : MAPPED
35 Singer Bareilles : SARA
38 Tennis score after deuce : AD IN
40 ’60s hallucinogenic : LSD
43 Playwright O’Neill : EUGENE
44 Actress Priyanka who was 2000’s Miss World : CHOPRA
46 Fakes out of position, as in football : JUKES
47 Farewell : ADIEU
48 “Me too” : SO DO I
49 Prevent, as disaster : AVERT
50 Complicated, as a divorce : MESSY
51 “A.S.A.P.!” : STAT!
53 Baghdad’s land : IRAQ
54 Baseball glove : MITT
56 Football scores, for short : TDS
58 Lie in the sun : TAN

4 thoughts on “0308-21 NY Times Crossword 8 Mar 21, Monday”

  1. 8:20. Struggled a bit with this one. The crossing of 44D with 47A hung me up for a while and I also had several fat fingers to find.

  2. 5:14. Clever theme for a Monday. I got hung up a little in the NW corner where I started, because I was looking for a synonym for y-axis, and thinking I was stupid for being bogged down on a Monday. Then I filled PRICE from the crosses and realized something else was going on, and the rest proceeded smoothly.

  3. 7:52, no errors. Did it in a mental fog, I guess. At the end, I said to myself, “PRICE. QUANTITY. Hmph. Is that all?” And then, belatedly, I noticed the little circles … 😜.

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