0306-21 NY Times Crossword 6 Mar 21, Saturday

Constructed by: Sid Sivakumar
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 15m 34s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Author of “The Witches” and “The Twits” : DAHL

Roald Dahl’s name is Norwegian. Dahl’s parents were from Norway, although Dahl himself was Welsh. Dahl became one of the most successful authors of the twentieth century. Two of his most famous titles are “James and the Giant Peach” and “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”.

9 Energy sources, of a sort : CARBS

Only relatively small amounts of carbohydrate can be stored by the human body, but those stores are important. The actual storage molecule is a starch-like polysaccharide called glycogen, which is found mainly in the liver and muscles. Glycogen is a quick source of energy when required by the body. Most of the body’s energy is stored in the form of fat, a more compact substance that is mobilized less rapidly. Endurance athletes often eat meals high in carbohydrates (carbo-loading) a few hours before an event, so that their body’s glycogen is at optimum levels.

18 Event whose organizers are concerned with brand recognition? : RODEO

“Rodeo” is a Spanish word that is usually translated into English as “round up”.

20 “Live” co-host beginning in 2001 : RIPA

When Kelly Ripa secured the co-host spot on morning television with Regis Philbin, she was still acting in “All My Children” in a role she had been playing for over ten years. After a year of holding down two jobs, she eventually gave up the acting gig. Ripa has acted as spokeswoman for several brands over the years, including Electrolux and Rykä.

25 Steals, slangily : GLOMS

“Glom” is a slang term meaning “steal”, although it can also be used to mean “latch onto” when used as “glom onto”. The term probably comes from the Scots word “glam” meaning “to snatch at”.

29 Symbol of San Francisco : CABLE CAR

The Cable Car Museum in San Francisco is a little special in that it is housed in the same complex as the city’s cable car power house. While touring the museum, visitors can look out over the power house and see the huge haulage cables heading out to the streets to pull the cars up all of those steep hills.

37 British pop star who sang 2012’s “R.I.P.” : RITA ORA

Rita Ora is a British singer who was born Rita Sahatçiu in Pristina, Yugoslavia to Albanian parents. The family name “Sahatçiu” comes from a Turkish word meaning “watchmaker”. Rita’s parents changed their name to make it easier to pronounce. So, the family name morphed from “watchmaker” to “time”, which is “ora” in Albanian.

38 A.F.C. South squad : THE COLTS

The Indianapolis Colts professional football team has been in Indiana since 1984. The team traces its roots back to the Dayton Triangles, one of the founding members of the NFL created in 1913. The Dayton Triangles relocated and became the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1930, and then the Brooklyn Tigers in 1944. The team merged with the Boston Yanks in 1945, and then played in Boston. The Yanks were moved to New York in 1949, and then to Dallas in 1952 as the Dallas Texans. The Texan franchise moved to Baltimore in 1953, forming the Colts. The Colts made their last move in 1984, to Indianapolis. Whew!

48 Faces of the internet? : EMOJIS

An emoji is a character found on many cell phones that is much like an emoticon, but is more elaborate.

49 Organic fuel : PEAT

When dead plant matter accumulates in marshy areas, it may not fully decay due to a lack of oxygen or acidic conditions. We are familiar with this in Ireland, because this decaying matter can form peat, and we have lots and lots of peat bogs around the country.

59 What “M” and “F” are both short for : DAYS

The sequence MTWTF (Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri) might appear on a calendar (cal.).

60 Harper of “No Country for Old Men” : TESS

American novelist Cormac McCarthy published the novel “No Country for Old Men” in 2005, and saw it adapted into a very successful film of the same name released in 2007. The title comes from the opening line of the William Butler Yeats poem “Sailing to Byzantium”, a poem that we Irish school kids all had to read and learn to recite …

Down

1 “Star Trek” character played by 12-Down : DATA
(12D Actor Spiner : BRENT)

Actor Brent Spiner plays the android named Lieutenant Commander Data on television’s “Star Trek: The Next Generation”. Spiner also played the eccentric Dr. Brackish Okun in the 1996 movie “Independence Day”.

6 A.D.A.-compliant, in a way : RAMPED

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)

9 First supermodel to produce her own posters and calendars : CAROL ALT

Carol Alt is a model from Queens, New York. Alt’s big break came when she was featured on the cover of the 1982 “Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue”.

10 Page-previewing program : ADOBE READER

Adobe Acrobat is the software used to create .pdf files. Most of us are more familiar with the associated application called Adobe Reader, because that’s what we use to read those .pdf files.

11 “The Age of Bronze” artist : RODIN

Auguste Rodin was a French sculptor who was known for realistic representations of the human form. Two of Rodin’s most famous works started out as details from a larger work called “The Gates of Hell”. One of these details is “The Thinker”, and the other “The Kiss”.

13 Busses near Paddington Station? : SNOGS

“Snogging” is British slang of unknown origin that dates back to the end of WWII. The term is used for “kissing and cuddling”, what we call “making out” over here in the US.

To buss is to kiss.

London Paddington is a major railway station in the British capital. Among the station’s claim to fame is that it is the terminus for the express trains from Heathrow airport. Also, the title character in the “Paddington Bear” stories was named for the station, as he was found there by the Brown family.

15 Certain school clique : NERDS

A clique is a small, exclusive group of people. The term “clique” comes to us from France, where it has the same meaning. In French, it somehow evolved in meaning from the original “clique” meaning a sharp noise, or as we would say today, “click”.

24 Bolshevik’s foe : TSAR

The last ruler of Imperial Russia was Tsar Nicholas II (of the House of Romanov). Famously, the Tsar and his family were murdered in 1918 in the basement of a house in Yekaterinburg, Russia by members of the Bolshevik secret police. The Tsar’s youngest daughter was 16-year-old Anastasia and rumors of her escape have persisted for years. The rumors grew with the help of numerous women who claimed to be Anastasia. In 2009, DNA testing finally proved that the remains of all of the Tsar’s immediate family, including Anastasia, have been found and identified.

At the second party congress of the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party in 1903, a split developed. The faction with the most support was led by Vladimir Lenin. As they were in the majority, the group became known as the Bolsheviks, a term derived from the Russian word for “more” or “majority”. Lenin and the Bolsheviks led the October Revolution of 1917, as a result of which Lenin came to power. He headed the new Soviet State during its formative years.

25 Main ingredient in the curry dish kosha mangsho : GOAT

Curry powder is a mixture of spices used in South Asian dishes. The actual composition of curry powder varies depending on the cuisine. The term “curry” is an anglicization of the Tamil “kari” meaning “sauce”.

34 Shticks : ROUTINES

A shtick is a routine, a bit, a piece of entertainment. It comes from the Yiddish “shtick”, which has the same meaning and derives from the Middle High German word “stücke”, the word for “piece”.

35 “___ World” (“Sesame Street” segment) : ELMO’S

The last 15 minutes of the children’s show “Sesame Street” was called “Elmo’s World”. The ending segment was directed towards younger viewers, those around 3 years old.

39 Stir-fry ingredient : SNAP PEA

Sugar peas are also known as snap peas. These peas are eaten before the seeds mature, and the whole pod is consumed.

43 Used as a rendezvous point : MET AT

A rendezvous is a meeting. The noun used in English comes from the French phrase “rendez vous” meaning “present yourselves”.

44 Insignificant : PETTY

The word “petty”, meaning “small-minded”, comes from the French word for small, “petit”. When “petty” first came into English it wasn’t used disparagingly, and was used more literally giving us terms like “petty officer” and “petty cash”. The word “petty” evolved into a prefix “petti-” with the meaning of “small”, as in the word “petticoat”.

45 Birthplace of Malcolm X : OMAHA

Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little in Omaha, Nebraska in 1925. He told his own life story in the incredibly successful book “The Autobiography of Malcolm X”, on which he collaborated with author Alex Haley. Malcolm Little changed his name when he joined the Nation of Islam, choosing “X” to represent the African family name that he could never know.

46 Unit of cryptocurrency : TOKEN

A cryptocurrency is a digital asset that I simply do not understand. Apparently, an essential aspect of cryptocurrency is that it has no central administration. The first, and most famous, decentralized cryptocurrency is bitcoin.

47 Adjusts to zero, in a way : TARES

Tare is the weight of a container that is deducted from the gross weight to determine the net weight, the weight of the container’s contents.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Author of “The Witches” and “The Twits” : DAHL
5 One might be raised by a skeptic : BROW
9 Energy sources, of a sort : CARBS
14 Side opposite 41-Across in a sci-fi clash : ALIEN RACE
16 Bedizen : ADORN
17 Worked on together : TAG-TEAMED
18 Event whose organizers are concerned with brand recognition? : RODEO
19 Grate stuff : ASH
20 “Live” co-host beginning in 2001 : RIPA
21 Pre-commencement activity : ROBING
22 Skills that not many people know about : HIDDEN TALENTS
25 Steals, slangily : GLOMS
27 Keep off the court? : DISBAR
28 Sticks in water : OARS
29 Symbol of San Francisco : CABLE CAR
33 Promises : ASSURES
37 British pop star who sang 2012’s “R.I.P.” : RITA ORA
38 A.F.C. South squad : THE COLTS
40 Leak proof? : DRIP
41 See 14-Across : HUMANS
43 Patches, say : MENDS
44 School science project involving a vegetable and a voltmeter : POTATO BATTERY
48 Faces of the internet? : EMOJIS
49 Organic fuel : PEAT
50 Barb : JAB
53 In a relationship : TAKEN
54 Aria, e.g. : OPERA SOLO
56 “Done!” : THERE!
57 What takes all types? : DELETE KEY
58 Removes from the mound, in baseball lingo : YANKS
59 What “M” and “F” are both short for : DAYS
60 Harper of “No Country for Old Men” : TESS

Down

1 “Star Trek” character played by 12-Down : DATA
2 “That’s the way the cookie crumbles” : ALAS
3 Place for the self-righteous, metaphorically : HIGH HORSE
4 ___ slip : LET
5 Traditional feature of a Hindu bride : BRAID
6 A.D.A.-compliant, in a way : RAMPED
7 Expansive : OCEANIC
8 Bond : WED
9 First supermodel to produce her own posters and calendars : CAROL ALT
10 Page-previewing program : ADOBE READER
11 “The Age of Bronze” artist : RODIN
12 Actor Spiner : BRENT
13 Busses near Paddington Station? : SNOGS
15 Certain school clique : NERDS
21 Literally, “my master” : RABBI
23 “So sorry, that was totally the wrong thing to say!” : I’M SUCH A JERK
24 Bolshevik’s foe : TSAR
25 Main ingredient in the curry dish kosha mangsho : GOAT
26 Curling target : LASH
30 Groaner : CORNY JOKE
31 Like most of Mars : ARID
32 Freestyles, perhaps : RAPS
34 Shticks : ROUTINES
35 “___ World” (“Sesame Street” segment) : ELMO’S
36 Crack, so to speak : STAB
39 Stir-fry ingredient : SNAP PEA
42 Unrelenting : STEELY
43 Used as a rendezvous point : MET AT
44 Insignificant : PETTY
45 Birthplace of Malcolm X : OMAHA
46 Unit of cryptocurrency : TOKEN
47 Adjusts to zero, in a way : TARES
51 They might be tapped out : ALES
52 Lizzo title lyric repeated three times before “Make a girl go crazy” : BOYS
54 “How ___ …” : ODD
55 What curly brackets denote, in mathematics : SET

14 thoughts on “0306-21 NY Times Crossword 6 Mar 21, Saturday”

  1. 12:08. Pretty smooth; nothing got me seriously hung up. A bit faster than a typical Saturday for me.

    1. For the record also, carb loading is usually 1-3 days before the event, depending on how its done. If an athlete eats enough carbs to actually get the body to store it as glycogen only a few hours before the event, said athlete will have a very unpleasant race… 🙂

  2. 23:02 I was slow and fast on this one. Got almost nothing on the first two passes then something clicked and I was halfway done in about 12 minutes. Then blank for 3-4 minutes and a flurry of solving in the SE corner. Another 4-5 minutes of staring and and then a two minute dash to fill in the whole SW (and more) corner.

    We having Indian food this evening, but not with 25D, my wife 33A
    me.

  3. 24:09. Like everyone else I found this pretty easy except when it wasn’t. AFC South squad gave me fits since no team fit. THE added to COLTS – duh.

    Roald DAHL wrote a book called “The Twits”? I can’t reconcile that with the guy who wrote “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”.

    Best –

  4. 11:02, no errors. Definitely not what I expect out of a Saturday puzzle here…

    Re Yesterday: Newsday puts out a pretty good Saturday puzzle that’s about 1.5-2x difficulty of this Saturday NYT at the moment. You can flip to yesterday’s blog post for where the link was posted if you want to try it.

  5. Fast and slow.. I guess that was true for me too. Didn’t know 37A or 9D. Let the crosses fill in. But I got the last letter of 9D wrong. Y instead of T. So 37A was RITAORA.. as we all know!!!

    Then I had 39D as SNOWPEA for a long time. I didn’t want to give that up. Then there was 36D STAR? STAB?… But then I focused on the science project and then those all fell.

  6. Got hung up a bit in the west because I stubbornly clung to INDCOLTS
    until I realized via crosses that it was THE (Duh). No errors, but got lucky with some names unknown to me.

  7. @Dave …

    I posted an explanation of my fascination with that Newsday puzzle called “Argon” on yesterday’s (0305) blog …

  8. 20:23, no errors. So many leaps of faith today; just tossing in an answer and to see if any crosses made sense; then justifying the answer with the clue, after the fact. 36D, for example, initially entered BLAB; then the crosses changed it to STAB. Justified STAB by: taking a ‘crack’ at something is the same as taking a ‘STAB’ at something. Last entry was the ‘T’ cross between CAROL ALT/RITA ORA; only because I vaguely remembered Carol Alt.

  9. 1:06:06 with 1 error…I had Jib for Jab at 50A…I relied heavily on “my notes from previous puzzles” on this one.
    For 6D I kept thinking American Dental Association so the answer didn’t make sense until I read Bills explanation..I just got back from a dental visit after a years absence due to COVID fears.
    Stay safe😀

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