0203-21 NY Times Crossword 3 Feb 21, Wednesday

Constructed by: Yacob Yonas
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer(s): John Lewis

Themed answers each to the civil rights icon JOHN LEWIS, who we sadly lost in July, 2020:

  • 35A Civil rights icon who led a historic march from Selma to Montgomery on 3/7/1965 : JOHN LEWIS
  • 16A Principle of the type of activism practiced by 35-Across : NONVIOLENCE
  • 19A Congressional district represented by 35-Across from 1987 to 2020 : GEORGIA’S FIFTH
  • 53A Group including 35-Across that protested the segregation of public buses : FREEDOM RIDERS
  • 58A Oxymoronic coinage of 35-Across : GOOD TROUBLE

Bill’s time: 8m 26s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Some trivia venues : PUBS

Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

5 Airport queue : CABS

A hansom cab is a very specific design of horse and buggy that was patented by Joseph Hansom in 1834 in England. The “cab” in the name is short for “cabriolet”, an earlier design of carriage on which the hansom was based. It’s from “hansom cab” that we get our modern term “cab”.

9 Bookend letters of “Google Maps,” appropriately : GPS

Three of the “bookend” letters of the term “Google Maps”, the starting and ending letters, are “G-PS”.

12 Oscar ___, star of “Inside Llewyn Davis” : ISAAC

Oscar Isaac is an actor from Guatemala who was raised in Miami. Before acting, Isaac played lead guitar in his own band, called the Blinking Underdogs. Isaac plays X-wing pilot Poe Dameron in several of the “Star Wars” movies.

“Inside Llewyn Davis” is a 2013 film from the Coen brothers that stars Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan and John Goodman. The movie is about a week in the life of a folk singer in New York City in the early sixties. “Inside Llewyn Davis” has been well received, but based on the trailers I’ve seen, it looks a little too depressing for my taste. I could be wrong …

14 Unit of courage? : OUNCE

“An ounce of courage”.

15 Face card in a French deck : ROI

In French, a “roi” (king) might be found in a “palais” (palace).

18 Zoom, for one : APP

Zoom is a videoconferencing app that became remarkably popular in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. The market deemed Zoom to be the easiest to use of the free videoconferencing apps. I’ve been using it, but really prefer Google’s Meet offering …

27 Popular cryptocurrency : BITCOIN

Bitcoins are digital units of currency that are used on some Internet sites. Bitcoins are the most popular alternative currency used on the Web today. More and more reputable online retailers are accepting bitcoins, including Overstock.com, Expedia, Dell and Microsoft.

30 The “O” of A.O.C. : OCASIO

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a politician who is often referred to by her initials “AOC”. A Democrat, she was first elected to the US House of Representatives in 2018, representing part of the Bronx, Queens and Rikers Island in New York City. When she took office in 2019 at the age of 29, AOC became the youngest woman ever to serve in Congress.

34 Years abroad : ANOS

In Spanish, an “año” (year) is a “periodo de tiempo” (time frame, period of time).

35 Civil rights icon who led a historic march from Selma to Montgomery on 3/7/1965 : JOHN LEWIS

John Lewis was a civil rights leader, and a prominent leader in the 1963 March on Washington in which Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. Lewis also suffered a fractured skull as he walked at the head of the march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma on Bloody Sunday. Lewis was elected to the US House of Representatives in 1987, and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011 by President Obama. Lewis passed away in 2020.

The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day. The route of the march is memorialized as a US National Historic Trail called the Selma to Montgomery Voting Rights Trail.

40 Like much avant-garde music : ATONAL

Atonal music is not written in any particular key, and therefore does not have a key signature. I’m not a fan, not at all …

Someone or something described as avant-garde is especially innovative. “Avant-garde” is French for “advance guard”.

41 ___ Tomé and Príncipe : SAO

The Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe is an island nation off the west coast of Africa comprising mainly two islands: São Tomé and Príncipe. São Tomé and Príncipe is located in the Gulf of Guinea, off the coast of Gabon. It was colonized by Portugal after POrtuguese explorers discovered the islands in the 15th century. After gaining independence in 1975, São Tomé and Príncipe became the smallest Portuguese-speaking country in the world.

44 Flower that shares its name with a sea creature : ANEMONE

The name “anemone” means “daughter of the wind” in Greek, and at one time it was believed that the wind was what actually caused the flower to bloom. The sea anemone is named for the terrestrial plant even though the sea anemone isn’t a plant at all. The sea anemone is a predatory animal found on the ocean floor.

57 ___ card : ATM

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then “PIN number” is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then “ATM machine” is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

58 Oxymoronic coinage of 35-Across : GOOD TROUBLE

The word “oxymoron” is in itself an oxymoron. It is derived from the Greek words “Oxys” and “moros” meaning “sharp” and “stupid” respectively.

65 Teri of “Tootsie” : GARR

Actress Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“Tootsie” is a hilarious 1982 comedy starring Dustin Hoffman in the title role, a male actor who adopts a female identity in order to land an acting job. Jessica Lange won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance in the film. “Tootsie” also provided Geena Davis with her first movie role.

Down

2 Grp. that brought Stephen Colbert to Baghdad : USO

The United Service Organization (USO) was founded in 1941 at the request of President Franklin D. Roosevelt “to handle the on-leave recreation of the men in the armed forces”. A USO tour is undertaken by a troupe of entertainers, many of whom are big-name celebrities. A USO tour usually includes troop locations in combat zones.

Stephen Colbert is a political satirist who hosted his own show on Comedy Central, “The Colbert Report”. Colbert’s first love was theater, and so he studied to become an actor. He then moved into comedy, and ended up on the “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart”. He left “The Daily Show” in 2005 to set up his own spin-off, “The Colbert Report”. In his own inimitable way, Colbert likes to use a “French” pronunciation for the name of his show, so “The Colbert Report” comes out as “The Col-bear Rep-oar”. Colbert took over the “Late Show” when David Letterman retired.

7 Secretly includes on an email : BCCS

A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

9 Sue who wrote the so-called “alphabet series” : GRAFTON

Sue Grafton wrote detective novels, and her “alphabet series” feature the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with “’A’ Is for Alibi” in 1982 and worked her way up to “‘Y’ is for Yesterday” before she passed away in 2017.

10 Destiny’s Child or the Supremes : POP TRIO

Destiny’s Child was an R&B group active from 1990 to 2006. The trio’s lineup changed over the years, and probably the most famous former member of the group is Beyoncé Knowles.

The Supremes were the most successful vocal group in US history based on number-one hits. The group started out in 1959 as a four-member lineup called the Primettes. The name was changed to the Supremes in 1961. One member dropped out in 1962, leaving the Supremes as a trio. Lead singer Diana Ross began to garner much of the attention, which eventually led to a further name change, to Diana Ross & the Supremes.

13 A.F.L.-___ : CIO

The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was founded in 1886, making it one of the first federations of unions in the country. Over time the AFL became dominated by craft unions, unions representing skilled workers of particular disciplines. In the early thirties, John L. Lewis led a movement within the AFL to organize workers by industry, believing this would be more effective for the members. But the craft unions refused to budge, so Lewis set up a rival federation of unions in 1932, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). The two federations became bitter rivals for over two decades until finally merging in 1955 to form the AFL-CIO.

14 One of the sisters in Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” : OLGA

Olga, Masha and Irina are the “Three Sisters” in the play by Anton Chekhov. The three title characters were inspired by the three Brontë sisters, the English authors.

17 Mercury or Venus, e.g. : ORB

Mercury is the smallest of the planets in our solar system, and is the nearest to the Sun. Mercury orbits the sun relatively rapidly compared to the other planets, and this fact may have led to it being given the name “Mercury”, the Roman deity who was the speedy messenger to the gods.

The planet Venus is the second brightest object in the night sky, after our Moon.

20 Ancient Andeans : INCAS

The Inca Empire was known as the Tawantinsuyu, which translates as “land of the four quarters”. The Inca Empire was a federal organization having a central government that sat above four “suyu” or “quarters”, four administrative regions.

The Andes range is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world. It runs down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles, from Venezuela in the north to Chile in the south. The highest peak in the Andes is Mt. Aconcagua in Argentina, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth’s surface from the center of the planet. That’s because of the equatorial “bulge” around the Earth’s “waist”.

21 Classic TV brand : RCA

During WWI, the US government actively discouraged the loss of certain technologies to other countries, including allies. The developing wireless technologies were considered to be particularly important by the army and navy. The government prevented the General Electric Company from selling equipment to the British Marconi Company, and instead facilitated the purchase by GE of the American Marconi subsidiary. This purchase led to GE forming the Radio Corporation of America that we know today as RCA.

22 Elf’s foe in “The Lord of the Rings” : ORC

In Tolkien’s “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings”, Elves are an immortal race that inhabit Middle-earth and Valinor.

26 Can, in Canterbury : LOO

It has been suggested that the British term “loo”, meaning “toilet”, comes from “Waterloo” (water closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo”, in which the pot was called the loo!

Canterbury is a city in the southeast of England, in the county of Kent. Canterbury is famous for Canterbury Cathedral where Thomas Becket was murdered in 1170, making it a pilgrimage destination for Christians. It was one of these pilgrimages that was the inspiration for Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales” written in the 14th century.

31 Jackie of “Rush Hour” : CHAN

Jackie Chan is an actor from Hong Kong who is noted for his action and martial arts films. When Chan was 17-years-old he featured as a stunt actor in Bruce Lee movies. He also starred in the 1982 Hong Kong action film “Dragon Lord” which includes a fight scene that required an amazing 2900 takes, a record in the movie industry.

35 Foxx of “Soul” : JAMIE

Jamie Foxx is the professional name used by Eric Marlon Bishop, an actor from Terrell, Texas. Foxx is a very versatile entertainer. He is an Oscar-winning actor (for playing the title role in “Ray”), and a Grammy Award winning musician. He is also a stand-up comedian and a talk-radio host.

37 Butter and margarine, nutritionally speaking : BAD FATS

LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is one of the compounds responsible for transporting fats around the body. When LDL is combined with cholesterol it can be referred to as “bad cholesterol”. This is because LDL actually transports cholesterol into the inner walls of blood vessels leading to atherosclerosis.

47 Popular Japanese manga series : NARUTO

“Naruto” is a manga comic series from Japan that has been adapted into a television anime show. A censored version of the TV show (to remove gore, bad language, smoking etc.) shows on the Cartoon Network here in the US.

49 #1 at McDonalds, maybe : ORDER

I think that there’s an apostrophe missing in “McDonald’s” here …

54 “Return of the Jedi” dancer : OOLA

Oola was a slave-girl dancer who was eaten by a scary creature in the movie “Star Wars Episode VI: The Return of the Jedi”. Oola was played by British actor Femi Taylor.

56 Dawn goddess : EOS

In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora. Rather delightfully, Homer referred to Eos as “rosy-fingered dawn” in both “Iliad” and “Odyssey”.

60 Chicago trains : ELS

Elevated railroad (El)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Some trivia venues : PUBS
5 Airport queue : CABS
9 Bookend letters of “Google Maps,” appropriately : GPS
12 Oscar ___, star of “Inside Llewyn Davis” : ISAAC
14 Unit of courage? : OUNCE
15 Face card in a French deck : ROI
16 Principle of the type of activism practiced by 35-Across : NONVIOLENCE
18 Zoom, for one : APP
19 Congressional district represented by 35-Across from 1987 to 2020 : GEORGIA’S FIFTH
21 Live (together) : ROOM
23 Outlaw : BAN
24 Starter course? : INTRO
25 Heartless : CRUEL
27 Popular cryptocurrency : BITCOIN
29 Do something : ACT
30 The “O” of A.O.C. : OCASIO
34 Years abroad : ANOS
35 Civil rights icon who led a historic march from Selma to Montgomery on 3/7/1965 : JOHN LEWIS
37 Japan’s largest lake, located NE of Kyoto : BIWA
40 Like much avant-garde music : ATONAL
41 ___ Tomé and Príncipe : SAO
44 Flower that shares its name with a sea creature : ANEMONE
46 Natural ability : KNACK
48 Trickster : DEVIL
49 Sharp or flat, say : OFF
52 Those in favor : AYES
53 Group including 35-Across that protested the segregation of public buses : FREEDOM RIDERS
57 ___ card : ATM
58 Oxymoronic coinage of 35-Across : GOOD TROUBLE
61 Impossible N.B.A. game outcome : TIE
62 Some succulents : ALOES
63 Seat at a counter, maybe : STOOL
64 Took a load off : SAT
65 Teri of “Tootsie” : GARR
66 “My mistake!” : OOPS!

Down

1 Balloon popper, perhaps : PIN
2 Grp. that brought Stephen Colbert to Baghdad : USO
3 Do quickly, as an assignment : BANG OUT
4 “Help!” : SAVE ME!
5 Signal as a conductor might : CUE IN
6 Actress ___ Deavere Smith : ANNA
7 Secretly includes on an email : BCCS
8 Deem appropriate : SEE FIT
9 Sue who wrote the so-called “alphabet series” : GRAFTON
10 Destiny’s Child or the Supremes : POP TRIO
11 Sucks up, in a way : SIPHONS
13 A.F.L.-___ : CIO
14 One of the sisters in Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” : OLGA
17 Mercury or Venus, e.g. : ORB
20 Ancient Andeans : INCAS
21 Classic TV brand : RCA
22 Elf’s foe in “The Lord of the Rings” : ORC
26 Can, in Canterbury : LOO
27 Common reply to “Cómo estás?” : BIEN
28 Only state with a two-vowel postal code : IOWA
31 Jackie of “Rush Hour” : CHAN
32 Starting stake : ANTE
33 ___-mo replay : SLO
35 Foxx of “Soul” : JAMIE
36 Sort : ILK
37 Butter and margarine, nutritionally speaking : BAD FATS
38 Sluggishness : INERTIA
39 “No need to introduce us” : WE’VE MET
41 Utters a sound, informally : SAYS BOO
42 Nail, as a test : ACE
43 Green-lights : OKS
45 Pie in the face, e.g. : OLD GAG
47 Popular Japanese manga series : NARUTO
49 #1 at McDonalds, maybe : ORDER
50 Suits : FITS
51 First sitting prez to fly in an airplane : FDR
54 “Return of the Jedi” dancer : OOLA
55 Secure, as a ship : MOOR
56 Dawn goddess : EOS
59 Chop or crop : LOP
60 Chicago trains : ELS

22 thoughts on “0203-21 NY Times Crossword 3 Feb 21, Wednesday”

  1. 12:23. A few rough spots. Didn’t know NARUTO. Liked the clue for OUNCE.

    I’ve used Zoom, but I prefer Ring Central which is what I’ve been using recently. Never used Google’s Meet, but maybe I’ll give it a try.

    Best –

  2. @Joe (from yesterday’s blog) …

    Well, since I can’t seem to fall asleep, I’ll make a couple of comments: The “advantage” you posit for an online solver is a hypothetical one that, as far as I know, no one here is taking advantage of without explicitly saying that they have done so. If I enter a guess in the final square of the grid and I don’t get the “success” message and I enter an alternate guess that does give me the message, my report will be something like “11:17 after finding and fixing an error”. Note the use of that word: ERROR! (I would undoubtedly then go on to say, in my own rambling senior-citizen way, exactly what the nature of the error was.)

    I disagree that crossword puzzles are solely about knowing words. I often do puzzles in which I am unfamiliar with many of the words in the clues and at least some of the words in the answers. The beauty of a crossword puzzle is that the answers have to fit together and one can frequently use that, together with a sense of what phrases one is likely to encounter in English, to come up with entries that one has never before imagined. For example, earlier this evening, in the latest Tim Croce puzzle, I managed to come up with the phrase “CHEER MOM” (for the clue “Pyramid-building witness, likely”), a concept sufficiently close to “SOCCER MOM” so that I was willing to go with it. Now there was a moment to be proud of (if you’ll allow me to pat myself on the back a little): the sort of thing that I do crosswords for.

    Another comment: Competition is a healthy thing, I guess, but I deplore the extent to which it sometimes invades the blog. For example, in emulation of Bill, I give my solving times, but I am sorely tempted to stop doing it. Being able to whip through a puzzle in seconds is not high on my list of the pleasures to be had from doing them.

    And, to repeat my initial argument concerning the nature of “online solves”, I’m typing this on my iMac; I would have found it too annoying to try to enter it on my iPad Mini, given the number of fat-fingerings that I would have had to laboriously correct. (Again, if you really want to understand why it took me weeks to make my peace with solving on an iPad Mini, you simply have to get one and try it for yourself.)

  3. @Joe
    It’s hard to track these things on a heavily posted blog like this, so it’s hard to know if you commented on this before yesterday (the language you use tells me yes, but I scrolled back to Jan 15 and didn’t see anything). Anyhow, @A Nonny Muss wrote something that I responded to on Jan 21 which you can go back and read. He missed the point, but it is there. Online solving is a much different exercise than paper solving. FWIW, most software counts doing what you described as an error, sometimes to major fault when it comes to making typos. But you are onto something, as I will testify I used to do that exact thing with multiple squares all through the puzzle while I was learning until I realized how absurd it was and how it was keeping me from learning how to do crosswords. As I wrote then, I tend to ignore such cues and just go with whatever I finish with, assuming I don’t already know something is wrong, then I go ahead and fix it.

    @A Nonny Muss
    Not so much a specific response, but addressing some things…

    Crosswords *are* about knowing words. You may not know the exact thing that matches a clue, but you have to know a word or phrase *is* a thing. The whole “I don’t really know 80-90% of a grid” comments I make about any puzzle usually get distilled into a “oh yeah this is the only thing it could be” about 80% of the time.

    I talk about experiencing the exact opposite thing you write about with Croce (and others) simply because the language is such that I can’t really BE certain a thing is what he means. This also means I almost always DNF his puzzles with a dozen or so errors because I went down entirely different paths. Granted, I run into hard grids where that doesn’t happen (the last one in the Ries set I just finished along with a few others I run into is very fascinating in that regard). At some point, you got to know the word that’s in the grid and know the clue means that, or you get nowhere with a crossword.

    I’ve talked much about the timing and competition thing before too. I hate people think it’s a competition too, but I kind of grope for a “how well did I do on this puzzle” measure, especially since I rarely never not finish most mainstream stuff or get errors these days. People bristle when I start getting into the “was this a good puzzle?” and “did I enjoy doing it?” measures, so really time is the only thing left that seems to be acceptable around here.

  4. Re: Times, competition, paper vs laptop, etc.

    This seems to be a fairly male-dominated blog, but I’m sure there are plenty of women too, so I thought I’d put in my two cents.

    Up to a couple years ago I never did a crossword in my life, which is odd because I’ve always loved words, grammar, etc. When I started I took a loooong time to finish a Monday puzzle and now I can usually finish the Saturday daily and long puzzle without too many look-ups. Contrary to the rules, I don’t consider the look-ups to be avoided – how else are you going to learn? The thing is to remember for next time. I do the crossword with a pencil in our daily paper so am not bothered by all the little electronic prompts and scoldings you all talk about (thank goodness!), and rather than rush through I like to take my time and enjoy the puzzle. I’ll even stop and Google an interesting clue – I’ve learned much more geography (among other things) than I ever did in my long-ago school days.

    But I really enjoy reading everybody’s comments, and do so every day. Just thought I’d put in a different POV.

    Cheers to you all, Lisa

    1. Thanks, Lisa … and I applaud your attitude toward crosswords. I started doing them almost 70 years ago and I’m delighted that there was no one around to tell me that looking things up was cheating (as, of course, it wasn’t).

      Most of of my research now happens after my solves, but … in the course of doing more than 400 Croce puzzles, I have, on three occasions, given myself permission to use Google at will (short of looking at an answer key – I do view that as cheating). As I recall, it still took me an hour or more to do each of those puzzles.)

      So … excelsior! … onward and upward! … 🤪.

    2. Don’t think too many are going to complain as long as you’re honest about whatever it is…if you gotta look something up look it up. But admit it and most here will be just fine with it. 🙂

  5. @Glenn …

    IMHO, in the comments on the January 21st blog, it was you who completely missed the point of my “rant”. As I said then: The phrase “online solve” has meaning only with respect to a particular combination of device, app, and solver. It is therefore not correct to make a blanket statement that online solving is always easier than pen-and-paper solving. In order to fully understand this, you would need to do the experiment I suggested: Get an iPad Mini, learn to use it as effectively as I do (i.e., not very), and do the NYT puzzles using the NYT app for a few weeks.

    I essentially always finish Croce’s puzzles, even though it frequently (almost always?) takes me a long time to get a beachhead established and they almost always have entries that are completely unfamiliar to me. (Looking over the last three of them, I see “TRAP GAME”, “K-TEL”, “MUSEUM OF FAILURE”, “STAR ALLIANCE”, “A MAN DOWN”, “BI-ERASURE”, “SEA-DOO”, “L SEVEN”, “KARMA FARM”, “SUSHI BURRITO”, “AGED LIKE MILK”, “U CONN HUSKIES”, “ITCH MITE”, “CHEER MOM”, “MOSBY”, and “OPTIMO”. And those are just grid entries; I’ve left out all the obscure references in the clues.)

    I often marvel that it is possible, given the misleading nature of a lot of Croce’s clues, to solve one of his puzzles. What seems to happen is a sort of gestalt gelling of all the possible entries in a chunk of the puzzle, so that, even though one may not be sure of any particular answer in it, it is clear that there is only one way to fill that chunk. (This is why, some time ago, I expressed interest in having a solving tool that would give me a graph of progress versus time. I suspect, for Croce’s puzzles, such a graph would have a number of jumps interspersed with plateaus.) The errors that I make in Croce’s puzzles usually occur because of what I call “personal Naticks”.

    Your complaints about what you used to characterize as “miscommunication” on the part of setters and editors have always mystified me. Deceptive cluing – phrases that have more than one possible meaning – are an integral part of the crossword scene. The howls of outrage over end-of-week puzzles on the LAT blog from the likes of “he-who-once-earned-the-nickname-Eeyore-on-this-blog” are from people who simply don’t understand and appreciate that aspect of the genre.

    Okay, enough … I can’t sit here any longer. (About three weeks ago, my back went “out”. After seven days on Flexeril and many days of cautious therapy, I’m beginning to think my back may once more be “in”, but … ya’ just never know. If there were a way to travel back in time and tell a distant ancestor not to get up on two legs, I might do it. Of course, there’s always the possibility that the development of cruciverbalism depended on bipedalism and I’d hate to be the cause of a major loss to the human race … 😜.)

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