0312-23 NY Times Crossword 12 Mar 23, Sunday

Constructed by: David Tuffs
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: This and That

Themed answers match the first part of the corresponding clue. Shaded letters (SSS) and circled letters (CCC) within each answer spell out a phrase that matches the second part, in the format “SSS and CCC”:

  • 22A One in charge of Brownies and cookies? / Easy to understand : GIRL SCOUT LEADER / LOUD and CLEAR
  • 31A Post-dryer chore / Splendid : FOLDING THE LAUNDRY / FINE and DANDY
  • 45A One whom the bride and groom didn’t invite / Steal a meal : WEDDING CRASHER / DINE and DASH
  • 62A Utopia / Occasionally, poetically : HEAVEN ON EARTH / EVER and ANON
  • 82A German deli meat / Discussion : BLACK FOREST HAM / BACK and FORTH
  • 96A They might result in booby prizes / Physical discomforts : LAST-PLACE FINISHES / ACHES and PAINS
  • 109A Issue featuring celebrity issues / Repeatedly : TABLOID MAGAZINE / TIME and AGAIN

Bill’s time: 21m 40s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • ANODYNE (anodine)
  • Y’HEAR? (I hear?!)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Emulate Rockin’ Robin, in a 1958 hit : BOP

1995’s “Rockin’ Robin” was the only number-one hit for rock and roll singer Bobby Day. The song was famously covered by Michael Jackson in 1972.

Rockin’ robin, (tweet-tweet-tweet)
Rock-rock-rockin’ robin’ (tweet-tweedilly-tweet)
Go rockin’ robin ’cause we’re really gonna rock tonight (tweet-tweedilly-tweet)

20 Hemingway’s home for over 20 years : CUBA

Ernest Hemingway moved around a lot. He was born in Illinois, and after leaving school headed to the Italian front during WWI. There he served as an ambulance driver, an experience he used as inspiration for “A Farewell to Arms”. He returned to the US after being seriously wounded, but a few years later moved to Paris where he worked as a foreign correspondent. He covered the Spanish War as a journalist, from Spain, using this experience for “For Whom the Bell Tolls”. During the thirties and forties he had two permanent residences, one in Key West, Florida and one in Cuba. In the late fifties he moved to Ketchum, Idaho, where he committed suicide in 1961.

21 Skate park trick : OLLIE

An ollie is a skateboarding trick invented in 1976 by Alan “Ollie” Gelfand. Apparently it’s a way of lifting the board off the ground, while standing on it, without touching the board with one’s hands. Yeah, I could do that …

22 One in charge of Brownies and cookies? / Easy to understand : GIRL SCOUT LEADER / LOUD and CLEAR

Brownies are members of the Girl Guiding organization who are seven to ten years old. When the group was founded in 1914 by Lord Baden-Powell, they were known as Rosebuds. That name wasn’t popular with the membership and so was changed, taking inspiration from an 1870 story by Juliana Horatia Ewing called “The Brownies”.

29 Feature of an ungulate : HOOF

Ungulates are hoofed animals. “Ungulate” comes from the Latin “ungula” meaning “hoof” or “claw”, which in turn comes from “unguis” meaning “nail”.

37 Shawkat of “Arrested Development” : ALIA

Alia Shawkat is an actor who might be best known for playing Maeby Fünke on the sitcom “Arrested Development”. Shawkat is best friends with fellow actor Elliot Page (formerly Ellen Page), whom she met while filming the 2009 movie “Whip It”.

39 Steamed Chinese bun : BAO

A baozi (also “bou, bao”) is a steamed, filled bun in Chinese cuisine.

53 Predators whose genus name translates to “of the kingdom of the dead” : ORCAS

The taxonomic name for the killer whale is “Orcinus orca”. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

54 Moonfish : OPAH

“Opah” is the more correct name for the fish also known as the sunfish, moonfish or Jerusalem haddock. I’ve seen one in the Monterey Aquarium. It is one huge fish …

56 Speaker of the catchphrase “Did I do that?” on 1990s TV : URKEL

Steve Urkel is a character on the TV show “Family Matters” that originally aired in the late eighties and nineties. The Urkel character was the archetypal “geek”, played by Jaleel White. Urkel was originally written into the show’s storyline for just one episode, but before long, Urkel was the show’s most popular recurring character.

57 Inoffensive : ANODYNE

Something described as “anodyne” is analgesic, capable of removing pain. “Anodyne” comes from the Greek “an-” meaning “without” and “odyne” meaning “pain”.

62 Utopia / Occasionally, poetically : HEAVEN ON EARTH / EVER and ANON

The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in his book “Utopia” published in 1516 to describe an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek “ou” meaning “not” and “topos” meaning “place”. By calling his perfect island “Not Place”, More was apparently making the point that he didn’t think that the ideal could actually exist.

79 Akbar’s tomb locale : AGRA

Agra is a medieval city on the banks of the river Yamuna in India that was the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1556 to 1658. The city is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

  • The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
  • Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
  • Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal architecture.

Akbar the Great was Mughal Emperor from 1556 until his death in 1605. Akbar’s reign was a successful one for the empire, as he consolidated the Mughal influence in the whole of the Indian subcontinent. Akbar made significant social reforms that improved the lives of women, legalizing the remarriage of widows and raising the legal age of marriage. He also banned “sati”, the practice whereby a widow immolated herself on the funeral pyre of her husband.

82 German deli meat / Discussion : BLACK FOREST HAM / BACK and FORTH

The Black Forest (“Schwarzwald” in German) is a mountainous region in southwestern Germany that is so called because of its rich covering of trees. It is the source of the Danube, the second-longest river in Europe.

88 M.L.B. player with over 600 career home runs, to fans : A-ROD

Baseball player Alex Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod”, hit his 600th home run on August 4th, 2010. He had hit his 500th home run exactly three years earlier, on August 4th, 2007, when he became the youngest player in Major League history to join the 500-home run club.

90 Poehler of “Inside Out” : AMY

Amy Poehler was a cast member on “Saturday Night Live” from 2001 to 2008, notable for appearing in many great sketches, including those where she played Hillary Clinton opposite Tina Fey’s Sarah Palin. Poehler also starred with Fey in the 2008 movie “Baby Mama”. And, Poehler led the cast of the sitcom “Parks and Recreation” for its seven-season run.

“Inside Out” is a 2015 Pixar animated feature film. It’s all about a young girl who relocates with her family from Minnesota to San Francisco. The movie’s action is actually set inside the girl’s head, as five personified emotions deal with the changes she has to face. Those emotions are voiced by:

  • Amy Poehler (Joy)
  • Phyllis Smith (Sadness)
  • Lewis Black (Anger)
  • Bill Hader (Fear)
  • Mindy Kaling (Disgust)

101 “Sportsman of the Century,” per Sports Illustrated : ALI

Boxer Muhammad Ali is recognized on both sides of the Atlantic as one of the greatest sports figures of the 1900s. In 1999, Ali was named “Sportsman of the Century” by “Sports Illustrated” and “Sports Personality of the Century” by the BBC.

107 “Don’t Matter” singer, 2007 : AKON

Akon is a Senegalese American R&B and hip hop singer, who was born in St. Louis but lived much of his early life in Senegal. Akon is a stage name, and his real name is Aliaune Damala Bouga Time Bongo Puru Nacka Lu Lu Lu Badara Akon Thiam. Got that?

109 Issue featuring celebrity issues / Repeatedly : TABLOID MAGAZINE / TIME and AGAIN

“Tabloid” is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs Wellcome) for a “small tablet of medicine”, a name that goes back to 1884. The word “tabloid” had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in “tabloid journalism”, which described newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

112 “Bloody” English monarch : MARY I

Mary I was Queen of England and Ireland from 1553 to 1558. Mary was the only surviving child from the marriage of King Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. Unlike her father, Mary adhered to her Roman Catholic faith and was noted for her brutal persecution of Protestants during her reign. She had almost three hundred religious dissenters burned at the stake, resulting in her gaining the nickname “Bloody Mary”. Roman Catholic rule was reversed after she died, when her half-sister Elizabeth I succeeded to the throne.

114 John known as the “Father of the National Parks” : MUIR

John Muir was a famous American naturalist, although he was born in Scotland. Muir founded the Sierra Club in 1892. He published “My First Summer in the Sierra” in 1911, which described one of Muir’s favorite places in the country, the Sierra Nevada range in California.

117 2012 Seth MacFarlane film with a 2015 sequel : TED

“Ted” is a 2012 movie written, directed, produced and starring Seth MacFarlane. In the story, MacFarlane voices a somewhat irreverent teddy bear who is the best friend of a character played by Mark Wahlberg. The audiences liked the film, and “Ted 2” followed in 2015.

Down

2 Feminist writer Jong : ERICA

Author Erica Jong’s most famous work is her first: “Fear of Flying”, a novel published in 1973. Over twenty years later, Jong wrote “Fear of Fifty: a midlife memoir”, published in 1994.

3 Westminster competitor : PUREBRED DOG

The first Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was held in 1877, which makes it the second oldest sporting event in the country (narrowly beaten out by the Kentucky Derby that was first run in 1875). The show was originally limited to gun dogs and was established by a group of hunters who routinely met at the Westminster Hotel in Manhattan, New York.

4 Popular French periodical : ELLE

“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”. “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

10 Siddhartha Gautama by another name : BUDDHA

Gautama Buddha was the sage on whose teachings the Buddhist tradition was founded. It is generally believed that the Buddha was born as Siddhartha Gautama in Kapilavastu in present-day Nepal, in about 563 BCE.

11 Like Nero Wolfe : OBESE

Nero Wolfe is a fictional detective and the hero of many stories published by author Rex Stout. There are 33 Nero Wolfe novels for us to read, and 39 short stories. There are also movie adaptations of two of the novels: “Meet Nero Wolfe” (1936) which features a young Rita Hayworth, and “The League of Frightened Men” (1937). One of Wolfe’s endearing traits is his love of good food and beer, so he is a pretty rotund character.

12 One getting out early : PAROLEE

“Parole” is a French word that we use in English, with the French “parole” meaning “word, speech”. Of particular interest is the French phrase “parole d’honneur” which translates as “word of honor”. In the early 1600s we started using “parole” to mean a promise by a prisoner of war not to escape, as in the prisoner giving his “word of honor” not to run off. Over time, parole has come to mean conditional release of a prisoner before he or she has served the full term of a sentence.

13 California’s ___ Tree National Park : JOSHUA

“Joshua tree” is the common name for the plant species more correctly called Yucca brevifolia. One of the best places to see Joshua trees is in the beautiful Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California. The plant was named by Mormon settlers crossing the Mojave Desert in the mid-1800s. The name was chosen as the shape of the tree reminded the settlers of Joshua reaching his hands to the sky in prayer.

14 Brown of the Food Network : ALTON

Alton Brown is a celebrity chef who is behind the Food Network show “Good Eats”, and is the host of “Iron Chef America”.

15 Donation center : BLOOD BANK

Prior to 1915, blood transfusions were carried out directly, from a vein of the donor into a vein of the recipient. All that changed pretty quickly when it was discovered that sodium citrate could be added to blood to stop it coagulating. Soon, it was clear that refrigerated blood treated with an anticoagulant could be stored, and blood “depots” were created in Britain during WWI. The term “blood bank” was first used in 1937, to describe the store of blood kept in the Cook County Hospital in Chicago.

16 Paris-based carrier : AIR FRANCE

Air France is my favorite airline (okay … after Aer Lingus, the Irish airline). I used to fly Air France a lot (I lived in France for a while), but haven’t done so since the company merged with KLM in 2004. Back in 2008, Air France-KLM was the world’s largest airline in terms of revenue.

17 Tiny prop : TEE

A tee is a small device on which, say, a golf ball is placed before striking it. The term “tee” comes from the Scottish “teaz”, which described little heaps of sand used to elevate a golf ball for the purpose of getting a clean hit with a club.

31 Stereotypical name for a female poodle : FIFI

The standard poodle breed of dog is considered by many to be the second-most intelligent breed, after the border collie. The name “poodle” comes from a Low German word meaning “to splash about”, reflecting the original use of the breed as a water retriever.

33 Calculus calculation : AREA

Remember doing calculus at school, and all those derivatives and integrals? Well, you probably also remember that an integral calculates the area under a curve (for example), and a derivative calculates the slope of a tangent at a particular point on a curve.

40 Sierra ___ : LEONE

The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa that lies on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the “Black Poor” of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of “a problem”, three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were granted British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that’s today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

41 TV monitor, in brief? : FCC

TV broadcasting is monitored by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC has been around since 1934, when it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.

42 Glass of “This American Life” : IRA

Ira Glass is a well-respected presenter on American Public Radio who is perhaps best known for his show “This American Life”. I was interested to learn that one of my favorite composers, Philip Glass, is Ira’s first cousin.

43 Praise for a diva : BRAVA!

To express appreciation for a male performer at an operatic performance, traditionally one calls out “bravo!”. Appreciation for a female performer is shown by using “brava!”, and for more than one performer of either sex by using “bravi!”

48 Part of a goat or Africa : HORN

The Horn of Africa is that horn-shaped peninsula at the easternmost tip of the continent, containing the countries Eritrea, Djibouti, Ethiopia as well as Somalia. The Horn of Africa is also known as the Somali Peninsula.

51 Behind, in slang : TUSHY

“Tush”, a word meaning “backside”, is an abbreviation of “tochus” that comes from the Yiddish “tokhes”.

55 Lee who wrote “Go Set a Watchman” : HARPER

Nelle Harper Lee was an author from Monroeville, Alabama. For many years, Lee had only one published novel to her name, i.e. “To Kill a Mockingbird”. That contribution to the world of literature was enough to earn her the Presidential Medal of Freedom and a Pulitzer Prize. Harper Lee was a close friend of fellow author Truman Capote who was the inspiration for the character named “Dill” in her novel. Lee was all over the news in 2015 as she had published a second novel, titled “Go Set a Watchman”. The experts seem to be agreeing that “Go Set a Watchman” is actually the first draft of “To Kill a Mockingbird”. Lee passed away less than a year after “Go Set a Watchman” hit the stores.

59 Grift : CON

Grift is money made dishonestly, especially as the result of a swindle. The term is perhaps an alteration of the word “graft”, which can have a similar meaning.

63 What gerunds are formed from : VERBS

A gerund is a form of a verb that can be used as a noun. For example, the gerund of the verb “to solve” is “solving”, as in the phrase “we really enjoyed the solving of the crossword”.

65 “99 Luftballons” singer : NENA

Nena is a German singer (“Nena” became the name of her band as well) who had a big hit in 1984 with one of my favorite songs of the eighties “99 Luftballons”. The English translation of the German title (“99 Red Balloons”) isn’t literal, with the color “red” added just so that the title had the right number of syllables for the tune. “Luftballon” is the name given to a child’s toy balloon in German.

66 Three sheets to the wind : HIGH AS A KITE

A sheet is the rope that is used to control a sail on a sailing vessel. The expression “three sheets to the wind” meaning “drunk” dates back to the early 1800s. It likely derives from the notion that a sailboat with three sails, and with all three sheets slipped out of control, would behave like someone who was drunk, and vice versa.

67 Gumbo vegetables : OKRAS

Gumbo is a type of stew or soup that originated in Louisiana. The primary ingredient can be meat or fish, but to be true gumbo it must include the “holy trinity” of vegetables, namely celery, bell peppers and onion. Okra used to be a requirement but this is no longer the case. Okra gave the dish its name as the vernacular word for the African vegetable is “okingumbo”, from the Bantu language spoken by many of the slaves brought to America.

72 Coup group : CABAL

A cabal is a small group of plotters acting in secret, perhaps scheming against a government or an individual. The use of “cabal” in this way dates back to the mid-1600s. It is suggested that the term gained some popularity, particularly in a sinister sense, during the reign of Charles II in the 1670s. At that time, it was applied as an acronym standing for “Clifford, Arlington, Buckingham, Ashley, and Lauderdale”, a group of ministers known for their plots and schemes.

A coup d’état (often just “coup”) is the sudden overthrow of a government, and comes from the French for “stroke of state”. The Swiss-German word “putsch” is sometimes used instead of “coup”, with “Putsch” translating literally as “sudden blow”. We also use the abbreviated “coup” to mean “sudden, brilliant and successful act”.

74 PT Cruisers, e.g. : CHRYSLERS

Chrysler’s PT Cruiser has lovely retro styling (I think). The look and feel of the car was heavily influenced by the Chrysler Airflow from the 1930s. The PT Cruiser was introduced in 2000, and sadly was withdrawn in 2010.

76 Ohio site of the first Quaker Oats factory : AKRON

For much of the 1800s, the Ohio city of Akron was the fastest-growing city in the country, feeding off the industrial boom of that era. The city was founded in 1825 and its location, along the Ohio and Erie canal connecting Lake Erie with the Ohio River, helped to fuel Akron’s growth. Akron sits at the highest point of the canal and the name “Akron” comes from the Greek word meaning “summit”. Indeed, Akron is the county seat of Summit County. The city earned the moniker “Rubber Capital of the World” for most of the 20th century, as it was home to four major tire companies: Goodrich, Goodyear, Firestone and General Tire.

The Quaker Oats Company was founded in 1901 when four oat mills merged, including the Quaker Mill Company of Ravenna, Ohio. Quaker Mill’s owner Henry Parsons Crowell played the key role in creating the new company and remained at the helm until 1943.

77 NorCal hub : SFO

San Francisco International Airport (SFO) served as the main base of operations for Virgin America (sold to Alaska Airlines), and is also the maintenance hub for United Airlines. Even though SFO is owned and operated by the City and County of San Francisco, the airport is located to the south in San Mateo County.

87 “Fiddlesticks!” : BLAST IT!

We’ve been using “fiddlesticks” to mean “nonsense” since the early 17th century. Prior to that time, “fiddlestick” just referred to the bow of a fiddle.

95 Most of it is found underwater : BERG

An iceberg is a large piece of freshwater ice that is floating freely after having broken away from a glacier or ice shelf. Our use of “iceberg” comes from the Dutch word for the same phenomenon “ijsberg”, which translates literally as “ice mountain”.

99 River through Pakistan : INDUS

The Indus river rises in Tibet and flows through the length of Pakistan before emptying into the Arabian Sea, a part of the Indian Ocean lying to the west of the Indian subcontinent. The Indus gives its name to the country of India as “India” used to be the name of the region along the eastern banks of the river, which paradoxically is now in modern-day Pakistan.

100 Many interstate vehicles : SEMIS

A “semi” is a “semi-trailer truck”. The vehicle is so called because it consists of a tractor and a half-trailer. The half-trailer is so called because it only has wheels on the back end, with the front supported by the tractor.

103 Like noble gases : INERT

An inert gas can be different from a noble gas. Both are relatively non-reactive, but a noble gas is an element. An inert gas might be a compound, i.e. made up of more than one element.

108 “Am I oversharing?” : TMI?

Too much information (TMI)

111 Major health legislation of 2010, in brief : ACA

The correct name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (ACA).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Turn off : REPEL
6 Make a trade : SWAP
10 Emulate Rockin’ Robin, in a 1958 hit : BOP
13 Poke : JAB AT
18 “Go me!” : I RULE!
19 Somewhat, musically : POCO
20 Hemingway’s home for over 20 years : CUBA
21 Skate park trick : OLLIE
22 One in charge of Brownies and cookies? / Easy to understand : GIRL SCOUT LEADER / LOUD and CLEAR
25 Put away for now : STORE
26 Drink with a domed lid : ICEE
27 More than just compact : MINI
28 “Consequently …” : AND SO …
29 Feature of an ungulate : HOOF
30 Dance move used to teach children how to limit spreading germs while sneezing : DAB
31 Post-dryer chore / Splendid : FOLDING THE LAUNDRY / FINE and DANDY
35 Game stoppers : RAINS
37 Shawkat of “Arrested Development” : ALIA
38 It’s a stretch : ERA
39 Steamed Chinese bun : BAO
40 Apt name for a horticulturist? : LEIF
41 Wispy, as hair : FINE
43 Buzzer : BEE
44 Ring or belt, essentially : BAND
45 One whom the bride and groom didn’t invite / Steal a meal : WEDDING CRASHER / DINE and DASH
50 Now : AT ONCE
52 Traveled on horseback : RODE
53 Predators whose genus name translates to “of the kingdom of the dead” : ORCAS
54 Moonfish : OPAH
56 Speaker of the catchphrase “Did I do that?” on 1990s TV : URKEL
57 Inoffensive : ANODYNE
59 Deep cut? : CREVASSE
61 Brit’s clothespin : PEG
62 Utopia / Occasionally, poetically : HEAVEN ON EARTH / EVER and ANON
66 With 72-Across, post-sledding mugful : HOT …
69 Settles the score : GETS EVEN
70 Potential result of a strike : PAY HIKE
72 See 66-Across : … COCOA
75 Green isle : ERIN
76 Plus : ASSET
79 Akbar’s tomb locale : AGRA
80 Despises : ABHORS
82 German deli meat / Discussion : BLACK FOREST HAM / BACK and FORTH
85 One might be raised on a farm : BARN
86 “Washboard” features : ABS
88 M.L.B. player with over 600 career home runs, to fans : A-ROD
89 Mushy ___ (British side dish) : PEAS
90 Poehler of “Inside Out” : AMY
91 Palm product : OIL
92 Mexican capital : PESO
94 Some steel beams : I-BARS
96 They might result in booby prizes / Physical discomforts : LAST-PLACE FINISHES / ACHES and PAINS
101 “Sportsman of the Century,” per Sports Illustrated : ALI
104 Stop running, in a way : CLOT
105 Words with motion or stone : SET IN …
106 ___-do-well : NE’ER
107 “Don’t Matter” singer, 2007 : AKON
108 Arduous journeys : TREKS
109 Issue featuring celebrity issues / Repeatedly : TABLOID MAGAZINE / TIME and AGAIN
112 “Bloody” English monarch : MARY I
113 “Gotcha” : I SEE
114 John known as the “Father of the National Parks” : MUIR
115 More adorable : CUTER
116 Fightin’ words : IT’S ON!
117 2012 Seth MacFarlane film with a 2015 sequel : TED
118 Vocal nudge : PSST!
119 Notification : ALERT

Down

1 Unyielding : RIGID
2 Feminist writer Jong : ERICA
3 Westminster competitor : PUREBRED DOG
4 Popular French periodical : ELLE
5 Article in a French periodical : LES
6 Stolen goods : SPOILS
7 Like yarn and old film : WOUND
8 Intermission follower, often : ACT II
9 Party person, informally : POL
10 Siddhartha Gautama by another name : BUDDHA
11 Like Nero Wolfe : OBESE
12 One getting out early : PAROLEE
13 California’s ___ Tree National Park : JOSHUA
14 Brown of the Food Network : ALTON
15 Donation center : BLOOD BANK
16 Paris-based carrier : AIR FRANCE
17 Tiny prop : TEE
20 “Pleeease?” : CAN’T I?
23 Impatient contraction : C’MON!
24 National birds of Germany, Egypt and Mexico : EAGLES
31 Stereotypical name for a female poodle : FIFI
32 Grannies : NANAS
33 Calculus calculation : AREA
34 It might end on a high note : YODEL
36 Lent a hand : AIDED
40 Sierra ___ : LEONE
41 TV monitor, in brief? : FCC
42 Glass of “This American Life” : IRA
43 Praise for a diva : BRAVA!
44 Tedious sort : BORE
45 Lettuce, in many a low-carb recipe : WRAP
46 Big jazz combo : NONET
47 It smooths the way : GREASE
48 Part of a goat or Africa : HORN
49 Weapon with a spring : EPEE
51 Behind, in slang : TUSHY
55 Lee who wrote “Go Set a Watchman” : HARPER
58 “Am I understood?” : Y’HEAR?
59 Grift : CON
60 Assert : STATE
63 What gerunds are formed from : VERBS
64 Not just bad : EVIL
65 “99 Luftballons” singer : NENA
66 Three sheets to the wind : HIGH AS A KITE
67 Gumbo vegetables : OKRAS
68 “Go, ___!” : TEAM
69 Continue : GO ON
71 Modern lead-in to -ade : HATER-
72 Coup group : CABAL
73 Many a 21st-century liberal : OBAMACRAT
74 PT Cruisers, e.g. : CHRYSLERS
76 Ohio site of the first Quaker Oats factory : AKRON
77 NorCal hub : SFO
78 Grassy surface : SOD
81 Go with the wind, in a way : SAIL
83 Where you hope to get a good deal : CASINO
84 Spots to relax : SPAS
87 “Fiddlesticks!” : BLAST IT!
91 Clicks “I agree,” maybe : OPTS IN
92 Where to let a sleeping dog lie : PET BED
93 Do some taxing work online? : E-FILE
94 Start of many a T-shirt slogan : I HEART …
95 Most of it is found underwater : BERG
97 Home of the world’s busiest train station (3.5 million daily commuters) : TOKYO
98 Come to an end : CEASE
99 River through Pakistan : INDUS
100 Many interstate vehicles : SEMIS
102 No party person : LONER
103 Like noble gases : INERT
107 Blue: Sp. : AZUL
108 “Am I oversharing?” : TMI?
110 Childish nuisance : IMP
111 Major health legislation of 2010, in brief : ACA

6 thoughts on “0312-23 NY Times Crossword 12 Mar 23, Sunday”

  1. 22:42, no errors. A nice theme (about which I have very little else to say).

    I did have a (possibly) amusing encounter with today’s (21×21) Universal crossword, though. It actually seemed a bit harder than either the NYT or the LAT and, when I finished, there was one clue (“Use the waving-hand emoji”) for which I got (from crosses) the answer “SAYHITO”. Now, I know that the word “emoji” comes from Japanese and I got the “HITO” part of the answer first, which made me think of various Japanese emperors (Hirohito, Akihito, and Naruhito), in all of which the “ito” is pronounced as “ee-toh”. I am too embarrassed to reveal how long it took me to finally see the answer as “SAY HI TO”.

    Maybe I’m doing too many crosswords … 😜.

  2. 30:09, no errors. Cute theme, which actually helped in solving the puzzle.
    @Bill: 10A Rockin’ Robin was released and charted in 1958. I couldn’t find any record of a rebound surge in sales (except for the Micheal Jackson cover) after that.
    Raising teenagers in the 1990’s meant that Steve URKEL and Family Matters was ‘must-see’ TV.

  3. 27:41. I got the circled part of the theme quickly, but it took me a while to even notice the shaded squares.

    You can’t see that the squares are shaded when you’re actually typing in that particular word so it escaped me for about 3/4 of the puzzle. Interestingly, the circles work by themselves in most cases – e.g. LOUD and CLEAR and CLEAR are pretty much the same thing.

    Never knew the origin of the word TEE. Interesting.

    Here’s where I usually go off on my annual rant against DST, but here we are again. My rants seem to have no effect.

    Best –

  4. 34:27, no errors. Pretty smooth and a typical Sunday for me. I’m still in Hawaii so it’s been pretty hit or miss…mostly miss.

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