0222-23 NY Times Crossword 22 Feb 23, Wednesday

Constructed by: Adam Wagner
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Onomatopoeia

Themed answers end with syllables that collectively sound like “ONOMATOPOEIA”:

  • 52A Word sounded out by the ends of 20-, 35- and 40-Across : ONOMATOPOEIA
  • 20A Region in South America that’s technically part of Europe : FRENCH GUIANA
  • 35A Greek city renowned for its olives : KALAMATA
  • 40A African country with its own 13-month calendar : ETHIOPIA

Bill’s time: 11m 38s

Bill’s errors: 2

WELP (pelp!)
WAH (pah)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

15 The “A” in A.D. : ANNO

The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

17 Diplomat : ENVOY

An envoy works at an embassy and is a representative of a government, and someone ranking below an ambassador. The name comes from the concept of the envoy being a “messenger” from his or her government. “Envoyer” is the French word for “to send”.

18 Tamagotchis are digital ones : PETS

Tamagotchis are hand-held digital pets from Japan. They come housed in tiny egg-shaped computers, usually with a three-button interface. The Tamagotchis can be named, get hungry, and can be happy or sad. Care is provided by the owner using the interface buttons. The name “Tamagotchi” comes from the Japanese word “tamago” meaning “egg”, melded with the English word “watch”.

20 Region in South America that’s technically part of Europe : FRENCH GUIANA

Guiana (often “French Guiana”) is an overseas department of France that is located on the northeast coast of South America. Guiana is home to the infamous Devil’s Island (Île du Diable) that France used as a penal colony for just over a century, up until 1953. The territory is also home to the Guiana Space Centre that is frequently used for launches by the European space industry.

23 Malia, to Sasha Obama, for short : SIS

Malia Obama is the eldest of Barack and Michelle Obama’s two daughters. She graduated from the private Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C., the same school that Chelsea Clinton attended. Malia took a gap year after leaving high school, and spent the 2016 summer as an intern in the US Embassy in Madrid, before heading off to Harvard in 2017.

Sasha is the younger of the two Obama children, having been born in 2001. She was the youngest child to reside in the White House since John F. Kennedy, Jr. moved in with his parents as a small infant. Sasha’s Secret Service codename is “Rosebud”, and her older sister Malia has the codename “Radiance”.

24 “Next time someone tells Bronx girls to take off their ___, they can just say they’re dressing like a congresswoman”: A.O.C. : HOOPS

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a politician who is often referred to by her initials “AOC”. A Democrat, she was first elected to the US House of Representatives in 2018, representing part of the Bronx, Queens and Rikers Island in New York City. When she took office in 2019 at the age of 29, AOC became the youngest woman ever to serve in Congress.

25 Saharan vipers : ASPS

The asp is a small to medium-sized snake, typically growing to between 18 and 30 inches in length. It has a distinctive triangular head and a dark, zigzag pattern along its back.

29 Southeast Asian noodle dish invented in a nationalist recipe contest : PAD THAI

The delicious dish called pad Thai is a meld of stir-fried rice noodles with tamarind juice, red chili pepper plus a mix of vegetables and possibly tofu, meat or fish. It is usually topped with crushed peanuts, coriander and lime. The name “pad Thai” translates as “fried Thai-style”.

35 Greek city renowned for its olives : KALAMATA

The kalamata olive is a large, dark purple, almond-shaped olive that is perhaps the most common table olive from Greece. It is named for the city of Kalamata in the southern Peloponnese, which is at the center of the region where the olive variety is grown. Even though the EU reserves the name “kalamata” for only those olives grown in the region, we can buy kalamata olives grown elsewhere, from California for example.

36 Brown University’s mascot Bruno, for one : BEAR

Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island is one of the eight Ivy League schools. Brown has been around a long time, founded in 1764, years before America declared independence from England. The university took the name of Brown in 1804 after one Nicholas Brown, Jr. gave a substantial gift to the school. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Brown Bears, and their mascot is Bruno.

40 African country with its own 13-month calendar : ETHIOPIA

Ethiopia follows a unique 13-month calendar, which is seven years and eight months behind the Gregorian calendar. The 13th month, called Pagume, has five or six days depending on whether it is a leap year or not. This calendar is based on the Julian calendar and is closely linked to the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, which follows its own religious festivals and traditions.

42 TV producer Chaiken : ILENE

Ilene Chaiken is the co-creator of the Showtime drama series “The L Word”. The show deals with lesbian, bisexual and transgender people living in West Hollywood. The title refers to “the L word”: lesbian.

46 Costa ___ : RICA

Costa Rica is a country in Central America that is bordered by Nicaragua to the north and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

52 Word sounded out by the ends of 20-, 35- and 40-Across : ONOMATOPOEIA

Onomatopoeia is the naming of something by vocally imitating the sound associated with it. Examples of onomatopoeia are “chirp”, “clash”, “click” and “hiccups”.

55 “So much for that!” : WELP!

“Welp” is a slang term used at the beginning of a sentence to indicate disappointment. “Welp” is used in the same way that we use the interjection “well”.

  • Well, that worked out.
  • Welp, that didn’t work out.
  • 58 “This register’s now open!” : NEXT!

    What we usually call a cash register here in North America, we mostly call a “till” in Ireland and the UK. I haven’t heard the word “till” used much here in that sense …

    59 Amy of “Arrival” : ADAMS

    Amy Adams is an American actress, although she was actually born in Vicenza, Italy while her father was a US serviceman stationed on an Italian base. My favorite Amy Adams film so far is the outstanding “Julie & Julia” in which she acted alongside Meryl Streep. I highly recommend this truly delightful movie.

    2016’s “Arrival” is a very entertaining sci-fi film that is based on a short story by Ted Chiang called “Story of Your Life”. Amy Adams plays a linguist who is called upon to communicate with aliens who have arrived on Earth.

    61 It’s bent while genuflecting : KNEE

    Our verb “to genuflect” means “to bend the knee, in worship”. The term comes to us via French from the Latin “genu” meaning “knee” and “flectere” meaning “to bend”.

    Down

    2 Painter Matisse : HENRI

    Henri Matisse was a French artist renowned for his contribution to modern art. In his early career, Matisse was classed as a “fauve”, one of the group of artists known as the “wild beasts” who emphasized strong color over realism in their works. He was a lifelong friend of Pablo Picasso, and the two were considered to be good-natured rivals so their works are often compared. One major difference between their individual portfolios is that Picasso tended to paint from his imagination, whereas Matisse tended to use nature as his inspiration.

    4 Musk of new cars? : ELON

    Elon Musk is a successful businessman who has founded or led some very high-profile companies, namely PayPal, Tesla Motors and SpaceX. Musk received a lot of publicity in early 2018 during a test launch by SpaceX of the Falcon Heavy launch vehicle. A Tesla Roadster belonging to Musk was carried into space as a dummy payload.

    6 Eminem song with a Guinness world record for “most words in a hit single” (1,560 in six minutes) : RAP GOD

    “Rap God” is a song by American rapper Eminem, released in 2013. “Rap God” holds the Guinness World Record for the most words in a hit single. The song contains a total of 1,560 words in just over six minutes, which translates to an average of 4.28 words per second.

    9 Activist Parks : ROSA

    Rosa Parks was one of some brave women in days gone by who refused to give up their seats on a bus to white women. It was the stand taken by Rosa Parks on December 1, 1955 that sparked the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. President Clinton presented Ms. Parks with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996. When she died in 2005, Rosa Parks became the first ever woman to have her body lie in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda.

    22 “De ___” (“You’re welcome,” in Spanish) : NADA

    “Nada” is the Spanish word for “nothing”. “De nada” translates literally from the Spanish as “of nothing”, and is used to mean “you’re welcome” or “don’t mention it”. The French have the same expression “de rien”, also translating to “of nothing” and used the same way.

    27 Lustrous fabric : SATIN

    The material known as “satin” takes its name from “Zayton”, the medieval Arabic name for the Chinese port city of Quanzhou. Quanzhou was used for the export of large amounts of silk to Europe.

    28 They help you see at sea : PERISCOPES

    The prefix “peri-” is Greek in origin and means “around”. An example of its use is “periscope”, a device on a submarine for looking “around”.

    30 Mont Blanc, for one : ALP

    Mont Blanc is the highest peak in the Alps. The name “Mont Blanc” translates from French into “white mountain”. The mountain lies on the border between France and Italy, and it has been generally accepted for decades that the summit lies within French territory. However, there have been official claims that the summit does in fact fall within the borders of Italy.

    34 “Chicago Hope” actress Christine : LAHTI

    Christine Lahti is an actress probably best known for playing Dr. Kate Austen on the TV medical drama “Chicago Hope”. If you read “The Huffington Post” you might run across her as well, as Lahti is a contributing blogger.

    35 Car company whose name roughly translates to “rising out of Asia” : KIA

    Kia Motors is the second-largest manufacturer of cars in South Korea, behind Hyundai (and Hyundai is a part owner in Kia now). Kia was founded in 1944 as a manufacturer of bicycle parts, and did indeed produce Korea’s first domestic bicycle. The company’s original name was Kyungsung Precision Industry, with the Kia name introduced in 1952.

    44 Like grapefruit or arugula : BITTER

    The somewhat bitter fruit that we know as “grapefruit” originated in the island nation of Barbados in the Caribbean. It developed as a hybrid (possibly accidentally) of the Jamaican sweet orange and the Indonesian pomelo. Back in the mid-1700s, the new hybrid was referred to as “the forbidden fruit”, and later as the shaddock. Some believe that a “Captain Shaddock” brought Indonesian pomelo seeds to Barbados and was responsible for developing the hybrid. The contemporary name is perhaps an allusion to the fact that grapefruit grow in clusters like grapes.

    Eruca sativa is an edible plant that is known as “arugula” in the US, and “rocket” in Britain and Ireland and in Canada. The Italian name for the plant is “rucola”, from the Latin name. It is “rucula” that evolved into the American term “arugula”.

    45 Teléfono greeting : ALO

    In Spanish, one might answer “el teléfono” (the telephone) with the word “Aló” (hello).

    50 Island shared by two countries : TIMOR

    Timor is an island in Maritime Southeast Asia. The island is politically divided into West Timor, belonging to Indonesia, and the independent state of East Timor. The name “Timor” comes from a Malay word for “east”, and is used as Timor lies at the eastern end of the Lesser Sunda Islands.

    53 Peeling potatoes, perhaps : ON KP

    The initialism “KP” is US military slang that stands for either “kitchen police” or “kitchen patrol”.

    54 Thor’s father : ODIN

    In Norse mythology, Thor was the son of Odin. Thor wielded a mighty hammer and was the god of thunder, lightning and storms. Our contemporary word “Thursday” comes from “Thor’s Day”.

    55 Half a trombone sound : WAH

    The so-called “sad trombone” sound is used a lot in game shows to indicate that a player is losing. It’s that plaintive “wah wah” sound.

    56 Horror director Roth : ELI

    Eli Roth is one of a group of directors of horror movies known quite graphically as “The Splat Pack”. I can’t stand “splat” movies and avoid them as best I can. Roth is also famous for playing Donny Donowitz in the Quentin Tarantino movie “Inglourious Basterds”, a good film I thought, if you close your eyes during the gruesome bits.

    57 Part of L.A. : LOS

    Mission San Gabriel Arcángel was founded by Spanish Franciscans led by Friar Junipero Serra in 1771. The mission, which continues running to this day, is located about 10 miles from today’s downtown LA. Forty-four settlers left Mission San Gabriel Arcángel in 1781 to found the pueblo named “El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula” (The Town of Our Lady the Queen of the Angels of the Porciúncula River”). It was this pueblo that grew into the city of Los Angeles.

    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1 Bird’s sound : CHEEP
    6 Lion’s sound : ROAR
    10 Dog’s sound : BARK
    14 Recovers : HEALS
    15 The “A” in A.D. : ANNO
    16 “I wish I had more thumbs to put up!,” e.g. : RAVE
    17 Diplomat : ENVOY
    18 Tamagotchis are digital ones : PETS
    19 “Don’t overdo it” : EASY!
    20 Region in South America that’s technically part of Europe : FRENCH GUIANA
    23 Malia, to Sasha Obama, for short : SIS
    24 “Next time someone tells Bronx girls to take off their ___, they can just say they’re dressing like a congresswoman”: A.O.C. : HOOPS
    25 Saharan vipers : ASPS
    28 Hang in the balance : PEND
    29 Southeast Asian noodle dish invented in a nationalist recipe contest : PAD THAI
    32 Stayed in neutral : IDLED
    35 Greek city renowned for its olives : KALAMATA
    36 Brown University’s mascot Bruno, for one : BEAR
    37 Be cheap, say : SKIMP
    39 “Really, though?” : IS IT?
    40 African country with its own 13-month calendar : ETHIOPIA
    42 TV producer Chaiken : ILENE
    43 Loses one’s temper : GETS MAD
    44 Refuse to proceed : BALK
    46 Costa ___ : RICA
    47 Unappetizing drink : SWILL
    49 Utmost : NTH
    52 Word sounded out by the ends of 20-, 35- and 40-Across : ONOMATOPOEIA
    55 “So much for that!” : WELP!
    58 “This register’s now open!” : NEXT!
    59 Amy of “Arrival” : ADAMS
    60 Burn soother : ALOE
    61 It’s bent while genuflecting : KNEE
    62 Hold off from publishing, as a scoop : SIT ON
    63 Snake’s sound : HISS
    64 Cat’s sound : PURR
    65 Pig’s sound : SNORT

    Down

    1 Ones who will give you a mouthful? : CHEFS
    2 Painter Matisse : HENRI
    3 Pronounced features of American Craftsman-style houses : EAVES
    4 Musk of new cars? : ELON
    5 Pumped : PSYCHED
    6 Eminem song with a Guinness world record for “most words in a hit single” (1,560 in six minutes) : RAP GOD
    7 Extra life, in video games : ONE-UP
    8 Like some email filters : ANTI-SPAM
    9 Activist Parks : ROSA
    10 Liquid that may be pumped : BREAST MILK
    11 Small battery : AAA
    12 Some music festival lodgings : RVS
    13 Shift or Enter : KEY
    21 Sweetie : HON
    22 “De ___” (“You’re welcome,” in Spanish) : NADA
    26 Terrible twos, e.g. : PHASE
    27 Lustrous fabric : SATIN
    28 They help you see at sea : PERISCOPES
    30 Mont Blanc, for one : ALP
    31 “Must be something ___” : I ATE
    32 “___ of you!” : I BEG
    33 Dissuade : DETER
    34 “Chicago Hope” actress Christine : LAHTI
    35 Car company whose name roughly translates to “rising out of Asia” : KIA
    37 There’s the rub! : SPA
    38 It might be printed on a placemat : KIDS MENU
    41 Arab nation that’s a top exporter of gypsum : OMAN
    42 “None for me, thanks” : I’LL PASS
    44 Like grapefruit or arugula : BITTER
    45 Teléfono greeting : ALO
    48 Salon specialist : WAXER
    49 “Swell!” : NEATO!
    50 Island shared by two countries : TIMOR
    51 “It ___ sunk in yet” : HASN’T
    53 Peeling potatoes, perhaps : ON KP
    54 Thor’s father : ODIN
    55 Half a trombone sound : WAH
    56 Horror director Roth : ELI
    57 Part of L.A. : LOS

    17 thoughts on “0222-23 NY Times Crossword 22 Feb 23, Wednesday”

    1. 10:02, no errors. Cleverly, the top and bottom rows are filled with examples of onomatopoeia. How cool is that?! I heartily approve … 😜

    2. 14:55, no errors. Biggest problems for me were spelling issues. Guyana? Guinea? GUIANA? Tried to spell KALAMATA like calamari. As for ONOMATOPOEIA, well let’s just fuhgettaboutit.

    3. 13:42 Completely botched the WAH/ELI/WELP universe.

      Everything I know about FRENCH GUIANA, I know from the movie “Papillon”.

      There are so many things wrong with digital PETS being so popular I don’t know where to begin. It would be a bit melodramatic to say it’s everything wrong in today’s world. However, a respectable argument could be made…

      Years ago I ate an an ETHIOPIAn restaurant in Philadelphia called Tangerines. They served everything family style. When I looked at everything in the menu, nothing sounded particularly appetizing (at all!) so I left the ordering to others at the table (there were 10 of us). I figured I’d hit a taco stand later.

      However, when I tried everything, it was all remarkably good. I was stunned and wanted to go back. That restaurant has since gone out of business. Too bad. But I’ve been a fan of that cuisine ever since.

      Best –

    4. @Jeff … I tell a similar story about an Ethiopian restaurant in Boulder (which is also, sadly, out of business now). My son, who was a teenager at the time, was a bit put off by the family-style aspect of it and by the extent to which we were expected to use our hands, so he asked the lovely lady who ran the place for some silverware. In response, she showed him how to use Ethiopian flatbread (“injera”, made of “teff”) for the purpose. She did this by wrapping up bits of the various dishes and feeding him the result. His teenage male ego did not … uh … cope … well. And the rest of us were quite amused, as I recall. (I’ll have to ask him if he remembers the event … 😜).

    5. 23:54 just me, just slow…Dave K, neat observation on the sound effects on the top and bottom rows, that makes two themes that I missed! :- )

    6. 37:17.
      3 squares in error. First letter of Welp , then instead of French Guiana, hoops and one up, I had French Gaiana, hood and one ad.

    7. 24:01 with 2 errors in 7D.
      6&7D and18&24A all the unknowns crammed in one spot…gee imagine that👎👎
      When have you or anyone you know ever used the term WELP?
      How many crossword fans are also rap fans?
      Stay safe😀

    8. Got everything correct. I came down to only WELP remaining. I just could not believe that the editors would use such a low-class slangy, Appalachian-derived word. I wrote it in anyway and and ended up with a perfect solve.

    9. welp…never heard it used either. But after years of doing crosswords I’m not surprised at some of the weird words puzzle makers find to fit their set ups.

    10. As a sidenote… Can someone explain to me AOC‘s comment about the hoops. I do not quite get the connection between hoops and the Bronx and Congress.

      1. I also didn’t understand that comment when I saw it in the puzzle five weeks ago; now that you reminded me of it, I consulted Dr. Google and found this:

        https://youtu.be/Fh14iyewosY

        AOC, who views herself as a girl from the Bronx, was making a feminist statement, saying, “Nobody’s going to tell me what is or is not appropriate attire in Congress!”

        And I say, “Good for her!” … 👍👍👍

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