0220-23 NY Times Crossword 20 Feb 23, Monday

Constructed by: Emily Carroll
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Fuse Boxes

Themed answers each comprise two words, both of which are types of BOXES:

  • 59A Electrical panels found in older homes … or what 18-, 24-, 35- and 53-Across do (regarding each half of each answer)? : FUSE BOXES
  • 18A Daytime television drama : SOAP OPERA (soapbox & opera box)
  • 24A Kitchen gadget for the health-conscious : JUICE PRESS (juice box & press box)
  • 35A Romantic prospect after swiping right : TINDER MATCH (tinderbox & matchbox)
  • 53A Stress ball, e.g. : SQUEEZE TOY (squeeze-box & toy box)

Bill’s time: 5m 42s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Nike, Nestlé or Nabisco : BRAND

Nike was founded in 1964 in Eugene, Oregon by entrepreneur Phil Knight and track-and-field coach Bill Bowerman as Blue Ribbon Sports (BRS). BRS started out by distributing athletic shoes made in Japan. The company started making its own shoes in 1971 and changed its name to Nike, after the Greek goddess of victory.

Nestlé is the world’s largest food company. It was founded in 1905 in Vevey, Switzerland where the company headquarters is to this day. Although the company came into being as the result of a merger, it retains the name of one of the co-founders, German confectioner Henri Nestlé. Henri Nestlé’s real breakthrough product was baby formula.

The National Biscuit Company was formed in 1898 with the merger of three existing bakery businesses. The company name today is “Nabisco”, an abbreviated form of “National Biscuit Company”.

17 Sinclair who wrote “Oil!” : UPTON

Upton Sinclair was a prolific American author, with almost 100 books to his name. Sinclair’s most famous work is probably “The Jungle”, a 1906 novel about the meatpacking industry. Revelations in “The Jungle” contributed to the Meat Inspection Act being passed by Congress a few months after the book was published. Sinclair also wrote “Oil”, published in 1927, which was the basis of the 2007 film “There Will Be Blood” that stars Daniel Day-Lewis.

18 Daytime television drama : SOAP OPERA (soapbox & opera box)

The original soap operas were radio dramas back in the fifties. Given the structure of society back then, the daytime broadcasts were aimed at women working in the home as housewives. For some reason the sponsors of those radio shows, and the television shows that followed, were soap manufacturers like Procter & Gamble, Colgate-Palmolive and Lever Brothers. And that’s how the “soap” opera got its name …

Back in the 1650s, a soapbox was just that, a wooden box for holding or transporting soap. Empty soapboxes were carried easily by a potential orator and used as a stand from which to deliver an address.

20 U.F.O. pilots, for short : ETS

One might speculate that an unidentified flying object (UFO) is flown by an extraterrestrial (ET).

21 Jazz duo? : ZEES

There is a duo of letters Z (zees) in the word “jazz”.

23 Protective molar layer : ENAMEL

The outer layer of our teeth is made from enamel. It covers the dentin layer, which supports the enamel.

Molars are grinding teeth. The term “molar” comes from the Latin “mola” meaning “millstone”.

27 Enthusiast’s mag : ZINE

A zine is a magazine. The term “zine” is often reserved for noncommercial publications, including those issued online.

28 Pigmented rings : AREOLAS

An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” (plural “areolae”) comes from Latin, meaning “small open space”, and is a diminutive of the Latin word “area”, meaning “open space”.

29 Calligrapher’s implement : PEN

Calligraphy is the art of fine handwriting. The term “calligraphy” comes from the Greek “kallos” meaning “beauty” and “graphein” meaning “to write”.

33 Fruits with pits : DATES

Date palms can be either male or female. Only the female tree bears fruit (called “dates”).

35 Romantic prospect after swiping right : TINDER MATCH (tinderbox & matchbox)

Tinder is a matchmaking app that uses Facebook profiles. Users “swipe” photos of potential matches, either to the right (“like”) or to the left (“not interested”). Users who “match” each other can then chat within the app.

47 Garland made with flowers : LEI

“Lei” is a Hawaiian word meaning “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a lei is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

48 Suffragist Elizabeth Cady ___ : STANTON

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of the earliest leaders of the women’s rights and women’s suffrage movements in the United States. Notably, she opposed the extension of voting rights to African-American men (the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments), even though she was an outspoken abolitionist. She believed that increasing the number of male voters in the country would just make it harder for women to get the vote.

53 Stress ball, e.g. : SQUEEZE TOY (squeeze-box & toy box)

The accordion (“squeeze-box”, colloquially) is a musical instrument related to the concertina. It is box-shaped and driven by a bellows that is compressed and expanded manually. The bellows force air across metal strips (called “reed”) that vibrate to produce sounds. Notes are selected by using a piano-style keyboard (in a piano accordion) or by pressing down buttons (in a button accordion).

55 Biblical book of sacred poems : PSALMS

The Greek word “psalmoi” originally meant “songs sung to a harp”, and gave us the word “psalms”. In the Jewish and Western Christian traditions, the Book of Psalms contains 150 individual psalms, divided into five sections.

57 “Et voilà!” : TA-DA!

The French word “voilà” means “there it is”, and “voici” means “here it is”. The terms come from “voi là” meaning “see there” and “voi ici” meaning “see here”.

59 Electrical panels found in older homes … or what 18-, 24-, 35- and 53-Across do (regarding each half of each answer)? : FUSE BOXES

Fuses include a metal component that melts when too much current passes through it, hence breaking the circuit.

67 Chaney of old horror films : LON

Lon Chaney, Sr. played a lot of crazed-looking characters in the days of silent movies. He did much of his own make-up work, developing the grotesque appearances that became his trademark, and earning himself the nickname “the man of a thousand faces”. Most famous were his portrayals of the title characters in the films “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” (1923) and “The Phantom of the Opera” (1925).

Down

1 Toronto M.L.B. player : BLUE JAY

The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

3 Most on edge : ANTSIEST

The word “antsy” embodies the concept of “having ants in one’s pants”, meaning being nervous and fidgety. However, “antsy” has been used in English since the 1830s, whereas “ants in the pants” originated a century later.

4 Sgt., e.g. : NCO

A non-commissioned officer (NCO) might be a sergeant (sgt.) or a corporal (cpl.).

5 Oscar-winning Washington : DENZEL

Denzel Washington is an actor from Mount Vernon, just outside New York City. Washington’s big break came with a TV role, playing Dr. Philip Chandler on “St. Elsewhere” from 1982 to 1988.

6 Unlikely philanthropists : MISERS

Philanthropy is a concern for human welfare, and the act of donating to persons or groups who support such concerns. The term “philanthropy” derives from the Greek “phil-” meaning “loving”, and “anthropos” meaning “mankind”.

8 Little legume : PEA

Plants called legumes are notable in that they work symbiotically with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, microorganisms found in the root nodules that convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonium ions. As nitrogen is an essential component of proteins, legumes are exceptionally rich sources of plant protein. Examples of legumes are peas, beans, lentils and peanuts.

10 Bolivian capital : LA PAZ

The administrative capital of Bolivia, La Paz, is officially named Nuestra Senora de La Paz (Our Lady of Peace). La Paz is the seat of the Bolivian government, even though the constitutional capital of the country is Sucre.

11 Result of iron deficiency : ANEMIA

The term “anemia” (or “anaemia”, as we write it back in Ireland) comes from a Greek word meaning “lack of blood”. Anemia is a lack of iron in the blood, or a low red blood cell count. Tiredness is a symptom of the condition, and so we use the term “anemic” figuratively to mean “lacking in vitality or substance”.

13 What kosher seafood has that nonkosher seafood does not : SCALES

According to Jewish dietary laws, kosher food is fit to eat, and food that is not fit to eat is referred to as treif (or “tref”). The usage of “kosher” has extended to include anything considered legitimate.

19 Bygone Spanish currency : PESETA

The peseta is a former currency of Spain and was also the de facto currency of Spain’s neighbor, the Principality of Andorra. The peseta was replaced by the euro in 2002.

22 Government grp. employing ecologists : EPA

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

25 “Doonesbury” or “Dilbert” : COMIC

When cartoonist Garry Trudeau was deciding on a name for his comic strip in 1970, he opted for “Doonesbury”. He combined “doone”, which is slang for a “genial fool”, and the last syllables in “Pillsbury”, the family name of Trudeau’s roommate while he was at Yale. Trudeau has been married to TV journalist Jane Pauley since 1980.

“Dilbert” is a comic strip drawn by Scott Adams, who used to be a “neighbor” of mine when I lived in the Bay Area. Adams used to be co-owner of a restaurant at the end of my street that had a menu replete with “Dilbertesque” comments.

26 Big name in canned meat : SPAM

Spam is a precooked meat product that is sold in cans. It was introduced by Hormel Foods in 1937. The main meat ingredients are pork shoulder meat and ham. The name “Spam” was chosen as the result of a competition at Hormel, with the winner earning himself a hundred dollars. According to the company, the derivation of the name “Spam” is a secret known by only a few former executives, but the speculation is that it stands for “spiced ham” or “shoulders of pork and ham”. Spam is particularly popular in Hawaii, so popular that it is sometimes referred to as “the Hawaiian steak”.

33 “Dr.” of hip-hop : DRE

“Dr. Dre” is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such as Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

38 Actor La Salle : ERIQ

Eriq La Salle played Dr. Peter Benton on “ER”, and is best known in film for his portrayal of Darryl in the 1998 comedy “Coming to America”.

39 Cocktail made with whiskey, honey and lemon : HOT TODDY

The word “toddy” has come a long way. Its origins lie in the Hindi word for a palm tree, which is “tar”. The derivative word “tari” was used for palm sap, which came into English as “tarrie”, then “taddy” and “toddy”, all of which described an alcoholic drink made from fermented palm sap. That was back around 1600. Late in the 18th century, the palm sap drink called “toddy” had morphed into meaning any alcoholic drink made with liquor, hot water, sugar and spices.

42 Dogs with standard, medium and miniature varieties : POODLES

The standard poodle breed of dog is considered by many to be the second-most intelligent breed, after the border collie. The name “poodle” comes from a Low German word meaning “to splash about”, reflecting the original use of the breed as a water retriever.

43 Big name in pretzels : SNYDER’S

Pretzels originated in Europe and are especially popular in Southern Germany where a pretzel is known as “Brezel”. Pretzels were introduced into the US in the 1800s by immigrants from Germany and Switzerland who came to be known over here as the Pennsylvania Dutch.

44 Pepto-Bismol dosage : CAPFUL

Pepto-Bismol was originally marketed as a remedy for infant diarrhea, and sold under the name “Bismosol: Mixture Cholera Infantum”.

45 Octopus antagonist in “The Little Mermaid” : URSULA

“The Little Mermaid” is a 1989 animated feature from Disney that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale of the same name. It tells the story of a mermaid princess named Ariel who falls in love with the human Prince Eric. Ariel’s father is chief merman King Triton. Her best friend is Flounder, who despite his name is not a flounder at all and is actually a tropical fish. Ariel is also friends with Sebastian, a red Jamaican crab whose full name is Horatio Thelonious Ignacious Crustaceous Sebastian.

49 Actor Danson : TED

Actor Ted Danson is noted in particular for three successful roles that he has played on television. He played Sam Malone on the sitcom “Cheers”, the title role on the sitcom “Becker”, and eventually led the cast on the drama series “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”. Danson has been married to actress Mary Steenburgen since 1995.

50 Flowering shrub : AZALEA

Azaleas are very toxic to most animals. If you go to Korea, you might come across “Tug Yonju”, which is azalea wine made from the plant’s blossoms. Azaleas are usually grown as shrubs, but are also seen as small trees, and often indoors.

52 On the ball : ALERT

The phrase “on the ball”, meaning “alert”, comes from ball sports. It is a contraction of the expression “keep your eye on the ball”, i.e. stay alert!

54 In ___ (not yet born) : UTERO

“In utero” is a Latin term meaning “in the uterus”. The Latin “uterus” (plural “uteri”) translates as both “womb” and “belly”. “Uterys” comes from the Greek “hystera” that also means “womb”, which gives us the words “hysterectomy”, and “hysterical”.

56 Wharton degs. : MBAS

Wharton is the business school of the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia. The school was established in 1881 largely due to a donation from industrialist Joseph Wharton, co-founder of Bethlehem Steel.

60 Gridiron group rebooted in 2020 : XFL

The XFL was an American Football league that only survived for one season. The intention of the league was to provide football fans with something to watch in the off-season, but the fans didn’t bother. There was discussion when the league was founded that “XFL” would stand for “Extreme” Football League, but the decision was made to let the “X” stand for nothing at all. The XFL was revived in 2020.

62 Edmonton’s province: Abbr. : ALB

Edmonton is the capital city of the Canadian province of Alberta. The city was founded as Fort Edmonton in 1795, with the name taken from the area in London called Edmonton. Edmonton, London was the home of pioneer John Peter Pruden who suggested the name. London’s Edmonton was also home for deputy governor Sir James Winter Lake of the Hudson’s Bay Company.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Nike, Nestlé or Nabisco : BRAND
6 Treasure seeker’s aid : MAP
9 Teacher’s responsibility : CLASS
14 Knight’s weapon : LANCE
15 Wrath : IRE
16 Frenzied : MANIC
17 Sinclair who wrote “Oil!” : UPTON
18 Daytime television drama : SOAP OPERA (soapbox & opera box)
20 U.F.O. pilots, for short : ETS
21 Jazz duo? : ZEES
23 Protective molar layer : ENAMEL
24 Kitchen gadget for the health-conscious : JUICE PRESS (juice box & press box)
27 Enthusiast’s mag : ZINE
28 Pigmented rings : AREOLAS
29 Calligrapher’s implement : PEN
31 Stubborn animal : ASS
32 Courteous contraction : YES’M
33 Fruits with pits : DATES
35 Romantic prospect after swiping right : TINDER MATCH (tinderbox & matchbox)
40 To-do list task : CHORE
41 Exclamation at the end of a trip? : OOPS!
44 Baby bear : CUB
47 Garland made with flowers : LEI
48 Suffragist Elizabeth Cady ___ : STANTON
51 Region : AREA
53 Stress ball, e.g. : SQUEEZE TOY (squeeze-box & toy box)
55 Biblical book of sacred poems : PSALMS
57 “Et voilà!” : TA-DA!
58 Unusual : ODD
59 Electrical panels found in older homes … or what 18-, 24-, 35- and 53-Across do (regarding each half of each answer)? : FUSE BOXES
61 Super-duper soup scooper : LADLE
63 Prefix meaning “very” : ULTRA-
64 To and ___ : FRO
65 Respected community leader : ELDER
66 Has staying power : LASTS
67 Chaney of old horror films : LON
68 Bottomless pit : ABYSS

Down

1 Toronto M.L.B. player : BLUE JAY
2 Pure bliss : RAPTURE
3 Most on edge : ANTSIEST
4 Sgt., e.g. : NCO
5 Oscar-winning Washington : DENZEL
6 Unlikely philanthropists : MISERS
7 Greeted the day, say : AROSE
8 Little legume : PEA
9 “Let’s go!” : C’MON!
10 Bolivian capital : LA PAZ
11 Result of iron deficiency : ANEMIA
12 Sounds from fire trucks : SIRENS
13 What kosher seafood has that nonkosher seafood does not : SCALES
19 Bygone Spanish currency : PESETA
22 Government grp. employing ecologists : EPA
25 “Doonesbury” or “Dilbert” : COMIC
26 Big name in canned meat : SPAM
30 Court divider : NET
33 “Dr.” of hip-hop : DRE
34 Pastry served with afternoon tea : SCONE
36 Rink org. : NHL
37 Childish rebuttal : DOES SO!
38 Actor La Salle : ERIQ
39 Cocktail made with whiskey, honey and lemon : HOT TODDY
42 Dogs with standard, medium and miniature varieties : POODLES
43 Big name in pretzels : SNYDER’S
44 Pepto-Bismol dosage : CAPFUL
45 Octopus antagonist in “The Little Mermaid” : URSULA
46 Wild animals : BEASTS
48 Add spices to : SEASON
49 Actor Danson : TED
50 Flowering shrub : AZALEA
52 On the ball : ALERT
54 In ___ (not yet born) : UTERO
56 Wharton degs. : MBAS
60 Gridiron group rebooted in 2020 : XFL
62 Edmonton’s province: Abbr. : ALB

5 thoughts on “0220-23 NY Times Crossword 20 Feb 23, Monday”

  1. 5:31. Decent theme for a Monday.

    Smooth solve except where I saw that the clue for PEA was “Little league” ?? Then I reread it….

    Best –

  2. 17:52, no errors. Got way out in the weeds today. Similar to Jeff, I misread 34D as ‘pasta’ instead of pastry. Should have recognized that FUSE PANEL couldn’t work in 59A since the word ‘panel’ was used in the clue.

  3. No errors.
    Never heard of a SNYDER pretzel.

    When I was little, we used to stick pennies in the fuse box. Dad started it. How dangerous was that.

    We also used to tape nickles to the needle head on our 45 record player so the record player wouldn’t skip.

    Ha! Those were the days.

    1. Try Snyder’s pretzels — good. Second only to Utz. This from a Pennsylvania girl — PA the home of pretzels in this country, thanks to the PA Dutch.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *