0530-21 NY Times Crossword 30 May 21, Sunday

Constructed by: Adam Wagner
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme Game Over

Themed answers are in the down-direction, and include a KING that has been “TIPPED OVER” into the across-direction:

  • 47D One ending for a classic board game – another of which (when a player resigns) is represented visually six times in this puzzle : CHECKMATE
  • 26A King of a nursery rhyme : COLE
  • 4D Quick to fall asleep, in a way : NARCOLEPTIC
  • 55A King of ancient Israel : DAVID
  • 22D Spent some time on YouTube, say : WATCHED A VIDEO
  • 69A King of ancient Egypt : TUT
  • 28D Nobel Peace Prize recipient who wrote “No Future Without Forgiveness” : DESMOND TUTU
  • 78A King of myth : MIDAS
  • 67D Quintessentially cowardly : TIMID AS A MOUSE
  • 98A King of Shakespeare : LEAR
  • 76D Tinker (with) : FIDDLE AROUND
  • 118A King of Skull Island : KONG
  • 106D Potato cultivar that was developed in Ontario, despite its name : YUKON GOLD

Bill’s time: 18m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Gilda of the original “S.N.L.” cast : RADNER

Gilda Radner was a comedian and actress, and one of the original cast members of the hit television show “Saturday Night Live”. Radner left her first husband to marry comedic actor Gene Wilder, whom she met while they were both filming the Sidney Poitier movie “Hanky Panky”.

7 They may need to be cut off : SOTS

Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning “fool”. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s. The derivative term “besotted” means “muddled with drunkenness”, or more figuratively “infatuated”.

16 Degree in design, for short : BFA

The degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) is primarily designed for students intent on pursuing a career in the visual or performing arts.

19 Cow’s-milk cheese that’s often grated : ASIAGO

Asiago is a crumbly cheese that is named for the region in northeastern Italy from where it originates.

20 Sweet 16 org. : NCAA

In the NCAA Division I Basketball Championship, the teams remaining at various stages of the tournament are known as:

  • The “Sweet Sixteen” (the regional semi-finalists)
  • The “Elite Eight” (the regional finalists)
  • The “Final Four” (the national semi-finalists)

21 Honor named for a Greek goddess : CLIO AWARD

The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

23 Site of a lighthouse that was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World : PHAROS

The Lighthouse of Alexandria was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Built in the 3rd century BCE, the structure survived for centuries, until finally succumbing to an earthquake in 1323. The lighthouse was built on a small island in the Nile Delta called Pharos, and so the lighthouse is sometimes referred to as “Pharos of Alexandria”. It was about 400-450 feet in height, and the light was produced by a furnace at the top of the tower.

25 Where snow leopards and blue sheep roam : HIMALAYAS

The magnificent Himalaya range of mountains in Asia takes its name from the Sanskrit for “abode of snow”. Geographically, the Himalaya separates the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau to the north.

26 King of a nursery rhyme : COLE

Old King Cole was a merry old soul
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl
And he called for his fiddlers three.
Every fiddler he had a fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he;
Oh there’s none so rare, as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.

30 Test versions : BETAS

In the world of software development, the first tested issue of a new program is usually called the alpha version. Expected to have a lot of bugs that need to be fixed, the alpha release is usually distributed to a small number of testers. After reported bugs have been eliminated, the refined version is called a beta and is released to a wider audience, but with the program clearly labeled as “beta”. The users generally check functionality and report further bugs that are encountered. The beta version feeds into a release candidate, the version that is tested just prior to the software being sold into the market, hopefully bug-free.

35 Theater curtain material : SCRIM

“Scrim” is the name given to that transparent fabric that hangs down onto a theater’s stage. It is often used with special lighting for various effects.

40 Money of the Philippines : PESOS

The writing on bank notes in the Philippines used to be in English, so the national currency was recorded as the “peso”. Since 1967 the language on the notes has been Filipino, and now the name of the currency is written as “piso”.

43 One giving a khutbah sermon : IMAM

An imam is a Muslim leader, and often the person in charge of a mosque and/or perhaps a Muslim community.

46 Smaller alternative to a Quarter Pounder : MAC JR

The Quarter Pounder sandwich was created just down the road here, in a McDonald’s restaurant in Fremont, California. The franchise owner felt that there was a market for a hamburger with more meat in the bun, and so introduced a meat patty that weighed a quarter pound prior to cooking. He advertised the Quarter Pounder in his restaurant using the slogan, “Today Fremont, tomorrow the world”. Prophetic words …

48 Chicago team, in old “S.N.L.” sketches : DA BEARS

The Chicago Bears were founded in Decatur, Illinois in 1919 and moved to Chicago in 1921. The Bears are one of only two franchises in the NFL that were around at the time of the NFL’s founding (the other being the Arizona Cardinals, also based in Chicago in 1921).

50 Ski lodge mugful : HOT COCOA

The beverages hot cocoa and hot chocolate differ from each other in that the latter contains cocoa butter, whereas the former does not.

54 Fraternity letter : RHO

Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”, although it is equivalent to the Roman letter R.

56 Comic actress Gasteyer : ANA

Ana Gasteyer is an actress best known for being a cast member of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) from 1996 to 2002. Gasteyer was famous on SNL for playing Martha Stewart … topless!

60 Great Lakes nation : ONEIDA

The Oneida people originally lived in the area that is now Central New York. The Oneida were one of the five founding nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, also known as the Five Nations (the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca).

64 Pickup line? : RAM

Chrysler put ram hood ornaments on all of its Dodge-branded vehicles starting in 1933. When the first line of Dodge trucks and vans were introduced in 1981, they were named “Rams” in honor of that hood ornament.

65 Like the columns of the Lincoln Memorial : DORIC

The Doric was one of the three classical orders of architecture, the others being the Corinthian and the Ionic. The Doric was the earliest of the three orders, and the simplest.

The Lincoln Memorial is my favorite place to visit in the whole of Washington D.C. The memorial itself was designed by Henry Bacon, and the sculptor of the magnificent statue of President Lincoln was Daniel Chester French. I spent a wonderful afternoon a few years ago touring the workshop and home of French, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. The workshop is stunning, with miniature studies for his magnum opus, the Lincoln Statue, as well as many other beautiful works.

69 King of ancient Egypt : TUT

“King Tut” is a name commonly used for the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun. Tutankhamun may not have been the most significant of the pharaohs historically, but he is the most famous today largely because of the discovery of his nearly intact tomb in 1922 by Howard Carter. Prior to this find, any Egyptian tombs uncovered by archaeologists had been ravaged by grave robbers. Tutankhamun’s magnificent burial mask is one of the most recognizable of all Egyptian artifacts.

73 Org. with a complex code : IRS

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

74 “Happy Days” network : ABC

The fabulous sitcom “Happy Days” originally ran for 11 seasons, from 1974 to 1984. That makes it the second longest-running sitcom in the history of ABC (behind “The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet”). “Happy Days’ spawned several spin-off shows, two of which became very successful. Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams played two characters who later featured in “Laverne and Shirley”, and Robin Williams first played Mork from Ork on a “Happy Days” episode, which led to “Mork & Mindy”.

78 King of myth : MIDAS

King Midas of Greek mythology might be termed an alchemist as he had the power to turn everything he touched into gold i.e. the Midas touch. That power became a curse, as everything he touched turned to gold, including his food and drink, and even his children.

80 4G letters : LTE

In the world of telecommunications, the initialism LTE stands for Long-Term Evolution, and is wireless broadband communication standard. In general terms, LTE improves broadband speeds. As I understand it, LTE technology allows a 3G network to perform almost as well as a true 4G network, and so LTE is sometimes marketed as 4G LTE, even though it’s really “3G plus”.

86 F-, e.g. : ION

Here is a list of all the single-letter element symbols:

  • B = boron
  • C = carbon
  • F = fluorine
  • H = hydrogen
  • I = Iodine
  • K = potassium
  • N = nitrogen
  • O = oxygen
  • P = phosphorus
  • S = sulfur
  • U = uranium
  • V = vanadium
  • W = tungsten
  • Y = yttrium

89 Waze way: Abbr. : RTE

Waze is a navigation app that is similar to Google Maps and Apple Maps. Waze was developed in Israel, and was acquired by Google in 2013.

90 Piece of plastic with a gladiator pictured on it : AMEX CARD

“Amex” is short for “American Express”, the name of the financial services company that is best known for its credit card, charge card and traveler’s check businesses. The company name is indicative of its original business. American Express was founded in 1850 in Buffalo, New York as an express mail service.

95 ___-Briggs Type Indicator (popular personality test) : MYERS

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was created in 1962, by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers. The MBTI has been a popular tool used by businesses and business consultants for decades. The MBTI is built on the theories of Carl Jung and is designed to assess an individual’s personality type and give insight into how that individual interacts with other personality types.

97 “I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure,” e.g. : OATH

The Hippocratic Corpus is a collection of about 70 medical works that were at one time believed to have been written by the Ancient Greek physician Hippocrates, although authorship has been called into question. Within the collection is a document known as the Hippocratic Oath (but again, the authorship has been questioned). The oath is still used today as the basis for oaths taken by medical graduates before they enter into medical practice.

98 King of Shakespeare : LEAR

Shakespeare was inspired to write his famous drama “King Lear” by the legend of “Leir of Britain”, the story of a mythological Celtic king.

99 “Keep Austin ___” (city slogan) : WEIRD

Austin is the capital of the state of Texas. When the area was chosen to be the capital of the Republic of Texas, it was known as Waterloo. The name was changed in honor of Stephen F. Austin, a native of Virginia who was raised in Missouri and led the first successful colonization of Texas.

101 Annual presidential address, for short : SOTU

The US President’s State of the Union (SOTU) address is a requirement called out in Article II of the Constitution. George Washington gave the first address before a joint session of Congress in 1790. Thomas Jefferson discontinued the practice of making a personal address by sending Congress a written document that was then read out by a clerk. In 1913, Woodrow Wilson re-established the custom of delivering the message personally, there have been occasions since then when a written address has had to suffice, the last occasion being in 1981 when Jimmy Carter was in office.

109 “Bon appétit!” : ENJOY!

The phrase “Enjoy your meal” translates into French as “Bon appétit”, and into German as “Guten Appetit”.

111 Christ, to Bach : JESU

The Bach cantata “Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben” (Heart and Mouth and Deed and Life) has ten movements. The most famous of these movements is the last one, a chorale titled “Jesus bleibet meine Freude”, usually translated as “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring”.

114 Chimney channels : FLUES

The flue in a chimney is a duct that conveys exhaust gases from a fire to the outdoors. An important feature of a flue is that its opening is adjustable. When starting a fire, the flue should be wide open, maximizing airflow to get help ignition.

116 Warning on presents stashed in the closet : DO NOT OPEN!

In Old French a “clos” was an enclosure, with the diminutive form “closet” describing a small enclosure or private room. Over time this evolved into our modern usage of “closet”, describing a cabinet or cupboard.

118 King of Skull Island : KONG

The fictional Skull Island is home to King Kong in most of the movies featuring the giant gorilla. Kong has also been found on Farou Island (in “King Kong vs. Godzilla”) and Mondo Island (in “King Kong Escapes”). Skull Island is said to be located off the coast of Sumatra, Indonesia.

121 Actress Elisabeth : SHUE

Elisabeth Shue has always been a favorite actress of mine. She has been in several popular films including “The Karate Kid”, “Cocktail”, two of the “Back to the Future” movies, “Leaving Las Vegas”, and my personal favorite “Adventures in Babysitting”. More recently, Shue had a recurring role on the TV crime drama “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”.

128 Toys with much assembly required : LEGOS

Lego is manufactured by the Lego Group, a privately held company headquartered in Billund, Denmark. The company was founded by a carpenter called Ole Kirk Christiansen in 1934 and the now-famous plastic interlocking blocks were introduced in 1949. The blocks were originally sold under the name “Automatic Binding Bricks” but I think “Lego” is easier to remember! The name “Lego” comes from the Danish term “leg godt” meaning “play well”.

Down

1 Some hip-hop collectibles : RAP CDS

The compact disc (CD) was developed jointly by Philips and Sony as a medium for storing and playing sound recordings. When the first commercial CD was introduced back in 1982, a CD’s storage capacity was far greater than the amount of data that could be stored on the hard drive of personal computers available at that time.

4 Quick to fall asleep, in a way : NARCOLEPTIC

Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder in which the sufferer is drowsy during the day and experiences sudden needs for sleep. The term “narcolepsy” comes from the Greek words “narke” (numbness, stupor) and “lepsis” (seizure, attack).

6 Día de San Valentín gifts : ROSAS

In Spanish, a gift of “rosas” (roses) might be given on the “14 de febrero” (14th of February).

Saint Valentine’s Day was introduced by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saint’s day was dropped by the Roman Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

8 Tabloid nickname for mother Nadya Suleman : OCTOMOM

“Octomom” is a nickname that the media gave to Nadya Doud-Suleman Gutierrez. There was a lot of controversy surrounding the birth of Suleman’s octuplets in 2009, which were conceived with the aid of in vitro fertilization. She already had six children and was unemployed and availing of public assistance programs.

9 Powder in the powder room : TALC

Talc is a mineral, hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

10 Course with greens : SALAD

Our word “salad” comes from the Latin “salare” meaning “to salt”. The Latin “herba salata” translates as “salted vegetables”, which I guess could be a salad …

11 Machiavellian sort : SCHEMER

Niccolo Machiavelli’s political treatise entitled “The Prince”, and the philosophical opinions expressed therein, gave rise to the term “Machiavellian” meaning “cunning and devious”, especially at the level of state politics. Indeed, it is said that the reception of Machiavelli’s work was such that he lent his name “Niccolo” to the language as the derivation of the term “Old Nick”, meaning “the Devil”,

12 Omits : ELIDES

To elide is to pass over, omit or slur a syllable when speaking.

14 Gateway city to Utah’s Arches National Park : MOAB

Moab is a city in eastern Utah that attracts a lot of visitors each year, mainly those heading for Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, which are nearby.

The gorgeous Arches National Park is located in eastern Utah, just outside of Moab. The main focus of the park is the preservation of over 2,000 natural sandstone arches. The arches are relatively fragile, and 43 have collapsed since 1970, mainly due to erosion caused by wind and rain.

16 Home to about one in five Californians : BAY AREA

The San Francisco Bay Area comprises the nine counties that impinge on the San Francisco Bay itself: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano and Sonoma. The region also includes the major cities of San Jose, San Francisco and Oakland.

17 Long-running sitcom set in Seattle : FRASIER

“Frasier” is a very successful sitcom that originally ran for eleven seasons, from 1993 to 2004. Kelsey Grammer plays the title character, psychiatrist Frasier Crane. The show is a spinoff of the equally successful sitcom “Cheers” that ended its original run just a few months before “Frasier” premiered. By the time “Frasier” aired its last show, Grammer’s portrayal of Crane tied the record for the longest-running character on primetime TV. As an aside, that tie was with James Arness’ portrayal of Matt Dillon on “Gunsmoke”. As a further aside, the record was later broken by Richard Belzer’s portrayal of Detective John Munch on the shows “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “Law & Order: SVU”.

22 Spent some time on YouTube, say : WATCHED A VIDEO

YouTube is a video-sharing website that was launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion, less than two years after it was founded …

28 Nobel Peace Prize recipient who wrote “No Future Without Forgiveness” : DESMOND TUTU

Desmond Tutu is a South African, a former Anglican bishop who is an outspoken opponent of apartheid. Tutu won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009, among other distinguished awards.

39 City about 25 miles SE of Chicago, IL : GARY, IN

The city of Gary, Indiana is located just 25 miles from downtown Chicago and falls within the Chicago metropolitan area (also known as “Chicagoland”). Gary was founded by US Steel in 1906, as the company selected it as the site for a new steel plant. The name “Gary” was chosen in honor of Elbert H. Gary, who was the key player in setting up US Steel in 1901.

41 ___-faire (social adeptness) : SAVOIR

“Savoir-faire” is a French term that literally means “to know (how) to do”. There’s a similar term in French that we haven’t absorbed into English, i.e. “savoir-vivre” meaning “to know how to live”. “Savoir-vivre” describes the ability to acquit oneself well in the world, in society.

47 One ending for a classic board game – another of which (when a player resigns) is represented visually six times in this puzzle : CHECKMATE

In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be “in check”. If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in “checkmate” and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce “check!”) so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn’t occur.

52 Mowry who starred alongside her twin Tia in the ’90s sitcom “Sister, Sister” : TAMERA

“Sister, Sister” is a sitcom that originally aired from 11994 to 1999 starring identical twin sisters Tia and Tamera Mowry. Tia and Tamera play two sisters who were separated at birth, one being adopted by a single mother, and the other by a single father. The sisters happen upon each other 14 years later, and hilarity ensues …

58 Wilson who wrote the lyrics to 75-Across : BRIAN
(75A Beach Boys song set to the tune of Chuck Berry’s “Sweet Little Sixteen” : SURFIN’ USA)

Brian Wilson is mainly known as the leader and the main songwriter for the Beach Boys. Wildly successful, Wilson fell foul to drug abuse in the seventies, as well as mental illness. Wilson’s life story was the subject of the excellent 2014 biopic “Love & Mercy”.

67 Quintessentially cowardly : TIMID AS A MOUSE

In ancient Greece, Aristotle believed that there was a fifth element, beyond the accepted four elements of earth, wind, fire and water. This fifth element he called aether, postulating it was the makeup of celestial bodies. In Middle French in the 14th century, the “fifth element” was called “quinte essence”, coming into English as “quintessence” in the early 15th century. In the late 1500s, “quintessence” came to mean “purest essence” in a more general sense, with “quintessential” meaning “at it’s finest”.

69 Mosaic maker : TILER

In the Middle Ages, mosaics were often dedicated to the Muses. The term “mosaic” translates as “of the Muses”.

72 Ducks known for their soft down feathers : EIDERS

Eiders are large sea ducks. Their down feathers are used to fill pillows and quilts, giving the name to the quilt called an “eiderdown”.

84 Samosa tidbit : PEA

A samosa is quite a tasty appetizer. It is usually a triangular-shaped savory that often has a vegetarian filling. The word “samosa” is primarily used on Indian menus, and the name comes from “sanbosag”, the name for the dish in Persia.

88 Tool for a duel : EPEE

The French word for sword is “épée”. In competitive fencing the épée is connected to a system that records an electrical signal when legal contact is made on an opponent’s body.

91 Sidewalk drawings : CHALK ART

Back in Ireland, the “pavement” is what we call the “sidewalk, footpath” (because the footpath is “paved”, often with “paving” stones!). It’s very confusing when you arrive in this country from Ireland, and a little dangerous when one has been taught from a young age to “walk on the pavement” …

92 One of the Manning brothers : ELI

Eli Manning is a retired footballer who played quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning retired from football as the quarterback for the Denver Broncos in 2015. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback. Eli, Peyton and Archie co-authored a book for children titled “Family Huddle” in 2009. It describes the Mannings playing football together as young boys.

95 Breakout 1993 single for Counting Crows : MR JONES

Counting Crows is a band that formed in 1991 in Berkeley, California. The band’s name comes from a nursery rhyme that actually describes the counting of magpies. It’s not so common on this side of the Atlantic, but most British and Irish people are familiar with:

One for sorrow,
Two for joy,
Three for a girl,
Four for a boy,
Five for silver,
Six for gold,
Seven for a secret,
Never to be told.
Eight for a wish,
Nine for a kiss,
Ten for a bird,
You must not miss.

100 Only color of the rainbow not seen on the L.G.B.T. pride flag : INDIGO

The name of the color “indigo” ultimately comes from the Greek “indikon” meaning “blue dye from India”.

The best-known rainbow flag is the one representing gay pride. Such usage of the rainbow flag was popularized in 1978 by artist Gilbert Baker. The varying colors of the flag represent the diversity of the gay community.

102 Portable dwellings : TEPEES

A tepee (also written as “tipi” and “teepee”) is a cone-shaped tent traditionally made from animal hides that is used by the Great Plains Native Americans. A wigwam is a completely different structure and is often a misnomer for a tepee. A wigwam is a domed structure built by Native Americans in the West and Southwest, intended to be a more permanent dwelling. The wigwam can also be covered with hides but more often was covered with grass, reeds, brush or cloth.

104 Richie with the #1 hit “All Night Long” : LIONEL

Singer-songwriter Lionel Richie got his big break as a singer and saxophonist with the Commodores starting in 1968. Richie launched a very successful solo career in 1982. Richie is the father of socialite Nicole Richie, childhood friend of Paris Hilton and co-star on the Fox show “The Simple Life”.

“All Night Long (All Night)” is a 1983 single written and recorded by Lionel Richie. One of the more celebrated performances of the song by Richie was during the closing ceremony of 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

106 Potato cultivar that was developed in Ontario, despite its name : YUKON GOLD

Canada’s federal territory known as Yukon takes its name from the Yukon River. “Yukon” means “Big Stream” in the local Gwich’in language.

110 Nintendo dino : YOSHI

Yoshi is a dinosaur-like character in some Nintendo video games. Yoshi first appeared as a sidekick to Mario and Luigi in the 1991 game called “Super Mario World”.

119 “Oh, and another thing …,” for short : BTW …

By the way (BTW)

120 Graffiti signature : TAG

A tag is a particular type of graffiti. A tag usually isn’t a picture, but rather words that include the author’s name.

123 College, to a Brit : UNI

In Australia (Down Under), and in Britain and Ireland, the term “uni” is used routinely for “university”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Gilda of the original “S.N.L.” cast : RADNER
7 They may need to be cut off : SOTS
11 Ways of making ends meet? : SEAMS
16 Degree in design, for short : BFA
19 Cow’s-milk cheese that’s often grated : ASIAGO
20 Sweet 16 org. : NCAA
21 Honor named for a Greek goddess : CLIO AWARD
23 Site of a lighthouse that was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World : PHAROS
24 “___ pass” : IT’LL
25 Where snow leopards and blue sheep roam : HIMALAYAS
26 King of a nursery rhyme : COLE
27 Went to bat (for) : ADVOCATED
30 Test versions : BETAS
31 Good fashion sense, in modern slang : DRIP
32 Appear : SEEM
33 Features of some indoor arenas : DOMES
35 Theater curtain material : SCRIM
37 Fired off, say : SENT
38 Grind : SLOG
40 Money of the Philippines : PESOS
42 Follow : HEED
43 One giving a khutbah sermon : IMAM
46 Smaller alternative to a Quarter Pounder : MAC JR
48 Chicago team, in old “S.N.L.” sketches : DA BEARS
50 Ski lodge mugful : HOT COCOA
54 Fraternity letter : RHO
55 King of ancient Israel : DAVID
56 Comic actress Gasteyer : ANA
57 Left, cutesily : WENT BYE-BYE
60 Great Lakes nation : ONEIDA
64 Pickup line? : RAM
65 Like the columns of the Lincoln Memorial : DORIC
66 Cures : ANTIDOTES
68 “___ we good?” : ARE
69 King of ancient Egypt : TUT
71 Tattoo artist, so to speak : INKER
73 Org. with a complex code : IRS
74 “Happy Days” network : ABC
75 Beach Boys song set to the tune of Chuck Berry’s “Sweet Little Sixteen” : SURFIN’ USA
78 King of myth : MIDAS
80 4G letters : LTE
81 ___ pace : SNAIL’S
82 Not doing so hot : IN BAD SHAPE
86 F-, e.g. : ION
87 Discourage : DETER
89 Waze way: Abbr. : RTE
90 Piece of plastic with a gladiator pictured on it : AMEX CARD
92 Physics demonstration often done from the roof of a school : EGG DROP
95 ___-Briggs Type Indicator (popular personality test) : MYERS
97 “I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure,” e.g. : OATH
98 King of Shakespeare : LEAR
99 “Keep Austin ___” (city slogan) : WEIRD
101 Annual presidential address, for short : SOTU
103 Partner : ALLY
107 “No worries” : IT’S OK
109 “Bon appétit!” : ENJOY!
111 Christ, to Bach : JESU
113 Place : LIEU
114 Chimney channels : FLUES
116 Warning on presents stashed in the closet : DO NOT OPEN!
118 King of Skull Island : KONG
119 “Huddle up!” : BRING IT IN!
121 Actress Elisabeth : SHUE
122 When: Sp. : CUANDO
124 Early adolescent years, so to speak : TENDER AGE
125 Engage : HIRE
126 Opposite of wind up : UNREEL
127 Infinitesimal : WEE
128 Toys with much assembly required : LEGOS
129 Travel brochure listings : INNS
130 Named : TITLED

Down

1 Some hip-hop collectibles : RAP CDS
2 On dry land : ASHORE
3 Join a conference call, say : DIAL IN
4 Quick to fall asleep, in a way : NARCOLEPTIC
5 Sense of self : EGO
6 Día de San Valentín gifts : ROSAS
7 Tearfully complain : SNIVEL
8 Tabloid nickname for mother Nadya Suleman : OCTOMOM
9 Powder in the powder room : TALC
10 Course with greens : SALAD
11 Machiavellian sort : SCHEMER
12 Omits : ELIDES
13 Objective : AIM
14 Gateway city to Utah’s Arches National Park : MOAB
15 Some after-Christmas announcements : SALES
16 Home to about one in five Californians : BAY AREA
17 Long-running sitcom set in Seattle : FRASIER
18 Them’s the breaks! : ADS
22 Spent some time on YouTube, say : WATCHED A VIDEO
28 Nobel Peace Prize recipient who wrote “No Future Without Forgiveness” : DESMOND TUTU
29 Sought-after position : TOP JOB
34 Pop : SODA
36 G.P.s, e.g. : MDS
39 City about 25 miles SE of Chicago, IL : GARY, IN
41 ___-faire (social adeptness) : SAVOIR
44 Level the playing field? : MOW
45 Put one past : ACE
47 One ending for a classic board game – another of which (when a player resigns) is represented visually six times in this puzzle : CHECKMATE
49 Tough spots : BINDS
50 Bother incessantly : HARASS
51 Scoring win after win : ON A RUN
52 Mowry who starred alongside her twin Tia in the ’90s sitcom “Sister, Sister” : TAMERA
53 ___ Z : A TO
55 Cubs’ place to play home games : DEN
58 Wilson who wrote the lyrics to 75-Across : BRIAN
59 Play areas : YARDS
61 The “Bel Paese,” to locals : ITALIA
62 Borrower : DEBTOR
63 Scale : ASCEND
67 Quintessentially cowardly : TIMID AS A MOUSE
69 Mosaic maker : TILER
70 Remove from under the seat in front of you, say : UNSTOW
72 Ducks known for their soft down feathers : EIDERS
76 Tinker (with) : FIDDLE AROUND
77 Yes or no follower : … SIR
79 “I’ve got it!” : AHA!
83 Rob ___, British comedian and TV personality : BRYDON
84 Samosa tidbit : PEA
85 Part of an office phone no. : EXT
88 Tool for a duel : EPEE
91 Sidewalk drawings : CHALK ART
92 One of the Manning brothers : ELI
93 Disentangle oneself : GET FREE
94 Main source of energy? : GAS LINE
95 Breakout 1993 single for Counting Crows : MR JONES
96 Stay awhile : SOJOURN
100 Only color of the rainbow not seen on the L.G.B.T. pride flag : INDIGO
102 Portable dwellings : TEPEES
104 Richie with the #1 hit “All Night Long” : LIONEL
105 Borrower : LENDEE
106 Potato cultivar that was developed in Ontario, despite its name : YUKON GOLD
108 Pelvic exercise : KEGEL
110 Nintendo dino : YOSHI
112 Like diamonds from a mine : UNCUT
115 Father : SIRE
117 Weak, as a case : THIN
119 “Oh, and another thing …,” for short : BTW …
120 Graffiti signature : TAG
123 College, to a Brit : UNI

9 thoughts on “0530-21 NY Times Crossword 30 May 21, Sunday”

  1. 15:27. I got the theme on King TUT, because I knew that 28D had to be DESMOND TUTU (since I had the DESM part). Guess I’d have to play more chess (than the none that I currently play) to better appreciate the tipped over king aspect.

  2. 23:12. I got the Kings fairly easily, but only when I figured out 106D (being a potato lover) did I stumble upon the scheme for the puzzle. It went quickly after that.

  3. Another of those times when I spent as much time looking for an error as I spent doing the puzzle. I swear I remember putting in the second “I” of “DIAL IN” (or trying to, anyway), but, somehow, it became an “O”. Then, as someone with no fashion sense whatsoever (modern or otherwise 😜), “DROP” looked every bit as good as “DRIP”, and, somehow, “DIAL ON” remained completely invisible. I’d go back to doing the NYT puzzles on paper, but I’ve got a 1001-day streak going! How can I possibly give that up??! … 😜

  4. Slow morning for me. Raced through the first half, then ground to a halt. Got all the kings and the gimmick, but still…47:37 and glad to avoid “lookups.”🙈

  5. Over two hours and several look ups but ended up with no errors…I don’t get the explanation for 86A?
    Stay safe😀

    1. If the clue printed correctly in your paper, it should be:
      F- , e.g. (the minus sign should be superscripted).
      The F- represents an atom of Fluorine (F) which has picked up an extra electron making it an ION with a charge of -1.

  6. 43:23, no errors. Caught the first part of the theme fairly early, and filled the shaded blocks with the names of kings. Wasn’t until near the end that I saw the connection with the vertical entries.

  7. Got the theme early.. didn’t get the “tipped over” aspect. Cute.

    Messed up on 122A CUANDO. and 125D UNI, I had RNI for 125D.. didn’t know either one.

    Sundays have so many entries , there’s bound to be some “guffaws” and this one was no different.. DRIP? ION for F-,

    The Bill blog on PHAROS stunned me. I didn’t know PHAROS but it was over 400 ft tall?? How did they get up there to light the fire?? What a job.

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