0124-21 NY Times Crossword 24 Jan 21, Sunday

Constructed by: Lucy Howard & Ross Trudeau
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Sugar, Sugar

Themed answers are combinations of brands of SUGARY candy:

  • 22A Bookworms call dad? : NERDS RING POP (Nerds & Ring Pop)
  • 31A A young Justice Ginsburg chuckles? : BABY RUTH SNICKERS (Baby Ruth & Snickers)
  • 47A Do core exercises all day, every day? : CRUNCH NOW AND LATER (Crunch & Now and Later)
  • 67A Burger King bingefest? : WHOPPERS SPREE (Whoppers & Spree)
  • 84A Supernova in our galaxy? : MILKY WAY STARBURST (Milky Way & Starburst)
  • 103A When E.M.T.s bring home the bacon? : LIFESAVERS’ PAYDAY (Lifesavers & PayDay)
  • 115A Some astronomy Ph.D.s? : MARS SMARTIES (Mars & Smarties)

Bill’s time: 21m 22s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Onetime Sony rival : TOSHIBA

The Japanese company that we know today as Toshiba was formed in 1939 with the merger of Tokyo Electric and Shibaura Engineering Works. The “To-shiba” name comes from a melding of TO-kyo and SHIBA-ura.

12 Maker of the X6 and Z4 : BMW

The initialism “BMW” stands for Bayerische Motoren Werke, which translates into Bavarian Motor Works. BMW was making aircraft engines during WWI, but had to cease that activity according to the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. The company then started making motorcycles, and moved into automobile production starting in 1928. BMW moved back into aircraft engine manufacturing during the build-up of the Luftwaffe prior to WWII.

15 Doctors Without Borders, e.g.: Abbr. : ORG

Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) is an international aid organization that was founded in France in 1971. The organization is usually referred to as Doctors Without Borders here in North America, but goes by the initialism MSF in much of the world.

18 Deep secret : ARCANUM

Arcana are deep secrets or mysteries. “Arcana” is from the Latin adjective “arcanum” meaning “secret, hidden”.

19 “___ Dead?” (Mark Twain play) : IS HE

Mark Twain’s play “Is He Dead?” was written in 1898, but it wasn’t published in print until over 100 years later, in 2003. It opened on Broadway in 2007, and ran for 105 performances.

24 South Beach and Paleo, for two : FAD DIETS

The fad diet known as the South Beach Diet was developed in the mid-nineties by Dr. Arthur Agatston as the Modified Carbohydrate Diet. Agatston later named it for the South Beach neighborhood in Miami Beach, which was close to his practice. The diet really took off after Agatston published his “The South Beach Diet” book in 2003.

The paleolithic (or “paleo, caveman”) diet is a fad diet that became popular in the 2000s. The idea is to eat wild plants and animals that would have been available to humans during the Paleolithic era (roughly the Stone Age). This period precedes the introduction of agriculture and the domestication of animals. As a result, someone on the diet avoids consuming grains, legumes, dairy and processed foods. The diet consists mainly of lean meat (about 45-65% of the total calorie intake), non-starchy vegetables, fruits, berries and nuts.

26 Swiss painter Paul : KLEE

Artist Paul Klee was born in Switzerland, but studied art in Munich in Germany. We can see many of Klee’s works in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. If you get to Bern in Switzerland, even more of them can be seen at the Zentrum Paul Klee that was opened in 2005. Klee’s most celebrated work is his pointillist painting from 1932 called “Ad Parnassum”, which is owned by the Kunstmuseum, also located in Bern.

27 Company whose business is picking up? : UBER

In some locations, the transportation network company Uber offers water-taxi services under the brand name UberBOAT. Most notably available in the city of Istanbul in Turkey, the service is also offered in other locations, often during special events.

29 Big Apple media inits. : NYT

“The New York Times” (NYT) has been published since 1851, and is sometimes referred to as “the Gray Lady”. These days a viable alternative to buying the paper is to read the news online. NYTimes.com is the most popular online newspaper website in the country.

31 A young Justice Ginsburg chuckles? : BABY RUTH SNICKERS

Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (RBG) served on the US Supreme Court. Justice Ginsburg was the second woman to join the Court, and was nominated by President Bill Clinton. She was diagnosed with colon cancer in 1999 and underwent surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. During that time she did not miss one day on the bench. In 2009 Justice Ginsburg had surgery for pancreatic cancer, and was back to work 12 days later. She had left-lung lobectomy to remove cancerous nodules in 2018, which forced Justice Ginsburg to miss oral argument in January 2019, for the first time since joining the court 25 years earlier. She finally succumbed to pancreatic cancer in 2020. Much of Ginsburg’s life is recounted in the excellent 2018 movie “On the Basis of Sex”.

40 Fancy Feast alternative : WHISKAS

The brand name “Whiskas” has been used for cat food since 1988, but the product itself has been made in McLean, Virginia since 1936. Whiskas was originally sold under the name “Kal Kan”.

43 One “R” in R&R : REST

Rest and relaxation/recuperation/recreation (R&R, R‘n’R)

51 “___ Brockovich” : ERIN

Erin Brockovich is an environmental activist who is famous for the role she played in building a case against Pacific Gas & Electric for contaminating drinking water. Her story was told in a 2000 film title “Erin Brockovich” starring Julia Roberts in the title role. Brockovich herself actually appeared in the film, as she was given a cameo as a waitress in a restaurant scene.

53 Elusive legend : YETI

The yeti, also known as the abominable snowman, is a beast of legend. “Yeti” is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology, and a cryptid is a creature or plant that isn’t recognized by the scientific community, but the existence of which has been suggested.

54 Business for Sanders supporters? : KFC

“Colonel” Sanders of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) fame has been portrayed in ads on television by several celebrities. The list includes Norm Macdonald, Jim Gaffigan, George Hamilton, Billy Zane, Rob Lowe, Ray Liotta and even Reba McEntire.

57 Holiday dish served with sour cream or applesauce : LATKES

A latke is a delicious potato pancake (I’m Irish, so anything made with potato is delicious!).

60 Links grp. : USGA

The United States Golf Association (USGA) was formed in 1894. The need for a governing body for the sport became evident that year when both the Newport Country Club and the St. Andrew’s Golf Club in Yonkers, declared that the winner of a tournament at each of their courses was the “national amateur champion”. The first president of the USGA was Theodore Havemeyer, and to this day the one and only US Amateur Trophy bears his name.

The oldest type of golf course is a links course. The name “links” comes from the Old English word “hlinc” meaning “rising ground”. “Hlinc” was used to describe areas with coastal sand dunes or open parkland. As a result, we use the term “links course” to mean a golf course that is located at or on the coast, often amid sand dunes. The British Open is always played on a links course.

64 Hunky-dory : A-OK

Our term “A-OK” is supposedly an abbreviation for “A(ll systems are) OK”, and arose at NASA in the sixties during the space program.

Surprisingly (to me), the term “hunky-dory” has been around a long time, and is documented back in the mid-1800s. Nobody’s really sure of its origin, but some say it is an Anglicization of Honcho dori, that back in the day was a street of ill repute in Yokohama, Japan.

67 Burger King bingefest? : WHOPPERS SPREE

If you were in Japan at the end of 2009 and went to Burger King, you might have ordered a Windows 7 Whopper, a promotion for the Windows 7 Operating System. The sandwich was 5 inches in height, and contained seven beef patties!

71 Alma mater for Spike Lee and Donald Glover, for short : NYU

The main campus of the private New York University (NYU) is located right in Manhattan, in Washington Square in the heart of Greenwich Village. NYU has over 12,000 resident students, the largest number of residents in a private school in the whole country. NYU’s sports teams are known as the Violets, a reference to the violet and white colors that are worn in competition. Since the 1980s, the school’s mascot has been a bobcat. “Bobcat” had been the familiar name given to NYU’s Bobst Library computerized catalog.

74 ___ golf : DISC

Disc golf is also known as Frisbee golf, and sometimes even Frolf. Believe it or not, disc golf predates the introduction of the Frisbee. The first game was played at a school in Bladworth, Saskatchewan in 1926. The participating schoolkids threw tin lids into circles drawn on a course they created in the school grounds. They named the game “Tin Lid Golf”.

75 Sloped roof support : RAFTER

Rafters are the beams that slope from the ridge of a roof down to the tops of the supporting walls.

77 Govt. org. with a forerunner known as the Black Chamber : NSA

The National Security Agency (NSA) was set up in 1952 by President Truman, a replacement for the Armed Forces Security Agency that had existed in the Department of Defense since 1949. The NSA has always been clouded in secrecy and even the 1952 letter from President Truman that established the agency was kept under wraps from the public for over a generation. I really like the organization’s nickname … “No Such Agency”.

83 Hops-drying oven : OAST

An oast is a kiln used for drying hops as part of the brewing process. Such a structure might also be called an “oast house” or “hop kiln”. The term “oast” can also apply to a kiln used to dry tobacco.

84 Supernova in our galaxy? : MILKY WAY STARBURST

A nova (plural “novae”) is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

97 Symbols in Twitter handles : ATS

The “at symbol” (@) originated in the commercial word, as shorthand for “each at, per” and similar phrases. I suppose we see the symbol most commonly these days as part of email addresses.

103 When E.M.T.s bring home the bacon? : LIFESAVERS’ PAYDAY

Back in the day, a wealthy person would “bring home the bacon”, and sit around with guests “chewing the fat”.

109 A/C spec : BTU

In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured using the British Thermal Unit (BTU). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

110 Members of the crow family : JAYS

The bird known as a “jay” is sometimes called a “magpie”, although the terms are not completely interchangeable.

111 Heavier alternative to a foil : EPEE

The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

112 Guthrie who performed at Woodstock : ARLO

Singer Arlo Guthrie is known for his protest songs, just like his father Woody Guthrie. The younger Guthrie only ever had one song in the top 40: a cover version of “City of New Orleans”. He has lived for years in the town of Washington, just outside Pittsfield, Massachusetts. His 1976 song “Massachusetts” has been the official folk song of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1981.

1969’s Woodstock Music & Art Fair was held on a dairy farm located 43 miles southwest of the town of Woodstock, New York. 400,000 young people attended, and saw 32 bands and singers perform over three days.

119 Longtime Japanese P.M. who stepped down in 2020 : ABE

Shinzo Abe first became Prime Minister of Japan in 2006, at which time he was the youngest person to hold the post since WWII and was the first PM born after the war. Abe was in office for less than a year, but was voted in again in 2012. At the end of 2019, Abe became the longest-serving Prime Minister in the history of Japan. He resigned from office in 2020, citing medical issues.

120 “Runnin'” team of N.C.A.A. Division I college basketball : UTES

The Runnin’ Utes are the basketball team of the University of Utah. The team was given the nickname the Runnin’ Redskins back when Jack Gardner was the head coach from 1953 to 1971. The “Runnin’” part of the name was chosen because Gardner was famous for playing quick offenses. The “Redskins” name was later dropped in favor of the less controversial “Utes”.

122 Disciple : PROTEGE

We use the term “protégé” for someone whose career is helped along and guided by a more experienced person, a mentor. “Protégé” is French for “protected”.

125 Capital near the North Sea : OSLO

The Norwegian capital of Oslo is located at the northern end of a fjord known as Oslofjord. The fjord is home to 40 islands that lie within the city’s limits. Oslo also has 343 lakes.

Down

4 The land down under? : HADES

Hades was the god of the underworld to the ancient Greeks. Over time, Hades gave his name to the underworld itself, the place where the dead reside. The term “Hades” was also adopted into the Christian tradition, as an alternative name for hell. But, the concept of hell in Christianity is more akin to the Greek “Tartarus”, which is a dark and gloomy dungeon located in Hades, a place of suffering and torment.

6 Prickly covering of a seed : BUR

“Bur” is a variant spelling of the word “burr”. Both terms apply to a seed vessel that has hooks or prickles on the outside.

8 Beatles title woman : RIGBY

When Paul McCartney was writing “Eleanor Rigby”, he started out with the title “Daisy Hawkins”. He also had a “Father McCartney” in the lyrics, but was afraid that folks would assume that was a reference to his Dad. So, he looked through the phone book and changed McCartney to McKenzie. The name Eleanor was borrowed from actress Eleanor Bron (a fine English actress who had a role in the movie “Help!”). The name Rigby came from Rigby & Evans Ltd, Wine & Spirit Shippers. Whatever it takes, I guess!

12 “The ___ — is wider than the Sky” (start of an Emily Dickinson poem) : BRAIN

Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1800 poems in her lifetime, with less than a dozen published before she died in 1886. Emily’s younger sister discovered the enormous collection, and it was published in batches over the coming decades.

13 Bit of fill-in-the-blanks fun : MAD LIB

Mad Libs is a word game, one mostly played by children in America. The idea is that one player provides a list of words which are then inserted into blank spots in a story, usually with hilarious results (they say!).

14 Subject of intl. treaties : WMD

The first recorded use of the term “Weapon of Mass Destruction” (WMD) was in 1937. The words were used by Cosmo Gordon Lang, the Archbishop of Canterbury at the time, in reference to the bombardment of Guernica in Spain during the Spanish Civil War by the German Luftwaffe. He said, “Who can think without horror of what another widespread war would mean, waged as it would be with all the new weapons of mass destruction?”

17 Sports team V.I.P.s : GMS

General manager (GM)

20 Corporate money managers, for short : CFOS

Chief financial officer (CFO)

23 Ancient Egyptians : NUBIANS

Nubia is a region shared by Egypt and Sudan that lies along the Nile river. The name “Nubia” comes from the Nuba people who settled in the area in the 4th century.

28 Ally of the Brat Pack : SHEEDY

Ally Sheedy is best known as a member of the “Brat Pack”, so she appeared in “The Breakfast Club” and “St. Elmo’s Fire”. She was in another of my favorite films, “WarGames”. To be honest, I haven’t enjoyed the movies in which Sheedy has appeared since those early days.

The “Brat Pack” moniker is reminiscent of the Rat Pack of the fifties and sixties (Frank Sinatra & co.). To qualify as a “founding” member of the Brat Pack, the actor had to appear in either “The Breakfast Club” or “St. Elmo’s Fire”, or both. So we have Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, Rob Lowe, Andrew McCarthy, Demi Moore, Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy.

31 Common baking pear : BOSC

Bosc is a cultivar of the European pear that is grown mainly in the northwest of the United States. It is named for French horticulturist Louis Bosc. The cultivar originated in Belgium or France in the early 19th century. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck.

32 Sacred cross in ancient Egypt : ANKH

The ankh was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character for “eternal life”. The ankh wasn’t just used in inscriptions but was often fashioned into amulets and as surrounds for mirrors (perhaps symbolizing a view into another world). The ankh is also known as “the key of the Nile” and “crux ansata” (Latin for “cross with a handle”).

35 Only Stratego piece with a letter on it : SPY

The wonderful board game called Stratego derives from a traditional Chinese game called “Jungle” or “Animal Chess”. The major difference between Stratego and Jungle is that in the latter, the identity of the pieces is not hidden from one’s opponent.

37 Sardine container : TIN

Sardines are oily fish related to herrings. Sardines are also known as pilchards, although in the UK “sardine” is a noun reserved for a young pilchard. Very confusing …

45 Idaho, e.g., in dialect : TATER

Potatoes were planted in Idaho as early as 1838. Thank goodness! What we do without potatoes …?

47 Color marker : CRAYON

We use the word “crayon” for a stick of colored wax used for drawing. The term was imported in the 16th century from French, in which language it means “pencil”.

51 Gusto : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style, flair”.

“Gusto” is an Italian word meaning “taste”. We use it in English in the phrase “with gusto” meaning “with great enjoyment”.

55 One may be nominated for a Hugo Award : FANTASY SERIES

The Hugo Awards are presented annually for excellence in science fiction and fantasy writing. The awards are named for Hugo Gernsback, founder of the sci-fi magazine “Amazing Stories”.

59 “We ___ Overcome” : SHALL

The exact origins of the protest song titled “We Shall Overcome” is a little unclear. Some say that it is based on an early gospel song “I’ll Overcome Someday”, but there doesn’t seem to be much similarity between the two works beyond the titles. Early performers of the song who helped to popularize its use were Pete Seeger and Joan Baez.

65 Rocker Cobain : KURT

Kurt Cobain was famous as the lead singer of the band Nirvana. Cobain was constantly in the spotlight for the last few years of his short life. The media was fascinated with his marriage to fellow rock star Courtney Love, and continually reported on Cobain’s heroin addiction. He finally succumbed to the pressure and committed suicide by inflicting a gunshot wound to his head in 1994, at only 27 years of age.

68 Japan’s street food mecca : OSAKA

The Japanese city of Osaka used to be called Naniwa, with the name changing to Osaka sometime before 1500. “Osaka” can be translated either as “large hill” or “large slope”. Osaka is sometimes referred to as “the Chicago of Japan” as it is a major center of commerce and industry. The city has also been named the “nation’s kitchen”, and was a center for Japan’s rice trade for centuries.

69 Diarist who documented the Great Plague of London : PEPYS

Samuel Pepys was a British Member of Parliament and naval administrator, and is more famous these days for his diary than for his contribution to political history. Pepys started to keep a diary on New Year’s Day in 1660 and recorded his daily life for almost ten years. His writings include details of his personal life as well as firsthand accounts of the important events of the 1660s such as the Great Plague of 1665 and the Great Fire of London in 1666.

70 Gets lost : SCATS

Our word “scat!” means “get lost!” It comes from a 19th-century expression “quicker than s’cat”, which meant “in a great hurry”. The original phrase probably came from the words “hiss” and “cat”.

76 Eponym of the Detroit Lions field : FORD

Ford Field is the football stadium that is home to the Detroit Lions. It is an indoor stadium, and was opened for business in 2002. The naming rights were purchased at that time by the Ford Motor Company.

80 Drops an f-bomb, say : SWEARS

“F-bomb” refers to the offensive four-letter word beginning with the letter F. The term “F-bomb” was first used in print in a “Newsday” article in 1988 in a story about baseball catcher Gary Carter.

82 False fronts : FACADES

Our word “facade” has been meaning “front of a building” since the mid-17th century. We started using the term figuratively, to mean “superficial appearance”, in the mid-19th century. “Façade” is the original French word with the same meaning, from which our English term derives.

87 ___ avis : RARA

A “rara avis” is anything that is very rare. The Latin term translates as “rare bird”.

89 Dangerous move on a busy highway : UEY

Hang a “uey” or “uie”, make a u-turn, make a 180.

90 “Blueberries for ___” (kid-lit classic) : SAL

“Blueberries for Sal” is a children’s storybook by Robert McCloskey that was published in 1948. It won the Caldecott Medal in 1949, recognizing “Blueberries for Sal” as the most distinguished picture for children released in the preceding year.

91 Legendary password stealer : ALI BABA

In the folk tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, the title character is a poor woodcutter who discovers the magic phrase “Open sesame!” that opens the thieves’ den.

96 Build-your-own Tex-Mex dish : FAJITA

“Fajita” is a Tex-Mex term that refers to grilled meat served on a tortilla. The original Mexican-Spanish term “fajita” is used to describe a small strip of chicken or beef. Nowadays, fajitas are often served on a sizzling platter with the tortillas and condiments on the side.

102 Where hangers hang : CLOSET

In Old French a “clos” was an enclosure, with the diminutive form “closet” describing a small enclosure or private room. Over time this evolved into our modern usage of “closet”, describing a cabinet or cupboard.

105 They can be batted and rolled : EYES

At least as far back as the 1800s, the term “batting” was used in falconry to describe the fluttering of a hawk’s wings while on a perch or a fist, as if the bird intended to fly away. The usage of “batting” extended to the fluttering of a human’s eyelids, giving us the expressions “batting an eye” and “batting an eyelid”.

108 Volt-amperes : WATTS

The watt (W) and the volt-ampere (VA) are equivalent units of power, although not the same thing. Both are measures of electrical power but watts refer to “real power” and volt-amperes refer to “apparent power”. That’s all I know!

113 Attention hog, maybe : HAM

The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

114 Galoot : LUG

“Galoot” is an insulting term describing an awkward or boorish man, an ape. “Galoot” comes from the nautical world, where it was originally what a sailor might call a soldier or marine.

115 Portrait seen on renminbi bills : MAO

Even though we generally refer to the currency of China as the “yuan”, the yuan is actually the basic unit of the “renminbi”. This is analogous to “sterling” being the official currency of the UK, with the “pound” being the basic unit of sterling.

116 Car sticker fig. : MPG

Miles per gallon (mpg)

117 “Roses ___ red …” : ARE

As little kids we used to taunt each other with:

Roses are red
Violets are blue
God made me beautiful
What happened to you?

We weren’t very nice …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Onetime Sony rival : TOSHIBA
8 Off-color : RACY
12 Maker of the X6 and Z4 : BMW
15 Doctors Without Borders, e.g.: Abbr. : ORG
18 Deep secret : ARCANUM
19 “___ Dead?” (Mark Twain play) : IS HE
20 Quickly learn one’s lesson? : CRAM
21 Startling sound : BAM!
22 Bookworms call dad? : NERDS RING POP
24 South Beach and Paleo, for two : FAD DIETS
26 Swiss painter Paul : KLEE
27 Company whose business is picking up? : UBER
28 Seedy area? : SOIL
29 Big Apple media inits. : NYT
30 Depletes, with “up” : USES …
31 A young Justice Ginsburg chuckles? : BABY RUTH SNICKERS
36 Signature item : PEN
37 Singer Watson, a.k.a. Tones and I, with the 2019 hit “Dance Monkey” : TONI
38 Apt name for a lawyer : SUE
39 False accusation, informally : BUM RAP
40 Fancy Feast alternative : WHISKAS
43 One “R” in R&R : REST
46 Hoarse : RASPY
47 Do core exercises all day, every day? : CRUNCH NOW AND LATER
51 “___ Brockovich” : ERIN
52 Quick drive : SPIN
53 Elusive legend : YETI
54 Business for Sanders supporters? : KFC
57 Holiday dish served with sour cream or applesauce : LATKES
60 Links grp. : USGA
62 Hard to handle, in a way : EELY
64 Hunky-dory : A-OK
66 Response to an order : AYE
67 Burger King bingefest? : WHOPPERS SPREE
71 Alma mater for Spike Lee and Donald Glover, for short : NYU
72 Logical connector : NOR
73 With the greatest of ___ : EASE
74 ___ golf : DISC
75 Sloped roof support : RAFTER
77 Govt. org. with a forerunner known as the Black Chamber : NSA
79 Race units : LAPS
81 Dinner table expander : LEAF
83 Hops-drying oven : OAST
84 Supernova in our galaxy? : MILKY WAY STARBURST
90 Follower of word or potato : … SALAD
93 “Gimme ___” : A SEC
94 ___-cat : SCAREDY
95 Numerous : A LOT OF
97 Symbols in Twitter handles : ATS
99 Like ___ of sunshine : A RAY
100 Anatomical pouch : SAC
103 When E.M.T.s bring home the bacon? : LIFESAVERS’ PAYDAY
108 “I mean …” : WELL …
109 A/C spec : BTU
110 Members of the crow family : JAYS
111 Heavier alternative to a foil : EPEE
112 Guthrie who performed at Woodstock : ARLO
113 Cutting edge? : HAIRLINE
115 Some astronomy Ph.D.s? : MARS SMARTIES
119 Longtime Japanese P.M. who stepped down in 2020 : ABE
120 “Runnin'” team of N.C.A.A. Division I college basketball : UTES
121 Comparable (to) : AKIN
122 Disciple : PROTEGE
123 Tarnish : MAR
124 Really good time : GAS
125 Capital near the North Sea : OSLO
126 Prepares (for) : GETS SET

Down

1 Prepare for a road trip, perhaps : TANK UP
2 End of a threat : … OR ELSE
3 Nora Ephron and Sofia Coppola, for two : SCREENWRITERS
4 The land down under? : HADES
5 Walk-___ : INS
6 Prickly covering of a seed : BUR
7 “___ the only one?” : AM I
8 Beatles title woman : RIGBY
9 “___ your request …” : AS PER
10 Feature of a classical Greek drama : CHORUS
11 “You betcha!” : YEP!
12 “The ___ — is wider than the Sky” (start of an Emily Dickinson poem) : BRAIN
13 Bit of fill-in-the-blanks fun : MAD LIB
14 Subject of intl. treaties : WMD
15 Compliant sorts : OBEYERS
16 Squalid digs : RATTRAP
17 Sports team V.I.P.s : GMS
20 Corporate money managers, for short : CFOS
23 Ancient Egyptians : NUBIANS
25 Result of a breast pocket mishap, maybe : INK MARK
28 Ally of the Brat Pack : SHEEDY
31 Common baking pear : BOSC
32 Sacred cross in ancient Egypt : ANKH
33 Chance to go : TURN
34 Preserve, in a way : CURE
35 Only Stratego piece with a letter on it : SPY
37 Sardine container : TIN
41 Studmuffin : HUNK
42 Absorb, as sauce with bread : SOP UP
44 Give extra consideration, with “on” : SLEEP …
45 Idaho, e.g., in dialect : TATER
47 Color marker : CRAYON
48 Got hip, with “up” : WISED …
49 How a door might be slammed : ANGRILY
50 Subcontractor in a bathroom remodel : TILER
51 Gusto : ELAN
55 One may be nominated for a Hugo Award : FANTASY SERIES
56 Least forward : COYEST
58 Palindromic farm animal : EWE
59 “We ___ Overcome” : SHALL
61 Stubborn sorts : ASSES
63 It helps in passing : YEA
65 Rocker Cobain : KURT
68 Japan’s street food mecca : OSAKA
69 Diarist who documented the Great Plague of London : PEPYS
70 Gets lost : SCATS
76 Eponym of the Detroit Lions field : FORD
78 Any Olympian, once : AMATEUR
80 Drops an f-bomb, say : SWEARS
82 False fronts : FACADES
85 Promises, promises! : I DOS
86 Takes steps : ACTS
87 ___ avis : RARA
88 Coarse farm sound : BRAY
89 Dangerous move on a busy highway : UEY
90 “Blueberries for ___” (kid-lit classic) : SAL
91 Legendary password stealer : ALI BABA
92 Higher, as ambitions : LOFTIER
96 Build-your-own Tex-Mex dish : FAJITA
98 Does a dog trick : SPEAKS
101 Declare : ALLEGE
102 Where hangers hang : CLOSET
104 They go wherever the wind blows : VANES
105 They can be batted and rolled : EYES
106 When high school seniors often visit the colleges that accepted them : APRIL
107 Like binary questions : YES/NO
108 Volt-amperes : WATTS
113 Attention hog, maybe : HAM
114 Galoot : LUG
115 Portrait seen on renminbi bills : MAO
116 Car sticker fig. : MPG
117 “Roses ___ red …” : ARE
118 Nonsense : ROT

9 thoughts on “0124-21 NY Times Crossword 24 Jan 21, Sunday”

  1. 30:35, no errors. I’d only heard of about half of these candies, so I had to depend a lot on crossing entries. I guess I need to start walking down a certain aisle in the grocery store a little more often, if only as a spectator … 😜.

  2. 33:38 With a couple fat fingers. I knew about 2/3 of the candies – and I’ve rarely met a sugar I didn’t like – so I wasn’t sure that all of the theme answers were two candies. Like Nonny, I had to rely on crosses for the ones I didn’t know.

    For 8 I started with SADIE down and SEXY across and it took a bit to unscramble that since I didn’t know the RINGPOP part of 22A

  3. 32:38. I did have one error that I didn’t want to change. I had NYC instead of NYT which makes people live in RATCRAP instead of a RATTRAP. Apparently, I’m easily amused. Best candy of all in this grid is absolutely the snickers bar. Payday is a close second.

    Volt-Amperes and WATTS are the same thing if you’re talking about DC circuits. In AC circuits, it gets a little more complicated and trigonometry gets involved.

    Indeed, it is possible for a circuit to have a large voltage across it, draw substantial current, but consume no energy (dissipate zero watts) – e.g. a capacitor. The circuit will do no work and produce no heat, so it is drawing (and dissipating) zero watts. Yet it can draw substantial current, resulting in substantial VA.

    Best –

  4. 1:27:35 no errors…ditto about the candy names.
    @Jeff…you sound like an electrical engineer.
    Who ever says “tank up”?
    With 2 setters expect anything.
    Stay safe😀

  5. I did this one a bit faster than usual (44:18). I think I found it a little easier than most of the past Sunday puzzles.

    The only challenge was that I didn’t know a lot of the candies because we don’t have all the same varieties in Canada.

    Decent puzzle though.

  6. 42:11, no errors. The only candy that I was unfamiliar with was SPREE. My biggest hurdle was overcoming the initial entry BABY RUTH CHUCKLES in 31A. My memory of one of my favorite Movie Theater candies took precedent over the fact the setters used the word ‘chuckles’ in the clue.
    Completely surprised that ‘Alice’s Restaurant Massacree’ was not a Top 40 song, for Arlo Guthrie. I’m guessing that, at over 18 minutes in length, it did not meet Top 40 criteria.

  7. No errors.. never heard of SPREE candy.. also never heard of MADLIB game. .. and PEPYS diary didn’t ring a bell.

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